ShowSight April 2021

AFFENPINSCHER

Despite the many challenges imposed on our communities during the past year, the family of purebred dog breeders, handlers, judges, stewards, and superintendents has somehow managed to stay connected— if only in the digital world.

Now, thanks to the efforts of dedicated show chairs and their committees (and with favorable support from various local and state agencies) exhibitors are returning to the show ring in greater numbers with a renewed sense of hope and optimism for the sport of dogs and for the breeds we love.

We’ve always been amazed by your accomplishments in the ring, and we can’t wait to see what the coming year has in store for you. We’re so very happy to see you again!

THE PLACE FOR PUREBRED DOGS WITH PURPOSE SINCE 1992 www.showightmagazine.com

PARSON RUSSELL TERRIER

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4/12/21 11:04 AM

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/21

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 2/28/21

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SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/21

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

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Zen

© T&T PHOTOGRAPHY

GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh

Edgar Cruz Guevara *AKC STATS AS OF 2/28/2021

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MALTESE

Shining

Bright

© TAMMIE WILKERSON

#1 GRAND CHAMPION SYSTEM *

#2 BREED SYSTEM *

#4 ALL-BREED SYSTEM *

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MULTIPLE ALL BREED BEST IN SHOW&MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOWWINNING GCHS BARBERRY HILLWOOD HOT CHILD IN THE CITY

TO EVERYONE WHOHAS RECOGNIZED THE QUALITY OF THIS OUTSTANDING BICHON BITCH.

BEST IN SHOW – MR. DANA CLINE GROUP FIRST – MRS. PATRICIA TROTTER

THANK YOU JUDGES!

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BICHON FRISE

BRED &OWNED BY ELLENM. CHARLES, LISA BETTIS, PAULA &MATT ABBOTT

BRED BY PAULA HENDRICKS

HANDLED BY LISA BETTIS

ASSISTED BY NATALIE TAYLOR

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MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER 2020 WESTMINSTER BOB WINNER GCHS.MARTIN’S TIMEBOMBPUFF

OWNED BY: ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

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MALTESE

Success

IS NOT FINAL;

Failure Courage

IS NOT FATAL;

IT IS THE

TO CONTINUE THAT COUNTS.

- WINSTON CHURCHILL

I took my shots and now....

We’re ready to hit the road and take our shot in the ring!

We look forward to seeing our friends again at the shows And competing against the best our sport has to offer!

BRED, OWNED & HANDLED BY: DARYL MART IN

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CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

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S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N

GRACERIDGE COURAGE SIR LANCELOT OF CJS RANCH

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

JOHNNY

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION AND THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED

JOHNNY’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY DURING HIS CAREER. WE’D LIKE TO TAKE THIS

OPPORTUNITY AND GIVE A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR AMAZING HANDLERS WHOM ARE

OUR DEAR FRIENDS VALERIE NUNES-ATKINSON, ANTONIO VIDMAR AND DYLAN KIPP.

O W N E R : K A R E N P I P K I N • B R E E D E R S : K A R E N P I P K I N & J A N E G E N T Z E N

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*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/21

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DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

Owned by: Karen Pipkin & Charles Pipkin

Bred by: Karen Pipkin & Dr. Christina A.Wistrom Exclusively Handled by: Chris & Dylan Keith, Kataire Handling

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AIREDALE TERRIER

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*AKC stats

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

CH IRISH JAZZ MONPLEZIR Monty

THANK YOU JUDGES Mr. Larry Abbott, Mr. John Booth, Mrs. Elizabeth Muthard, Mrs. Anne Katona and Mr. Chales Olvis Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons and Theresa Tafoya Shown by Tonia Holibaugh and Theresa Tafoya

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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BIEWER TERRIER

POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

CH IRISH JAZZ MONPLEZIR

Monty NEW CHAMPION!

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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NORWICH TERRIER

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*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 12/31/20

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POODLE (MINIATURE)

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

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AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER 1.512.541.8128, AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM HANIFA ARAPOVIC CO-OWNER & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1.512.686.3466, HANIFA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM MICHAEL VERAS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER 1.512.893.6906, MICHAEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, HEAD OF DIGITAL BRANDS 1.908.288.7733, ALEX@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM DANIEL CARTIER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION CO-ORDINATOR 1.512.686.3466, DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM SAMANTHA ADKINS PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR, ADVERTISER RELATIONS 1.512.893.6908, SAMANTHA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ADVERTISING AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.541.8128 BONNIE GUGGENHEIM BONNIE@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM 512-971-3280 BILLY HUNTINGTON BHUNTINGTON@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM 352-560-1369 MIRANDA WILT MWILT@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM 737-444-7596 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS BJ ANDREWS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR ANDREA BRADFORD ARLENE CZECH KARL DONVIL CHRISTINE ERICKSON CELESTE GONZALEZ STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS WALTER SOMMERFELT LEE WHITIER SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIĆ MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA & CREATIVE CONTENT ELMA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.686.3466 INSTAGRAM | @SHOWSIGHTMAG FACEBOOK | WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SHOWSIGHT/ TWITTER | @THESHOWSIGHT GENERAL INQUIRIES: INFO@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM SUBSCRIPTIONS: SUBSCRIPTIONS@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM THE FROST TOWER 401 CONGRESS AVE SUITE 1540 AUSTIN, TX 78701 | 1.512.686.3466 WWW.SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM PROUDLY DESIGNED & PRINTED IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA USA

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NORFOLK TERRIER

CONTENTS

40

Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC

42

Lines From Linda: Frank Sabella Reflecting on 91 Fabulous Years LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

50

How Is Your Club Doing During the Age of COVID-19 WALTER SOMMERFELT Form Follows Function STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH Iva Kimmelman Breeder Interview ALLAN REZNIK ShowSight in Circulation BILLY HUNTINGTON & DEANNA KIDD ShowSight in Circulation Part 2 ANITA GAGE & ERIC GLOFKA ShowSight in Circulation Part 3 DEANNA KIDD & HELEN DUNNING ShowSight in Circulation Part 4 VICKI HAVICON

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134

Ring Ready: First-Time Breeders Can Have Fun Learning About Coat Color Genetics While Health Testing EMBARK

66

80

146

Ring Ready: BOH & OH Interview DR. TRACIE LALIBERTE & LIHI RUVIO

86

163

Working Group VARIOUS GUESTS

88

212

Bouvier Des Flandres VARIOUS GUESTS

98

217

Cairn Terrier VARIOUS GUESTS Setter VARIOUS GUESTS

102 Pretty Poison DAN SAYERS

221

118

Ring Ready: Interview with Lee Whittier, Dog Show Mentor DAN SAYERS

240 Norwegian Elkhound VARIOUS GUESTS

242 Coming Attractions

126

Ring Ready: A Personal Best DAN SAYERS

244 Index to Advertisers

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A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

A TIME FOR POSITIVITY AND OPTIMISM

“ O N C E YO U R E P L A C E N E G A T I V E T H O U G H T S W I T H P O S I T I V E O N E S ,

YO U ’ L L S T A R T H AV I N G P O S I T I V E T H O U G H T S . ”

— W I L L I E N E L S O N

I don’t know about you, but I’ve just about had it with all of the nega- tivity surrounding the COVID-19 health crisis. To those who con- tinue to share negativity online and in person, PLEASE stop now! Thankfully, the sport of dogs is gradually re-opening. More and more clubs have been able to host their specialty and all-breed shows this year. So, now we need to start thinking positively about the good things that will happen moving forward. Today, we know enough about the coronavirus to allow many dog events to come back and, judging by how things are going, we will have a majority (if not all) shows back in no time. Sure, there will still be certain health risks, but our sport has been able to function with risks before COVID-19. I, for one, will confidently adhere to the requirements for social distancing, mask wearing, and hand sani- tizing in order to minimize the coronavirus risks in the future. President Dwight D. Eisenhower once said, “Pessimism never won any battle.” And that’s what the COVID-19 health crisis is—a battle. Again, the positive news is that dog shows are slowly getting back up to full steam. The current challenge is to now get everyone vaccinated. (And as far as I’ve been hearing, a majority within our community have already been vaccinated.) Can we make a deal? Let’s agree to make the “new normal” better than any normal we’ve ever had before. I am sure that we will be able to achieve this simply because we are all good-hearted people who love purebred dogs and dog shows more than just about anything else. You can be sure that this year, the SHOWSIGHT family will only be sharing quality content that’s filled with positivity and optimism. I can’t wait to see y’all.

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

Est 1992

40 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021

D O N ’ T S T O P M E N O W

©HAN 2021

THANK YOU JUDGES MICKEY FEIGELSON & DARRYL VICE Back-to-back Best of Breed at the Poodle Club of Las Vegas Special ty

G C H C A B E R N E T ’ S M E R C U R Y R I S I N G

Bred & Owned by Mary and Scott Olund, Chris Manelopoulos and Rachel Corbin | Presented by Olivia Hodgkinson, Conor McFadden, and Ethan Coye

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 41

POODLE (STANDARD)

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR LINES FROM LINDA FRANK SABELLA REFLECTING ON 91 FABULOUS YEARS W hen I learned that our dog world had to say goodbye to another great legend, Frank Sabella, my mind raced back to a glorious Spring Cali- fornia afternoon visit with him 29 years ago. We were joined by his favorite friend and mentor, Anne Rogers Clark. Frank asked me to be a

contributing columnist for his new DOG WATCH magazine. I was honored and happily became a part of his team. For over two hours, Frank, Annie, and I shared stories and memories that I will not print, but will forever hold in my heart. “Spring is a season that elevates the ordinary to the extraordinary. We may experience perfect weather days. We may choose to walk barefoot over a carpet of soft grass. In these moments, our bodies and minds get to experience a little of the paradise we were made for,” wrote my dear friend, Michael Chalmers, in an Easter letter to me. I will always remember Frank Sabella. A big smile comes across my face as I imagine Frank and Annie dancing around with Poodles in a paradise like Michael Chalmers describes. May each of you experience the JOY that happy memories and Spring brings into our lives!

Spring is a season that elevates the ordinary to the extraordinary. We may experience perfect weather days. We may choose to walk barefoot over a carpet of soft grass. In these moments, our bodies and minds get to experience a little of the paradise we were made for.

—Michael Chalmers

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*AKC stats as of 2/28/21

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GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

THANK YOU JUDGES DR. ANNE P. GALLANT & MR. DENNIS J. GALLANT

Gold grand champion Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

Hound Show BIS & RBIS

© HAN 2020

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, MAUREEN TAUBER & DEBBIE HOLLY

BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 45

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MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

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THE MAY ISSUE

DEADLINE APRIL 27TH

FEATURING THE HERDING GROUP RETRIEVERS: CHESAPEAKE BAY,

GOLDEN, CURLY-COATED, FLAT-COATED, LABRADOR, NOVA SCOTIA DUCK TOLLING ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD

TOY FOX TERRIER CHINESE CRESTED

SHOWSIGHT | THE PLACE FOR PUREBRED DOGS WITH PURPOSE SINCE 1992

48 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021

The May Edition will be handed-out at

and at all shows nationwide May 15th through June 15th.

Girouard Brown FC.indd 2

A complimentary copy will be mailed and emailed to All AKC Judges. The Showsight Newsletter, which includes all of the May Edition's Articles & Ads, will be emailed to our 39,000+ subscribers, including all AKC Judges! In addition, your advertisement will be featured on the Showsight Facebook page. CUSTOM-BUILT ADS ONLY $475 / EACH ADDITIONAL PAGE ONLY $425 BOOK TODAY! hello@showsightmagazine.com | 512.541.8128

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 49

How Is Your Club Doing During the Age of COVID-19?

I t is hard to believe that we are late in the first quarter of the 21st century, and it’s hard to believe how the world we live in continues to change on an almost daily basis. It has now also been over a year since we all heard the term COVID-19 for the first time. Initially, I imagine that most people thought it would be a temporary setback that would be dealt with, and all would be back to “normal” by now. But as we all know, that has, unfortunately, not been the case. For those of us who are involved in the sport of purebred dogs, we have seen many instances of how COVID-19 has not only changed our ability to hold our shows and trials, but also the introduction to our events of many new protocols to be fol- lowed—to even hold events where they are possible. Since August of last year, when we saw a limited return of our events across the country, I have been able to attend events both as an exhibitor or judge at shows in Idaho, Ohio, Tennessee, Oklahoma, and Florida. At each of these shows, all of the exhibi- tors and judges wore masks and made honest attempts to follow social distancing guidelines. With the assistance and guidance of the AKC and, in some cases, local health officials, numerous clubs proved that safe shows could be successful. What I observed was that most exhibitors followed the rules and behaved profes- sionally, and most were just happy to be able to have a show. At the time of this writing, there are still numerous states and localities where putting on a show is either prohibited or post- poned because of ongoing regulations regarding social gather- ings. With the vaccines now available, only time will tell how rapidly the restrictions will be lifted or modified. Depending upon their location as well as their available facili- ties, several clubs have been able to hold shows. (As I understand, there are only about 30-35% of scheduled events being held at this time.) While several clubs are doing well and putting on very large and successful shows, many others are just struggling to hold their clubs together. Because of local restrictions, many clubs have not been able to meet in any way except through Zoom-type communications. Meeting sites for numerous clubs are not avail- able during the pandemic and, therefore, the in-person sharing of knowledge, ideas, and planning for future events is suffering. Even in those locations where events are permitted, many of the venues will not guarantee a club that the show will not be canceled even up to and including the day of the show. Therefore, many clubs continue not to take the financial risks of having their show canceled at the last minute—at a significant financial hit to the club as well as the exhibitors losing their entry fees.

BY WALTER SOMMERFELT

At the time of this writing, there are still numerous states and localities where putting on a show is either prohibited or postponed because of ongoing regulations regarding social gatherings. With the vaccines now available, only time will tell how rapidly the restrictions will be lifted or modified.

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B I S MRB I S GCHS N I KAL UK N KOBA’ S SHAL L WE DANCE ?

B R ED BY KAR L A & S T E PHEN WAL L

E XCL U S I VE LY HAND L ED BY E LV I N I ZAGU I RR E

OUR S I NCE R E AP P R EC I AT I ON AND GRAT I T UDE TO A L L J UDGE S WHO HAVE AWARDED ANNA’ S F I NE T Y P E AND QUA L I T Y.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 51

SIBERIAN HUSKY

HOW IS YOUR CLUB DOING DURING THE AGE OF COVID-19?

I have served as President for the past twelve years. One thing that I think has contributed to our stability has been that we operate as a true democ- racy. Each of our members has a voice. We do not rule only from the board. We gather information from our board, and our members make recommen- dations and make all major decisions as a club. We also make sure that our board is diversified with both conformation and performance individuals, so that all members’ interests have representation. We also try very hard to get every member involved. When we assign members to major jobs, we try to never give them more than one of those positions. We do this so that they can focus on their job and keep them from being spread too thin. We offer them guidance and support, but we try very hard not to micro-manage them. We allow them to grow and tackle the task at hand. We find it is also important that our members understand our mission and expectations. Like many clubs, we get visitors at most meetings and we always welcome them with open arms. We also encourage them to continue to attend, but we ask them “NOT TO JOIN” unless they plan to become involved on a regular and ongoing basis. We explain that all members count toward having a quorum and that we don’t need names on a roster. We need people who are committed to our mission and purpose. We also have a club that has embraced diversity. Having people involved in as many different aspects of the dog world is a great asset and fertile ground for learning and sharing with each other. Our cur- rent roster lists a total membership of 70, of which 10 are life members. Included in the remaining 60 individuals are 49 who have joined since 2009, with 13 of those joining since 2019, and we currently have 9 people going through our process to join. Unfor- tunately, we have lost 5 people to death in the past 5 years but, age-wise, our group covers a very broad base. A total of 34 members are primarily involved in conformation while 16 prefer the performance arena. We also have 14 who are equally involved in both conformation and performance, and 6 members who are just general dog lovers. Just like our country, clubs can be a melting pot of people with different ideas and skills. Allowing your members to use the unique talents and backgrounds that each one brings will help to build a strong group. One of the main things that keeps our members involved may be the fact that we have some type of program at every meeting. In my opinion, the pro- grams are an essential factor in the overall health and interest of the club. Our programs cover a wide range of canine-related topics; always given by well- respected individuals and veterinarians. We also, on occasion, try to have some type of fun, educational, dog-related game. We have played Doggy Jeopardy and Family Feud, and others games that get every- one involved. Since there are times when the best of plans fail, we will play BINGO with an assortment of doggy prizes when our planned speaker cancels at the last minute. And we do periodic surveys with

Clubs are having to adjust to the new rules and regulations within their communities. These adjustments are coming in the change of venues, limits on the number of entries and, in many cases, the postponement of all events until some version of normalcy returns.

Since the start of cancellations in March of 2020, I have no idea as to the total number of events that have been canceled across our country and throughout the world. As mentioned, the loss of venues, meeting places, and training facili- ties are hurting many of our local clubs. Clubs are having to adjust to the new rules and regulations within their communities. These adjustments are coming in the change of venues, limits on the number of entries and, in many cases, the postponement of all events until some version of normalcy returns. Also, as we have seen, those clubs that have found a way to host a show must adapt to local rules, find judges willing to travel and judge, and obtain stewards and volunteers to work the show. This pandemic has created additional burdens to deal with for show chairs, club members, superintendents, and many others. Most clubs are run by a limited number of members and volunteers who work and plan all year for their events. These are unpaid individuals who themselves may be dealing with the loss of jobs or lowered income due to the pandemic. In some cases, these individuals are having a difficult time caring for their basic needs, so it is understandable that the club, the shows, and the like are no longer a large part of their life, and some will, unfortunately, leave the club and the sport—and may never be involved again. These people are the collateral damage to the suffering within our clubs and our sport. Likewise, as we have seen, many club members as well as judges are senior citizens and individuals who may have underlying health conditions. Many of these people will not be taking the risk of exposure that attending shows and meetings provides. With all that has gone on during the past year, I was in a discussion with a member from another kennel club who was sharing how difficult it was to hold together their already struggling club. During our conversation, I shared with him that although it has been difficult for our club, The Tennessee Val- ley Kennel Club, we are not only holding together—we are still experiencing some growth. Of course, the reply was, “What do you feel the reason is for your continuity?” Knowing that there are many highly successful clubs throughout the coun- try, each has developed its formula for growth and continuity. It is safe to say that not all clubs have the same mission or operate in the same manner. With this in mind, I thought I would take this opportunity to share some of the things that have helped my club, the TVKC, continue to have some success.

52 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021

Presented by Joanne Thibault

T AYL O R AM GCHS / CAN GCH

SEABURY’S MADE TO MEASURE, AOM BRED AND OWNED BY ROSLYN ESKIND, SEABURY (REG’D) PWDS CH Keevabay’s Fifty Shades x GCHB Seabury’s Sophie Tucker, AOM

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 53

PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

LEONBERGER BREED 2019 * one Number LEONBERGER ALL BREED 2020 ** one Number

*AKC breed stats 2019 **AKC all breed stats 2020

54 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021

LEONBERGER

GROUP WINNER | MULTIPLE GROUP PLACEMENTS BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER

BISS GCHG BLUDRIFT’S ESCAPADES WITH ETHAN CGC

Ethan HANDLED BY CHELSAY PAUL GRUB OWNED BY MARY MONAHAN & LUANNE MOEDE BRED BY LUANNE MOEDE

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 55

HOW IS YOUR CLUB DOING DURING THE AGE OF COVID-19?

If your club is struggling, maybe you need to open yourselves up to new ideas and newmembers. There will always be turnover and disagreements, but a good attitude and the desire to work together to accomplish goals will bring great results.

kindergarten several times a year. Our classes are enthusiastically taught by Jan Flaherty, our current Vice President. Jan’s class has been instrumental in our growth, and she has helped so many new- comers find success in the ring. We also have an arrangement with a local training facility that provides agility and obedience training for our members at a reduced rate. As mentioned earlier, we try to get everyone involved and we encourage people to take on new tasks. This has served us very well. Our Agility trials, Obedience, Rally, and Fast Cats are all led by relatively newer members who have risen to the task with the encouragement and support of the membership. In 2014, we had a new couple come into our club. The couple was very new to the sport and extremely enthusiastic and yearning for knowledge. Both of these individuals, along with their high school-aged daughter at the time, jumped right in. With the men- toring of members, the daughter enjoyed a successful run in Junior Handling and the entire family has completed numerous titles in conformation and obedience on their dogs. More importantly, the couple became very involved and now serve on our board, and the wife took over our website and has made it a fantastic resource for not only members, but also interested guests. As a club, being a part of our community is also important. We sponsor a student annually with a substantial scholarship at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. We have supported numerous other charities such as the local Chil- dren’s hospital, Take the Lead, AKC Canine Health Foundatin, and many others. A few years ago, before our local cluster broke up, we were able to do several things to raise funds for charitable causes. But only being able to have a two-show weekend has hurt those efforts. As President of the TVKC, I am extremely proud of the spirit, cooperation, and level of enthusiasm that the members of our club share. I know from others how difficult it can be to have a happy and cohesive group of people working together. In closing, what I hope you take away from this article is that success—even during a pandemic—is possible. If your club is struggling, maybe you need to open yourselves up to new ideas and new members. There will always be turnover and disagreements, but a good attitude and the desire to work together to accomplish goals will bring great results. Just because someone is new or has a different perspective does not mean that they can’t contribute to the success of your club. These are tough times, and we need to be tough enough to accept change and make it work moving forward. I don’t know about you, but I sure am looking forward to get- ting our shows and events back on, and we need your clubs to make it happen. If you have any questions regarding our club and how we do things, feel free to contact me at loracvizsl@aol.com .

our membership to see what they like and dislike about the club. Programs, and the fact that we include everyone, are always high on the list. I would say, on average, we have an attendance rate of 20-35 individuals at all meetings and, since 2009, we have always had a quorum. The TVKC covers a vast area of East Tennessee. As you can imagine, geographically, it is challenging for some of our members to attend every meeting. For several years there would be votes try- ing to move the meeting locations East or West, depending upon those attending that meeting. Several years ago, we put an end to that by offering the membership a choice of Eastside or Westside of town or an alternative of a split arrangement. The members voted for the split, so now we meet six months out of the year on each end of the city. The sites are about 20 miles apart, with the fall and winter months held at the local emergency clinic on the Westside, and the Spring and Summer months held on the Eastside of town at the University of Tennessee. The split arrangement works well and it helps members on each end of town attend more meetings than in the past. As with most clubs, the pandemic caused both of our meeting sites to be unavailable. Even though we lost our meeting sites, we have only missed two meetings. We moved the meetings to mem- bers’ backyards and practiced social distancing and, when the win- ter months came, we were offered a place at a local training facility that, although not heated, has allowed us to meet and still practice social distancing very well. Like many clubs, we like to recognize the accomplishments of our members and their dogs. Each year we award members who have completed an AKC title on their dogs; a plaque recognizing the achievement with the dogs’ name and title. We do this at our annual awards picnic where we have also added the tradition of our annual Lottery Fun Match. We ask each member to bring one dog each (it doesn’t matter if it is a show dog or not, just one that they own) and we assign each an armband number and put all the numbers in a hat. We draw two numbers, and those two dogs start the competition with the judge for the initial class coming from someone who did not enter a dog. At the end of the class, the win- ner goes on to the next round and the loser is eliminated. However, the person who was just eliminated serves as the judge for the next two dogs competing. This goes on for as many rounds as it takes until one dog stands alone as Best in Match. It has always been a lot of fun, and many members remark that they could not believe how hard it was to choose between the two dogs—and the two people they knew! Training classes are also a big part of many clubs, and ours is no exception. We offer ongoing weekly conformation classes (currently on hold because of the pandemic) as well as puppy

56 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021

OWNER HANDLER CHRIS LEITKOWSKI BREEDER SUSAN A. THOMAS ZEB B I S S M B I S O H G C H S C H CAMELOT ’ S ZEBULON HERNE CD BN SH CGC TK I SD NRD VX

WEIMARANER CLUB OF AMERICA WINTER SPECIALTY BEST IN AMERICA’S # 1 SPORTING DOG NOHS 2020 * *AKC NOHS STATS 2020 TOP 10 2020 ALL SYSTEMS ** **AKC STATS 2020 SPECIALTY SHOW THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED ZEB’S BREED TYPE & MOVEMENT

© JORDON ISOM PHOTOGRAPHY

© JEANIE TROYAN McADAMS

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 57

WEIMARANER

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

TAKING A DETOUR FOR PRESERVATION BREEDERS

I am taking a bit of a detour from my usual comments on structure and move- ment. I have been pondering the advent of the use of “preservation breeder,” which has caused this new angle in my column. If a Pembroke Welsh Corgi looks more like a Cardigan, does it matter how well the dog moves? Breed character is of primary importance in any breed. If, when looking at a dog of a spe- cific breed, another breed immediately comes to mind, that dog lacks breed charac- ter. Therefore, if at first glance a dog looks as it should in make and shape, only then should one look to see if it also moves as the breed is expected to move. Movement is an integral part of type, but “make and shape” come first. Now, on to the detour. Are there any dumb questions? That depends. If someone asks a question because they don’t know the answer (especially those new to the fancy and trying to learn about their chosen breed), I don’t think so. How else are you going to learn if you are unsure about something? Are there any dumb answers ? Absolutely yes! We all know those certain individuals who have the answer for any question, whether the answer is truly a fact or is just pulled from their fanciful imaginations. The best way to learn is to ask someone whom you think has the knowledge to answer. Sounds easy, but as we warn the wonderful people who purchase our puppies, social media and the Internet are NOT the best places to find information, as you have no idea if the person answering has been in the breed for 50 years or are on their very first dog. We encourage them to contact us, their puppy’s breeders, and promise to serve as 24/7/365 free tech service for the life of the puppy. What is the most important question to ask? Think back to when you were a child or as a parent. What was the question your children asked the most? That’s easy for all of us, as the answer is, “Why? Why, Why, WHY?” What is so impor- tant, for those of us who breed and show our dogs, about asking this question? I have heard so often the statement that because most of our breeds no longer have to perform the task(s) for which they were developed, why is it so important that they can do so? Herding dogs rarely herd, Terriers rarely go-to-ground in pursuit of game, Sporting dogs and Hounds rarely hunt, and Working dogs rarely work. About the only group of dogs that still routinely perform the task for which they were developed are those found in the Toy Group. I have consistently said over the years that we who proclaim to be “show breeders” must know the whys and where- fores of the essential breed characteristics that make each of our breeds unique.

“THE BEST WAY TO LEARN IS TO ASK SOMEONE WHOM YOU THINK HAS THE KNOWLEDGE TO ANSWER.”

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G C H W I N W E I M B R E I C A H A R L I N E P U R P L E R A I N

L E T YO U R

D R E A M S

B E YO U R

W I N G S

#3 AKC ALL BREED (FEB) *AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/21 *

THANK YOU • MS BRIT JUNG • SAN ANTONIO KC • MRS DEBORAH VERDON • BRAZOS VALLEY KENNEL CLUB • FOR THE BREED WINS

PRESENTED BY: SUSAN LINE

OWNERS: SUSAN LINE & TJ PALMER

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 59

WEIMARANER

B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N H O O R AY H E N RY V. TA N I K A Z A R I

# 3

Bree d & All Bree d

*

T E A M H E N RY

Presented by Ernesto Lara AKC Registered, PHA

Bred by Mieke Cooijmans

Owned by Judith Epperson & Bradley Phifer

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AFFENPINSCHER

E R N E STO &

H E N RY

R B I S | M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N S

*AKC Breed & All Breed Stats as of 2/28/21

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 61

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

If we are going to take on the mantle of being a “preservation breeder,” then we must know our responsibilities concerning the preservation of our breed. This brings us back to breed type. We must know the “whys” of how our breed is put together the way it is. If you are not sure of the essential physical characteristics that make up your breed, you may find some hints in the first paragraphs of your breed’s AKC standard under the heading of General Description. Here is an example: “Low-set, strong, sturdily built and active, giving an impression of substance and stamina in a small space. Should not be so low and heavy-boned as to appear coarse or overdone, nor so light-boned as to appear racy. Outlook bold, but kindly. Expression intelligent and interested. Never shy nor vicious. Correct type, including general balance and outline, attractiveness of headpiece, intelligent outlook and correct temperament is of primary importance. Movement is especially important, particularly as viewed from the side. A dog with a smooth and free gait has to be reasonably sound and must be highly regarded. A minor fault must never take precedence over the above desired qualities.” If you know the writer, you probably know that the quote above is from the Pembroke Welsh Corgi standard. Compare the above to the Cardigan Welsh Corgi standard’s introduction: “Low set with moderately heavy bone and deep chest. Overall silhouette long in proportion to height, culminating in a low tail set and fox-like brush. General Impression – A handsome, powerful, small dog, capable of both speed and endurance, intelligent, sturdily built but not coarse.” If you know the writer, you probably know that the quotes above describe the two Corgis. If you guessed this while reading the first description, you knew immediately the second was the Cardigan when you read the three words in the second paragraph, “ low set tail.” If you paid attention, you should also realize that the Cardi- gan has heavier bone and a bit deeper chest than the Pembroke. You will discover several more differences in the breeds if you delve more deeply into each standard. Each of the differences would most definitely be breed characteristics, vital to delineate the dif- ferences between the breeds! What about this one: “General Appearance: A compact, closely knit dog of medium size, a leggy dog having the appearance, as well as the agility, of a great ground coverer. Strong, vigorous, energetic and quick of movement. Ruggedness, without clumsiness, is a characteristic of the breed. He can be tailless or has a tail docked to approximately four inches. Size, Pro- portion, Substance: Height – 17½ to 20½ inches, measured from the ground to the highest point of the shoulders. Any __________ measuring under 17½ inches or over 20½ inches shall be disqualified from dog show competition. Weight – Should weigh between 30 and 40 pounds. Proportion – So leggy is he that his height at the shoulders is the same as the length of his body. Body Length – Approximately the same as the height when measured at the shoulders. Body length is

Figure 1. Bas-Relief on Ancient Greek Funerary

In her article titled, “Where Did the First Dogs Come From?” Cornell University researcher Laura Shannon states, “The vast majority of breeds of dog are less than 200 years old and come from Europe. But these purebred dogs or even mixes of these breed dogs are in the minority of the dogs on the planet. Most dogs are free-ranging village dogs, which live around and among people but aren’t necessarily what you’d think of as pets.” We also know that some breeds are ancient. Some of the oldest known depictions of greyhound-like dogs were found in Turkey on temple drawings from 6,000 BC and in Iran on a 4,000 BC funerary vase. Some breeds are quite young, such as the Boykin Spaniel, which was first developed in Spartanburg, South Carolina, around 1905-1910. The Boykin Spaniel Society was founded in 1977 and began main- taining a studbook in 1979. They were recognized as a breed by the AKC in 2009. Knowing these facts, we know that purebred dog breeders are a tiny part of “where dogs come from.” I am very pleased with the increasing usage of the term “pres- ervation breeder,” which I first heard many years ago in discussion with Douglas Johnson of Clussexx fame. We need to use it when we refer to ourselves as breeders—and we should use it often! We are preservation breeders, as we are trying our very best to preserve our breeds for future generations to know and love as we do. If we do not preserve the vital characteristics that make each breed unique, we would eventually wind up with one basic type: the village dog described above. A few years ago, I could not help but notice as we drove through various villages in China’s countryside that the dogs wandering the streets from village to village all looked the same! A dog of spitz type, moderate in size, with moderate bone, prick ears, pointed muzzle, high set tail (either curled or held over the back), and square or slightly off-square in proportion. They were everywhere, from Beijing to Nanning, a distance of approximately 1,500 miles! Would one common dog be enough; one basic breed to suit all situations and human needs and personalities? What a dull world that would be. Most of us breed dogs simply because we love them. We become enamored of and establish a relationship with one breed (or several breeds) and decide to breed them, thus becoming a caretaker of that breed(s). Some breeds are quite rare, and some are as common as the copper penny. But what, exactly, is a preservation breeder? From the Livestock Conservancy ( livestockconservancy.org ) they speak of “heritage” breeding, and it is explained as “…trying to produce (livestock) animals that are the animals that you find on your great-grandparents’ farms.” We are taking that heritage and trying to preserve it for the future, placing more emphasis on the future with an eye to our chosen breed’s past and origins. Our breeds are a living link to history, but must be molded to fit into today’s society.

left: Figure 2. Boykin Spaniel; right: Figure 3. Chinese Village Dog

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G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N Freestyl ing to b i g wins ! ! !

L E GACY ' S F R E E S T Y L E M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G

T HANK YOU TO DR . V I C K I S ANDAGE , DVM AND T HE MANY J UDGE S WHO R EWA RDED H I M I N GROU P S T H I S Y E A R .

#3 A L L - B R E E D *

*AKC ALL-BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/21

Breeder/Owner: Suzanne T. Ritter 572 W County Rd. Sugarloaf, PA 18249 Expertly Presented by: Rachel Kulp

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 63

MINIATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

left: Figure 4. Pembroke Welsh Corgi; right: Figure 5. Cardigan Welsh Corgi

measured from the point of the forechest to the rear of the rump. A long body should be heavily penalized. Substance – Not too light in bone, yet never heavy-boned and cumbersome.” This describes a square dog of medium size, which is so impor- tant a breed characteristic that a dog outside of the correct param- eters in height is to be disqualified. He has no tail, or it is docked short (up to 4”). The term “leggy” implies that a short-legged dog is anathema in the breed, hence another valued breed character- istic. The use of the word “never” in the last sentence also speaks to a breed characteristic in an animal of moderate bone; rather be light than heavy. This breed must be quick and agile and cover a great amount of ground with each step, therefore well-angled at both ends. Anyone who has ever seen a Brittany hunt would know all of this to be true! Here is one more breed description: “General Appearance: A medium size ___________ giving the appearance of elegance and fitness, denoting great speed, power and balance without coarseness. A true sporting __________ that covers a maximum of distance with a minimum of lost motion. Should convey an impression of beautifully balanced muscular power and strength, combined with great elegance and grace of outline. Symme- try of outline, muscular development and powerful gait are the main considerations; the dog being built for speed and work, all forms of exaggeration should be avoided. Size, Proportion, Substance: Ideal height for dogs, 19 to 22 inches; for bitches, 18 to 21 inches, measured at the highest point of the withers. More than one-half inch above or below the stated limits will disqualify. Length from forechest to buttocks equal to or slightly greater than height at the withers. Moderate bone throughout.” There are many hints as to the identity of this breed. A dog of moderate height, this breed also has a disqualification for height outside of the stated limits. Moderate bone and a dog bred for speed and work, this description also uses “muscular power and

strength” as well as “great elegance and grace of outline. Symmetry of outline, muscular development and powerful gait are the main consid- erations.” This should definitely lead you to Whippet. I often offer on social media to answer any questions a person new to my breed may have. Someone sent me a personal message asking why the shape of the foot mattered in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. My first thought was, “What a silly question.” I quickly realized that it was not only not silly, it was quite a good question. This was my answer: “The shape of a dog’s foot depends on the work the dog was bred to do and the terrain over which the dog had to work. There are three basic types of foot—cat, hare, and oval (there are other foot shapes, usually for a specific purpose; like the large, flat “snowshoe” foot of the Tibetan Terrier). The cat foot is round and compact with well arched, closely-held toes, with the two center toes being only slightly longer than those on the outside. It is similar to the paw of a cat. (Examples of a cat foot: Doberman Pinscher, Australian Cattle Dog.) It is for dogs that need the endurance to work long hours and distances over hard or varied surfaces. It leaves a round paw print on the ground. A hare foot is one in which the two center toes are longer than the two outer toes, with less arching than you would see on a cat foot, making it look longer overall. It resembles the foot of a hare (rabbit paws) and is mostly seen on dogs that need speed and agility. The oval foot falls between the hare and cat foot for a dog that needs bursts of speed and agility for quick changes in direction, and [one that] works long hours as well as traversing over all sorts of terrain for long distances—which is why a Pembroke Welsh Corgi has an oval foot, an essential breed characteristic. (By comparison, a Car- digan has a larger, rounded foot.)” If you have someone asking you a question and are unsure of the answer, please don’t hesitate to tell them you aren’t certain, but you will try to find the answer or tell them where you think they may find it. Don’t just blow them off, as I almost did. Remember when you started in the wonderful world of showing and breeding dogs and how hard it was to find the answers to your questions? For me, it was nearly impossible, as there was no Internet on which to ask a question and there were very few books available on the sub- ject either. Had I not found wonderful mentors in Pat Parsons and Scootie Sherlock (Caralon) and Dr. Chuck Kruger (Schaferhaus), it would have been challenging for me to continue blindly along the way, and I may well have given up so many years ago. Be willing to pass on what you have learned to others. It is all about the preserva- tion of the breed or breeds you love! If anyone has a question or comments, or to inquire about a seminar, contact me at jimanie@welshcorgi.com Remember, there are no dumb questions!

left: Figure 6. Brittany; right: Figure 7. Whippet

64 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G & P L A C I N G

GCHS CH OVERO SUMMER LOVE

CH DELL-ROSS BRYNLEA BLACK HOLE BLUES X CH OVERO PINKALICIOUS AX OAJ

OWNED BY JENNIFER PORTER DELMER CO-OWNED & BRED BY JAIME BRAGG EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

Ruby

THANK YOU JUDGES

GREATER KERRVILLE KC 3/11 - BREED - MRS. ANNE KATONA 3/12 - BREED - DR. GARY L. SPARSCHU GROUP 4 - MS. ELIZABETH MUTHARD

BRAZOS VALLEY KC 3/29 - BREED - MR. JOHN F. BOOTH GROUP 4 - MR. KENNETH A. BUXTON 3/21 - BREED - MR. LARRY C. ABBOTT GROUP 4 - MS. LINDA CLARK

Type & Movement

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, APRIL 2021 | 65

PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

Iva Kimmelman judging in Sweden

IVA KIMMELMAN Merci Isle Whippets BREEDER INTERVIEW BY ALLAN REZNIK

Where did you grow up? I grew up in Seattle, Washington. Do you come from a doggy family? If not, how did the interest in breeding and show- ing purebred dogs begin? I don’t come from a purebred fancier family per se, but we always had dogs as companions, many of which were purebreds. I used to bring home strays, too. (There were no leash laws in those days.) Some- times, they belonged to someone else, but being dogs, they probably thought I might be a lot of fun. In 1964, I got a job after school for $1.25 per hour at a kennel in Kenmore, Washington, called Blue Moon. The owner raised Beagles and Bedlingtons, and was developing a breed of fancy cat called Shaded Silver Shorthairs, by breeding Siamese to Persians. Her name was Gay Valentine. She became famous in the cat community. She set the bug in my ear about the joy and rewards of breeding. It was during my care of the cats and that breeding program, and caring for her dogs, that I realized I wanted to create dogs. I got to help with whelpings and, sadly, cleanup after terrible fights between those Bedlingtons. She was the one who taught me to groom dogs, which is something I did for 35 years. I had no idea which breed that would be, but I had seen a photo on the cover of Life magazine of a Whippet. Little did I know that image was in a file in my brain. I was still in high school in 1966 when I went to work at a very fancy kennel that specialized in German Shepherds, many from Germany, called Royal Acres in Woodinville, Washington. It was a very fancy place with lots of land, all fenced with three luxury homes and my house, which was also quite nice. The finest facilities, and the people who ran it took immaculate care of the dogs that were all owned by a very wealthy woman named Bertine Piggott of Piggott Aviation in Seattle. It was

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 2/28/21

BIEWER TERRIER

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