Top Notch Toys - June 2021

GCH CAMPARIS COASTWIND

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Zen GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen

#1 GRAND CHAMPION SYSTEM *

#2 BREED SYSTEM *

#5 ALL-BREED SYSTEM *

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh

Edgar Cruz Guevara *AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/2021

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©HAN ‘21

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

Donny

#1 BIEWER TERRIER *

RUS. CH, AKC GCHB IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA

First Grand Champion and Grand Champion Bronze in Biewer Terriers! 2020 Best of Miscellaneous AKC Royal Canin US Championship 2017 Best in Show Specialty designated AKC FSS BTCA Specialty Multiple AKC FSS Best in Shows Westminster Invitee in Top 5

Highest Biewer Terrier breed winning record in AKC FSS and AKC Biewer Terriers to date

Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons, Noble Inglett, Theresa Tafoya and Daniel Yona Handled expertly for Westminster by Tonia Holibaugh

#1 ALL BREED BIEWER TERRIER *

Win

RUS. CH, AKC CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS, CM4

First Biewer Terrier to win a Toy Group and have multiple Group wins! 2019 Best of Miscellaneous AKC Royal Canin US Championship Multiple AKC FSS Best in Shows Westminster Invitee in Top 5 Bred by Olga Ptichenko Owned by Michele Lyons, Cindi Iken, Daniel Yona, Noble Inglett, and Theresa Tafoya Handled expertly for Westminster by Edgar Cruz Guevara

Monty

CHAMPION IRISH JAZZ MONPLEZIR

Up and coming superstar! New Champion making his debut at Westminster with his owner Theresa! Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons and Theresa Tafoya Handled expertly for Westminster by his co-owner Theresa Tafoya

*AKC stats as of 4/30/21

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

Triple Crown’s Three Boys are Going to Westminster!

Monty Win Donny

CHAMPION IRISH JAZZ MONPLEZIR

CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS

GCHB IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA

Handled by Theresa Tafoya

Handled by Edgar Cruz Guevara

Handled by Tonia Holibaugh

SPONSORED FOR WESTMINSTER BY THE HONORABLE KYLE GIEM

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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After laying low during the pandemic THIS TERRIFIC TEAM IS OFF TO A DYNAMITE START!

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER 2020 WESTMINSTER BOB WINNER MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER

WATCH FOR HIMWITH DARYL IN THE TOY GROUP

THANK YOU JUDGES FOR A GREAT START TO 2021!

Owned by ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

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OUR FIRSTWEEKENDS OUT IN 2021!

FLASH! TIMEBOMBWINS ANOTHER ALL-BREED BEST IN SHOWAND BACK-TO-BACK GROUP ONES! JANESVILLE-BELOIT KC

GROUP SECOND - DR. ADAM KING GROUP SECOND - LORAINE BOUTWELL GROUP SECOND - JANIE BOUSEK GROUP THIRD - MR. ROBERT HUTTON GROUP THIRD - MR. EUGENE BLAKE

Bred, Owned and Handled by DARYL MARTIN

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

18

32

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1-908-288-7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR/EDITOR

20

54

18 Toy Talk 20 Toy Box

52

An Affenpinscher in Your Home? Get Ready! Linda Pollack

Bonnie Guggenheim

Scott Toney & Nancy Williams 54

The Affenpinscher Barry Leece

BONNIE GUGGENHEIM Advertising Director/Editor bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512-971-3280 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1-512-686-3466

26 Contracts for Show Prospect Puppies Lisa M. Curry, Esq.

56 58 60 62

The History of the Maltese Denise Hunter & Tammy Simon

32 The Second Time Around Pat Bullard 36 The Coming of Busby Kate Gilpin 40 Back to Basics...It’s Time Jacqueline L. Stacy 45 Acceptable Colors of the Affenpinscher Cameron Riegel

Topknot History Daryl Martin

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

Handling the Italian Greyhound William H. Monohon

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

The Basics of Judging the Italian Greyhound Lilian S. Barber

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GCHP Dartan Diamonds are Forever at Viva

Tiffany

Back-to-Back BISS Hudson Valley Chihuahua Club Back-to-Back Toy Specialty BOV Thank you to All the Judges Wins from Veterans Class BR E D BY DAR TAN CH I HUAHUA OWN E D & E XC L U S I V E LY HAND L E D BY C E C I L I A BO Z Z O T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 11

CAMPARIS COASTWIND G R A N D C H A M P I O N

GROUP WINNING MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING JUST STARTING SPECIALS CAREER WITH LIMITED SHOWING

THANK YOU TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HONORED INDY WITH THESE FANTASTIC WINS

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ON THE COVER...

HANDLER: DARON NEWCOMB OWNERS: DIANA SUMMERS & MARY KEELING BREEDERS: MARCUS & BEATE ACKERMAN

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B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N

REH-PINS I AMCHARMED FOR CHERISTAR

B E S T O F B R E E D 2 0 2 1 M P C A R E G I O N A L S P E C I A LT Y J U D G E P A M D E H E T R E B R E E D * O H M I N I AT U R E P I N S C H E R * #3 #1 B R E E D E R / OW N E R / H A N D L E R C H E R I E M C D A N I E L

* A KC S TAT S A S O F 4 / 3 0 / 2 1

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B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N H O O R AY H E N RY V. TA N I K A Z A R I

# 3

Bree d & All Bree d

*

T E A M H E N RY

Presented by Ernesto Lara AKC Registered, PHA

Bred by Mieke Cooijmans

Owned by Judith Epperson & Bradley Phifer

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E R N E STO &

H E N RY

R B I S | M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N S

*AKC breed & all breed stats as of 4/30/21

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Looking Back, but LOVING 2021! TOY TALK ETCETERA by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor

Y our first show dog was probably not one you would show today, but you learned from that experience with excitement, frustration, sometimes anger, and on occasion, the big thrill of victory. Was that first win one of the most exciting things that ever happened to you? A professional handler might have made that first successful win for you as you watched from ringside or sat at home by the phone waiting for results; waiting by your home phone, long before cell phones and the Internet for many dog show people, exhibitors, and advertisers—even judges! After a couple years of winning came the desire to breed your, hopefully, new champion and the search was on to locate the perfect choice for breeding. Maybe you had a mentor who helped you make good decisions, but by now you were hooked on our wonderful sport. While cleaning out excess papers, I could not help but start leafing through old issues of Top Notch Toys . After all, this magazine has been in print for 34 years; ever since Joe McGinnis and Duane Doll saw the need for a way to promote

the time and where many exhibitors and judges learned the finer points of not only the breed, but also helping you be up for the challenge; off to an AKC show with excitement and a burning desire to be successful. Where did you win your first points and under whom? I’d love to know! Many of you advertised for the first time in TNT with those never-to- be-forgotten first Owner-Handled wins. Many Profession- al Handlers in the making came from that early success. Those of you who are still around have progressed from breeding and exhibiting to judging; first Specialties and then acquiring Groups, starting with Group 5 and then on to greater success as a multiple Group judge. Ah, those memories along the way, as well as the tears, but look at all of us who are still doing what we know best; we always find something exciting about it. This saying hangs in my office along with framed copies of of many front and back covers of TNT and a few of my old champions and my personal ads: “Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but the moments that take our breath away.” I know you have had lots of them! Those of you who have fabulous memories, write your sto- ries and email them to me. Remember, inquiring minds want to know what is going on in your dog show world. Watch for new and important Toy dogs in TNT —and how about being one of them? Have a winning, safe, and won- derful summer after the Year of the Pandemic.Warmwish- es for continued success. Bonnie bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512.971.3280

the Pekingese and the Toy dogs they always loved, bred, and handled! It was hard to put TNT down once I’d started down memory lane. Most of us started with a house pet we loved and, for some reason, became interested in dog shows and showing dogs—and the rest is history. Do you remember the reason? At the time, I never thought it was dog show history in themaking, but you believed you could breed and show your own dogs. Wow, what a feeling that was! So, off to confor- mation classes and pup- py matches, which were plentiful at

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M U LT I O H G R O U P W I N N I N G • M U LT I G R O U P P L AC I N G • O H B I S GCHS TYAVA’ S SUGARFOOTS STRIKE FORCE

Number 1 OHS YORKSHIRE TERRIER * *AKC NOHS stats as of 5/8/21

THANK YOU TO JUDGE TIMOTHY CATTERSON FOR BOBOH AND JUDGE NICHOLAS DEBEDOUT, BOGOTA, COLUMBIA FOR THIS AWESOME GROUP 2 WIN AND NICE COMPLIMENTS.

BREEDER: AVA TYREE, TYAVA’S YORKIES

OWNER/HANDLER: VICKI EDWARDS, SUGARFOOT YORKIES

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog. 20 • T op N otch T oys , J une 2021

DEBARAH BILLINGS BREEDER OWNER HANDLER WWW.WINDSONGBIEWERS.COM

AKC BREEDER OF MERIT

LUKE EHRICHT &

#1 Bitch in Breed * *AKC breed stats as of 4/30/21

© HAN ‘21

GCH CH WINDSONG’S SOMETHIN’ TO TALK ABOUT

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THANK YOU JUDGE THOMAS DANIELS AND JUDGE LAUREN PAYNE FOR OUR SPECIALTY WINS. THANK YOU JUDGE GARY STILES FOR OUR BREED WIN AND BEST IN SHOW.

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CH IDOL ICON WEISSE ORCHIDEE

“WHO’S YOUR Superman”

OWNED BY BIEWER VON FRITZ

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CONTRACTS FOR SHOW PROSPECT PUPPIES

by Lisa M. Curry, Esq.

T he sale of a showprospect puppy is amatter of contract, even if never put in writing. An oral (unwritten) agree- ment, to exchange something of value for money or for something else of value, is still a contract. A show prospect contract can be complex and, therefore, difficult to prepare. A breeder is trying to predict (and en- sure) that the pup will succeed in the show ring in 6, 12 or 18 months, and then succeed in breeding; this is never a sure thing, particularly when the puppy is going to a new home and virtually all aspects of the dog’s life are out of the breeder’s hands. Even with the best puppy, there is a risk that the buyer will not achieve the dog’s potential—out of ignorance, neglect, or just through poor decisions. Many factors must be considered, and optimally, addressed in the contract. Since a breeder’s career depends on the success of what they breed, you’d think that they would try to maximize the chances of each show prospect succeeding, including spell- ing out what the Breeder and Buyer will need to do, tomake that happen—andwhat the parties will do if something goes wrong. Too many times deals are struck for show potential puppies, without a full disclosure of the expectations of each party, of what could go wrong, and of what the parties will do about it, if it does. Contracts that lack specificity of important terms, con- tracts that aren’t in writing, and those made without ad- equate forethought about what can and probably will hap- pen, are all inherently problematic. Consider this example: • Seller says to Buyer of a lovely young pup, “It’s yours for $2,000, and if it turns out nice, you can show and breed it.” Buyer says, “Great,” pays the money, takes the puppy home. Was that a contract? Yes, although a rather poorly formed one—for several reasons: • First, it was not in writing. Down the road, these parties have no way to prove what the terms were. VAGUE CONTRACTS ARE PROBLEMATIC CONTRACTS

Breeder might later deny he gave permission to breed or to show it. Or, the dog “turns out” to have several undesirable inheritable conditions, but Buyer wants to bred it anyway, denying there was any condition about it turning out. • Second, what does “it’s yours” mean? When it’s time to register the puppy, will Breeder say, “I will be co- owner because (a) that’s how I always do it, (b) that’s how everyone does it or (c) I have the papers and you don’t.” This is known to happen and it creates huge problems stemming from unwanted and poorly formed co-ownerships. • Third, what does “if it turns out” mean? Who decides whether the puppy turned out? And at what age is it decided? Who pays for health testing that the Breeder demands? And if he doesn’t “turn out,” what happens? Does the dog get neutered? Does Breeder take him back and give Buyer another one? • Fourth, “you can show and breed” is extremely vague. The parties have no guidance on who pays entries, who pays for a handler, or whether Breeder can handle the dog himself. Similarly, assuming the parties get the dog finished, they still have no framework for issues like when can it be bred; who picks the breeding part- ner; and if female, who pays stud fees, and who owns the puppies. This particular kind of dispute over a bitch often ends up with the Breeder refusing to sign off the litter—either for spite, or until he gets a puppy back (or whatever else he may be seeking). Vague contracts with unanswered questions like these cause many disputes over show dogs. However, even if the parties do have a full discussion andmake a detailed agree- ment about the dog’s future, the same type of questions arise when the parties fail to put their agreement in writ- ing. People forget what they said; they wish they made a dif- ferent deal; they refuse to admit what they agreed to. Not being able to prove what your agreement was is almost as bad as never having made the agreement in the first place.

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GROUP PLACING GCHB JEMS CHICAGO FIRE

“THIS FAMILY

Burns Deep”

THANK YOU JUDGE DR. ADAM KING FOR BLAZE'S RECENT GROUP PLACEMENT AMONG SOME VERY LOVELY TOYS.

BRED, OWNED, & HANDLED BY JESSICA SIMON - JEM CHIHUAHUAS JemChis@gmail.com

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RESOLVING THE ISSUES: COSTLY AND DIFFICULT The AKC is usually no help in these issues: it is a pedigree registry, not a forum for ownership or breeder/buyer disputes. Breed clubs, similarly, have no role in such disputes unless, perhaps, one party has transgressed the club’s ethical code; even then, the complaints usually go nowhere. Sometimes the disputes go to court, which usually means each side will spendmore than the puppy cost, and the puppywill be past breeding age by the time the dispute is resolved—if it ever is. Frequently, such disputes are never fully resolved. As a result, the dog may be neither shown nor bred, while the parties end up with lingering hard feelings and lifelong grudges (even vendettas) played out in social media forums and/or at dog shows. Evenwithout a court trial or AKC bench committee, a dog-related dispute can be “tried” in the “court of public opinion” in this fashion. The loser in such a battle is often forced to pay a high price in terms of reputation. AVOIDING THE PROBLEMS IN THE FIRST PLACE To minimize such problems, a few common sense rules apply. Rule #1: Know your state laws regarding puppy sales and consumer fraud as it applies to the sale of dogs. If you don’t know the law or how to follow it, consult a lawyer. Rule #2: When you plan to sell a show prospect, write out a list of “what ifs,” including every nightmare you can imagine with a co-owner on a show prospect that would feel like a real “deal breaker” to you. For exam- ple: What if the buyers refuse to show or breed it; they don’t give it proper vet care; they use it to breed “designer dogs”; they sell it to someone else without telling you; they spay or neuter it without telling you; they move five states away; they die or become permanently disabled? Then read your contract again (or start to write one, if you don’t have one). See if your contract addresses those topics. Ideally, your contract (a) prohibits the buyer’s actions that would cause the trouble, (b) mandates what must happen, and (c) carries a substantial and clear negative result when the wrong thing happens, for example, if Buyer breeds the dog without your permission, you have the right to reclaim the dog and receive $5,000 in liquidated damages. If you don’t set forth the liquidated damages, you will probably have to go to court to prove your damages. Of course, you need to be sure the remedies you put in your contract are allowable under law, so you should consult an attorney versed in dog law, to finalize your contract. Having a discussion about all eventualities that could occur is a good way to find out some new facts about your prospective buyer and their expecta- tions. Better to learn this before they take possession of your show pros- pect puppy, than after. It’s been said that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This certainly applies to selling show prospects. Do your homework, and have those difficult discussions with your prospective buyer before you place your pride and joy in their care, potentially losing that dog as an oppor- tunity to perpetuate your breeding program. The little effort it takes to prepare a proper contract is small compared to what you stand to lose if the sale of a show prospect goes bad.

DO YOUR HOMEWORK, AND HAVE THOSE DIFFICULT DISCUSSIONS WITH YOUR PROSPECTIVE BUYER BEFORE YOU PLACE YOUR PRIDE AND JOY IN THEIR CARE, POTENTIALLY LOSING THAT DOG AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO PERPETUATE YOUR BREEDING PROGRAM.

LisaCurry represents clients in state and federal courts and before the AKC. She also raises and shows AKC dogs. You can review her articles at www.lawfordogs.com. Lisa can be reached at 201-400-7407 or LCurry@lawfordogs.com.

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*

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/21

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THE SECOND TIME AROUND by Pat Bullard

W hat would you change if you could start all over in the dog world? I imagine I’m not the only one who has been given a second chance. Life takes us away from our passion and sometimes brings us back again. Sometimes other respon- sibilities or unexpected changes take us away, and sometimes tragedy. In my case, it was a tragic car accident on our way home from the Ravenna, Ohio, shows in August of 1991. Up to that point, I had been campaigning Maltese specials and had just begun my breed- ing program, but after the accident I left the sport for many years. In 2012, when the last of my old line was geriatric, I put a post on social media asking if any of my Maltese friends could help me find a puppy. Fortunately, I got an answer right away from my most trusted and respected friends in the breed, TaraMartin Row- ell and Vicki Abbott of Scylla Maltese. All I asked for was a pet puppy since I’d never had the courage to go in the ring myself in the old days. The puppy they sent me was a joyful little guy and he awakened my passion for the show world again. I asked if I might learn to show by showing him, and off we went to training class. Even though I had a history of success in our breed from the past, it didn’t change that, as a handler, I was a rank novice. So much has changed in the grooming world since my old days. New products and new methods have had to be mastered but, most of all, overcoming the anxiety and nervous- ness of being an exhibitor has been a huge challenge. Standing beside me and behind me with untold support are my mentors, Tara and Vicki. I should also add that I was 60 years old when I began my second chance, and I can no longer hear.

Scylla’s Small Kraft Sky Kisses and Pat Bullard

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realize I am competing with others who have dreams just as important as mine. Their passions run just as deep and their wins are their dreams come true. My comrades are trying as hard as I am and are as tired as I am on Sunday morning. I’m sure we all say the same thing to ourselves, “I made it!” It’s hard to keep showing once we know where we stand with our com- petition at a show, but continuing to show up when we knowwe don’t stand a chance of winning is the true test of sportsmanship. An honest and sin- cere congratulations to the winners will be something none of us ever re- grets. Don’t be discouraged if no one is there to congratulate your win. Pat yourself on the back and be kinder than ever to your comrades. They are disappointed and will recover given a bit of time. Monday always feels bet- ter than Sunday afternoon. One thing that hasn’t changed from my first trip around the block is my support of our breed club, The Ameri- can Maltese Association. I can’t do the same jobs I did in the old days without my hearing, but there are still many contributions I can make to our club. I’ve been one of the administra- tors for our social media page for the past three years and it’s been a good marketing tool for our club. It’s also given me the opportunity to commu- nicate with others in our breed in a fo- rum where I can read every word and not have to hear or read lips. The second time around is even bet- ter than the first. Having a lifetime to ponder and make mistakes, I’ve come to a place that is rewarding. Striving for something keeps our hopes and dreams alive. Loving our dogs and our breed gives comfort to our hearts. Mentoring others gives us hope for the future. Knowing our history and pedigrees gives a better insight into making breeding decisions. Knowing what we want gives us the courage to stand for what we believe even if we stand alone. Being a novice owner handler isn’t a bad thing. Instead, it is an admission that we are students each day of our lives.

“ONE THING THAT HASN’T CHANGED FROM MY FIRST TRIP AROUND THE BLOCK IS MY SUPPORT OF OUR BREED CLUB, The American Maltese Association.”

Our first show was in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and a fellow exhibitor agreed to meet me the night before to show me how to put up 21st century style topknots. My little guy took sec- ond in his class the first day, and I was so nervous I missed going back into the ring for Reserve. We had better luck at our next show and picked up a couple of single points. That first boy finished with three majors, the last being five points, and I’d already begun dreaming of coming back to breeding by that time. I’ve already said how much I respect and treasure my mentors, but it was at this point that I did some hard think- ing about how I wanted to change from the first time around, how much time I have left to be a productive contributor to the Maltese through breeding, and what would happen to the programwhen I am no longer able to continue. That is when I “saw the light” and realized the best contri- bution I could make would be to join forces with those I respect so highly and do my best to protect our breed and their line. At that point, we found our foundation bitch in Germany and laid plans and dreamed dreams of our future together. As I write, I’ve finished five champi- ons, put two grand championships on our dogs, and our first litter of two are

both grand champions and all three of the Maltese I showed in 2016 were ranked in the top 15 NOHS Maltese. At this point, I became very inter- ested in competing in the NOHS and started the year with a BIS that took our girl to NOHS #1 Maltese. Now I look for shows offering NOHS, but this is all that’s changed. We still average one show weekend a month. I mentioned earlier that I am deaf, but I also have many old nagging injuries, and who doesn’t when approach- ing the age of 65? My dear husband makes it possible for me to live my passion, and for that and so many other things I am eternally grateful. I am also grateful for the stewards and judges of our sport who make ac- commodations for all of us with dis- abilities. I learned right away from the stewards that they will always be happy to inform the judge of any ex- hibitor’s disabilities. I let the steward knowwhen I pick upmy armband. Af- ter a while, most of the stewards and judges know without a reminder. It’s also very helpful to watch the judge’s ring procedure in other breeds before your own judging time. Since I’ve been given a second chance in the sport my heart feels differently, too. In the old days, I was ferociously competitive and it was hard to lose. None of us likes losing, but now, I

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THE COMING OF BUSBY

by Kate Gilpin

I brought home my first dog when I was sixty. I had fallen in love with Bouviers, and got a baby male, Steinway; Aristes Fred Stein- way, in fact. He grew to be enormous, and I did many things with him, including show- ing him in obedience, doing therapy visits with him, and getting him a much younger playmate to inspire him in his old age. That second Bouvier, a female I named Poppy, died in 2019. And I—a withered, shrunken little crone living on a fixed income—discov- ered that, without a huge dog, I actually had enough money to live on. I took from this [realization] the lesson that I needed to get a Toy dog. I searched and studied, and finally arrived at the Affenpin- scher—especially funny since I later found out that quite a lot of veteran Bouvier own- ers downsize to Affens when the time comes. (They have some common traits; they’re of- ten dark, they have hair that grows, they’re smart, and they’re extremely confident.) But Affens are a tenth the size of Bouviers. Quick example: A Bouvier eats something around a quart of food every day, while the Affen man- ages on a half cup. “That’s not food,” I said, “That’s medicine.” I was immensely lucky to find a nine-month- old Affen boy from reputable breeders, one of whom took the last plane, pretty much, before the pandemic lockdown to bring him to me. Coachlight & High Noon’s Busby Berkeley arrived at my house onMarch 11, 2020. Since then, I have found him an ideal companion. He’s whip-smart, darling to look at, high- spirited, and cooperative. The breed is fre- quently described as “famously funny,” with a gait of “comic seriousness.” The French call Affenpinschers “mustachioed little devils.”

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in the Tristan and Isolde myth, who took away all sorrow and replaced it with joy. Busby—my little fairy Affen, a comedian in a matchbox.

The cat looked exactly like Queen Victoria observing Jerry Lewis. Since then, they’ve come to share my bed with me, and they often chase each other. Busby leaves the room in hot pursuit of Buki, and aminute later they return, this time with Buki as the chaser. Busby defends the house against the mail—and the mailman. Steinway used to do that, too. I can tell you that the Bouvier’s booming bark com- pared to the Affenpinscher’s soprano trill is like the Conquest of White Fang compared to a garden gnome in a tutu. (And I mean a gnome twirling a cocktail umbrella.) I can’t imagine how I missed this breed until now. Busby is a priceless, affectionate Fabergé egg. He has a repertoire of frequent vocalizations, including what I call conversational grunts. Not a bark—certainly not a growl—but a sort of ongoing commen- tary on the events of his day. I may train him for nursing home visits as the pandemic recedes. I’m sure he would brighten the day for anybody in a place like that. What- ever he does, he is like themagical dog

All this is enhanced by their passion for toys. Busby has a stable of, may- be, a dozen and a half toys. His cur- rent favorite is a miniature stuffed sloth. Busby adores Slothie, along with Green Bone, Lil Lion, Pink Pig, Porky, and more. The toys are stored in a floor-level shelf in my small of- fice. In the morning, Busby will start a process of taking one of these jew- els into my study and leaving it there. Throughout the day, individual toys continue to be purposefully carried into that room. By the evening, there are, perhaps, a dozen of them strewn around. Busby then takes them, puts them into a pile, and finishes by lying on top of them, gnawing his rawhide bone. He might as well be rolling in gold coins on a silken bed. On the day Busby arrived, he was in- troduced to my cat, Buki, who had spent his entire thirteen years with massive Bouviers. I suspect Buki didn’t recognize Busby as a dog. Busby knocked himself out from the beginning to persuade Buki that they should be playmates. He did play bows and three-ring aerial twirls while Buki sat a few feet away and watched.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Kate Gilpin is a writer, pianist, teacher, and political observer. She is a native Californian and a longtime resident of the San Francisco Bay Area. She re- cently made the transition from Bou- viers to an Affenpinscher, and is an enthusiastic learner. Her Persian cat has decided that the Affenpinscher is acceptable, even if he is too small to be a dog. T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 37

ABLE SANDERLIN READY WILLING N ABLE FIRST SHOW AND THE WINNER IS.......

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WINNER OF THE 2021 MINIATURE PINSCHER TOP 20 JUDGES: AKC LICENSED JUDGE GARY ANDERSON, BREEDER JUDGE MARVIN STRASSBURG, & EXHIBITOR/HANDLER JUDGE JENNA DALTON.

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T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 39

BACK TO BASICS… IT’S TIME by Jacqueline L. Stacy

T ime? Yes, it’s time to step back and take a good, long, hard look at the Affenpinschers that are being shown in the ring today. What is being bred, shown, promoted, and rewarded today will influence the direc- tion the breed takes tomorrow.Wemust, as breed preservationists, ob- jectively evaluate that direction. All breeders, exhibitors (handlers includ- ed), and judges must have the strength and courage to maintain BREED TYPE and reverse the direction the breed is currently taking. We aremov- ing away frommoderation and forward toward exaggeration. We must en- sure that “Affens” stay looking like Affens, not caricatures of Affens. MODERATION is repeatedly stated—seven times, actually—in the AKC breed Standard, approved June 12, 2000, and the descriptions provided in the Standard set the breed type. References made include forequarters, hindquarters, chest, and front/rear angulation. The tuck-up is described as “slight.” Exaggeration is now seen frequently in these areas and is, un- fortunately, being rewarded. It is erroneous and detrimental to this breed to promote exaggeration as this corrupts breed type. Here are just a few examples to illustrate this point regarding moderation as referenced in the Standard: Chest: Is moderately broad and deep; ribs are moderately sprung. Forequarters: Front angulation is moderate. Shoulders—with moderate layback. Hindquarters: Rear angulation is moderate tomatch the front. Hind legs straight when viewed from behind. From the side, hind legs are set under the body tomaintain a square appearance. Hocks—moderately angulated. From this, one should deduce that this makes for a short LEVEL back, which can still have a barely perceptible curve at the croup. In an over-angulated front (more thanmoderate layback of shoulders), the whole front assembly moves away fromAffen type. Choosing exaggerated angles and layback for the breed allows for a longer neck while bringing the humerus further back under the body. This puts the elbows in conflict with the rib cage, and can lead to a wider front and elbows that must move out to avoid the ribs, making for unsound gate. The longer neck, coupled with exaggerated shoulder angles, prevents the presence of the “short ver- tical neck” as described in the Standard. When hindquarters are exaggerated, the dog will have a sloping topline, standing with the hindlegs stretched out behind the rear. Or they may ap- pear to be standing on their hocks rather than on their feet, moving with

Near perfection for head and expression; eye shape, color, set, nose, lower lip line. Neat but shaggy appearance.

Eyes round, full, medium size, not prominent.

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AFFENPINSCHER Priorities of Type • Monkey-Like Expression • Preferred Height 9 ½ Inches- 11 ½ Inches • Square Appearance, Bitches May Be Longer • Hindlegs Set Under the Body • Substance - Must Be Sturdy • Temperament is Comical, Inquisitive • Gait is Sound, Tracking 4-Square, Converging with Speed • Coat is Harsh, Neat but Shaggy

hocks so over-angulated they look as if sickled. When this ex- aggerated rear angulation is coupled with a moderate front, the rear must swing around to avoid interference with the front legs when the dog is in motion. Remember, movement is to be light and free, sometimes de- scribed as jaunty. Neither excessive reach and drive nor hack- neyed gaits are called for in the Standard. Assessingmovement matters. Affens can and should be SOUND. When they are bred to the Standard they will have “light, free, sound, bal- anced, confident [movement]… legs move parallel to each other [and]…converge toward amidline as speed increases. Unsound gait is to be heavily penalized.” A fast, ground-covering gait is not compatible with breed type, and should not be rewarded. Connecting the dots from the Standard thus far, we have a “squarish” appearing, sturdy, compact Toy dog with medium bone, withMODERATION asked for seven times. Not once is an attribute described as exaggerated. Now, onto coat and presentation. Yes, style is style and may well be just a current fad, BUT when is enough enough? NOW! We know the hair should be dense, rough, and harsh on the body and shoulders, about an inch long, and somewhat shorter on the tail and rear, with furnishings longer and less harsh. According to the Standard, which sets the breed type, in the mature adult a cape or mane of strong hair is to blend into the back coat at theWITHERS. This is where the current problem with breed type in grooming begins. Where does the Standard speak to building up a long-arched neck starting at the middle of the back; backcombing, spraying up much like a Poodle all the way to the back of the skull? I have looked and looked and can’t find it anywhere. So, back to my point about Back to Basics—the Affen itself (and in its appearance) should be MODERATE in every way. I agree that this presentation is somewhat attractive, but what it creates in the overall view and outline is in direct conflict with the Standard. It may give the appearance of a short back, but also promotes a ski sloped topline, a long neck, and great exaggeration. On a positive note, coat color, tails, and ears have improved. It’s so nice to have the essence of themonkey-like expression pres- ent and rewarded very often. The distance between the eyes is to be approximately the length of the muzzle; a well-defined stop, finishing-off to a blunt nose, with open nares set straight and tipping neither up nor down. The nose and eye rims must be BLACK. To achieve the monkey-like expres,,sion, the eyes themselves must be medium in size, round, dark, and bril- liant, and set in the middle of the skull without corners or set obliquely. A prominent lower lip line is the icing on the cake. Color is a near non-issue now. Breeders are more interested in color and accept that color continues to change on the “dogs of color” over their lifetime. Most judges have accepted color, as well they should, since the Standard does not discriminate against it. The grooming of heads on most is really improving; there is less backcombing, hair spray, and product used. Leaving the hair more natural rather than so “done up” does help get to the oxymoron in the Standard that says they should have a “neat but shaggy appearance.”

Illustration by Anne M. Hier

Proper profile as shown in the Affenpinscher Club of America, Inc. Illustrated Standard. Illustration by Anne M. Hier

Prepared and published by the Affenpinscher Club of America, Inc. copyright 2011 For a copy of this publication, please contact the Affenpinscher Club of America, Inc. Corresponding Secretary www.affenpinscher.org

T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 41

C H WY N S ON L I T T L E B L AC K D R E S S CH MARLORD’S MORE SMORES PLEASE “SMORES” X CH WYNSON’S LITTLE SPARROW “SPARROW” Tiffany

MOVEMENT CANDIDS BY PHYLLIS ENSLEY

BILL AND DIANA CHAPMAN, WYNSONDOG@HOTMAIL.COM WYNSON DOGS ARE EXPERTLY AND BEAUTIFULLY PRESENTED BY RHETT BOCKMAN AND MICHAEL LOBINSKE

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WYNSON ITALIAN GREYHOUNDS

Xena

WYNSON ’ S WARR I OR PR I NCESS

CH WYNSON THE PARTY STARTS HERE “PALOOZA” x CH WYNSON’S CRYSTAL PRINCESS “CRYSTAL”

Khaki

WYNSON ’ S KHAK I JEANS CH WYNSON’S DASHING IN DENIM “DASH” x CH WYNSON’S LITTLE SPARROW “SPARROW”

BILL AND DIANA CHAPMAN, WYNSONDOG@HOTMAIL.COM WYNSON DOGS ARE EXPERTLY AND BEAUTIFULLY PRESENTED BY RHETT BOCKMAN AND MICHAEL LOBINSKE

T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 43

Left: An example of good body-length to leg-length to depth-of-body. Right: A bitch with a well-maintained shaggy but neat appearance. This correct coat needs little grooming to blend the various lengths of hair.

No. This is exaggerated in many ways. Exces- sive rear angulation, sloping topline; front assembly far too forward; groomed to excess.

Less than ideal; over-angulated rear; severe underline; short on leg; front heavy; over-groomed.

No. Such an appealing image. Correct? No, note exaggerated rear angulation.

Don’t be misled with what I have written. When I judge, I must see the entire outline of the dog, its shape, make, head and expression, and groomed—but not over- groomed to the point that it affects breed type. I agree that “fancy” is very, very appealing, but it is wrong, wrong, wrong for an Affen. Let’s revert a bit so that the

unique features of the Affenpinscher will prevail. This breed is amazing and, if we leave well enough alone, it should flourish for many, many years to come. Please jump on this train! One of the great beauties of the breed is its unique fea- tures. Please help us preserve them.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Jacqueline Stacy has been involved in purebred dogs for over 50 years, starting as an exhibitor, then breeder, then all-breed professional handler and, ultimately, as a much sought after AKC All-Breed judge. Under the Tamarin Kennel, reg prefix, she and her husband, Terry, have bred and shown Affenpinschers since 1998 and have produced over 100 champions and multiple Best in Showwinners &National Specialty winners, including the top-winning BISAmerican- Bred Champion, Ch. Tamarin Tug, who also became America’s Top Toy Dog. Their dogs have been the foundation for several successful Affenpinscher Kennels that are active today. She has been a member of the ACA since 1998, has served as their Newsletter Editor, Board Director and President of the Club for six years. She and her committee authored the ACA Illustrated Standard that was prepared and published by the Club in 2011. She is a member of the committee to create Judges Education for the Canine College. She is passionate about Affenpinschers and preserving Breed Type.

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ACCEPTABLE COLORS OF THE AFFENPINSCHER AND DOCKED OR NATURAL TAIL

by Cameron Riegel

COLOR: BLACK, GRAY, SILVER, RED, BLACK AND TAN, OR BEIGE ARE ALL ACCEPTABLE. B lacks may have a rusty cast or a few white or silver hairs mixed with the black. Reds may vary from a brownish red to an orangey tan. Belge has black, brown, and/or white hairs mixed with the red. With various colors, the furnishings may be a bit lighter. Some dogs may have black masks. A small white spot on the chest is not pe- nalized, but large white patches are undesirable. Color is not a major consideration. It is important to note here that ALL colors are EQUALLY acceptable and should be given equal consideration. CORRECT TAILS AND CARRIAGE Tail may be docked or natural. A docked tail is generally between one and two inches long, set high, and carried erect. The natural tail is set high and carried curved gently up over the back while moving. The type of tail is not a major consideration.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR I am Cameron Riegel, Judge #105311, and have been as- sociated with purebred dogs since the young age of seven. I lived on the Navajo Reservation near Thoreau, NewMexico, for many years, where we owned and bred German Shepherds. I moved to Texas in my early adult years where I bred Poo- dles, Cocker Spaniels, and Saint Bernards. Yes, quite a collec- tion, but I’ve enjoyed them all. In 1979, I moved to Albuquer- que, New Mexico, where I be- came an owner of my first Bou- vier des Flandres, and I’ve been an avid owner and breeder until now. I also brought into the mix my “old man dog” to retire with, the Affenpinscher, which I have owned, shown, and bred now for the past 15 years. I have become a judge for the American Kennel Club where I currently judge breeds in the Toy Group, Herding Group, and the Non-Sporting Group. Judg- ing has become such a joy and I hope to continue well into my retirement years. If you see me out at a show, be sure to stop by and say hello. T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 45

Two Examples of Red Affens, One with a Black Mask and One Without

Example of Black

Examples of Black and Tan

Belge is aMixture of Black, Brown and/or White Hairs Mixed with the Red

Examples of Silver and/or Gray

OWN E D & L OV E D BY : PAU L A MC C OMB & MAR I NA P E R S I C L E H N

B R E D BY : MAR I NA P E R S I C L E H N

RBISOH GCH ARTISTY’S BILLY THE KID GCH DEE LITTLE WHOS YOUR DADDY ROM x CH MOUNTAIN CREST PRESIDENTIAL AFFAIR

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T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 47

Havanese Club of America Regional Specialty #1 Judge: Mr. Timothy Catterson

Havanese Club of America National Specialty Judge: Mr. Robert E. Hutton

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BISS GCHS CH THAT’S FIRE POWER AT ENGINUITY F lint Owned by: Arlene Liebing, Alissa Welling & Mya Welling Presented by: Alissa Welling

Havanese Club of America Regional Specialty #2 Judge: Dr. Steve Keating

T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 49

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T op N otch T oys , J une 2021 • 51

AN AFFENPINSCHER IN YOUR HOME? by Linda Pollack, Columnist, Affenpinscher Club of America GET READY!

I nviting an Affenpinscher into your home is akin to inviting a willful, in- telligent being from another planet to take up permanent residence within your walls, and within your heart. The “Affen” makes his or her needs known from the very begin- ning of your relationship. You’d bet- ter catch on quickly that the Affen is more humanoid, with more personal- ity, than one would imagine possible from a monkey-like creature that weighs less than ten pounds. Having had the good fortune to own wonderful dogs of all sizes and breeds, I learned within a few days of getting my Chloe that you don’t own an Affen, he or she owns you. You either relin- quish your alpha position for the joy of seeing the pleasure it gives the Affen to feel in charge, or you resign your- self to a lifetime of power struggles. Regardless of your decision, the Affen will take complete control. Remember Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs from Psych 101, the motiva- tional theory that is diagrammed like a pyramid with needs (physiological, safety, love/belonging, esteem, and self-actualization) positioned like rungs on a ladder? The theory was meant to address human needs, but since Affens are the most human dog you’ll ever meet, the pyramid is use- ful in understanding what matters to them. Almost 12 years of relatively constant contact has taught me a lot about having an Affen in your home, but Chloe still teaches me every day.

And she has taught me that for Affens, the Hierarchy of Needs pyramid is completely upside down. SELF-ACTUALIZATION Knowing that its adorableness will ensure that all basic needs are always met, the Affen is most concerned with self-actualization. The Affen wants to achieve full potential in everything. This dog doesn’t just want to be the best version of him or her self, but the best dog possible. Such desire doesn’t come across as a wish to please so much as a desire to outshine all other dog relationships you have—or will ever have had. ESTEEM The Affen, born with high self-es- teem, takes his or herself very seri- ously. He or she wants to be respected for strength, despite not being exactly strong. Sturdy? Well, that depends. Agile? Oh yes! Stamina and endur- ance? Yes, depending upon what the situation requires and for how long it is required. But strong? Those little legs are about the size of a thick pencil and the little head slightly larger than a golf ball. I would say an Affen is the opposite of strong—except in person- ality. However, the Affen is complete- ly unaware of any physical discrepan- cies in the strength department. With a few well-timed barks, he or she can project an aura of fierceness sufficient to make a dog ten times its size quiv- er. But barking is reserved only for

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“HIGHLY SENSITIVE TO EMOTIONALLY CHARGED ENVIRONMENTS, THE AFFEN WANTS EVERYONE HAPPY ALL THE TIME.”

serious communication alerts such as “Daddy” arriving home, the mail- man, the UPS truck whizzing by, a ringing phone or doorbell, and a dog playing in the park across the street. No whining or yipping, ever, but you may find yourself on the receiving end of a scream or two if you are not where you are supposed to be when you are supposed to be there. Other communications include chortles, baby ground hog noises, a gentle nose knocking at the ankle if lunch is late, a slight cock of the head when trying to understand a word or requesting a run when a good stretch of grass is in sight. Remember how Lassie used to communicate with anyone whowould listen? Affens are as communicative and interactive as a trained movie star dog. Maybe more so! LOVE AND BELONGING Regarding love, the Affen doesn’t show the neediness evident in some small dogs, but nevertheless craves love. The sense of connection with the primary caretaker is paramount, but there is plenty of love in an Affen’s heart to dispense to other members of the family. Separation anxiety can arise if everyone in the Affen’s pack, especially the primary caregiver, isn’t visible. Consequently, the primary caretaker can find him or her self reorganizing life so that the Affen is always present. This may be for both the Affen’s and the caretaker’s sense of well-being. This may also be so because life is just more fun and in- teresting with an Affen by your side. Regardless, the Affen wants to be an active member of the family—includ- ed in everything, connected to all. In return, the Affen will keep you enter- tained with his or her wicked sense of humor and constant antics. As for friendships with other dogs, once Chloe lost contact with her true love, a Chihuahua named Santiago, she

protection of the trachea with a soft harness is critical. Luxation of the patella might be a problem, but can be surgically corrected if severe. Dry eyes might require daily Tacrolimus drops. A suspiciously breed-related allergy to chicken may evidence in dry, itchy skin. Vaccines can be tricky. Never, ever bundle them. Never give a leptospirosis vaccine. Chloe had a bad reaction to the rabies vaccine, so those were eliminated early. Even heartworm preventative caused an allergic reaction, so blood tests every six months manage that dreaded pos- sibility. Thankfully, Affens live for- ever. At least that’s what I tell myself every day. PHYSIOLOGICAL Finally, the most basic of basic needs, although there is nothing basic about an Affen that deserves—and will demand—the best. A typical Chloe day includes: Fresh food plated on a snuffle mat to encourage her foraging skills; only Fiji water, ever; thick beds with soft blankets for luxurious sleep; lots of fresh air on long walks under beautiful trees; and other creatures to observe. Most importantly, all of the Affen’s physiological needs should be pro- vided in a stimulating routine; new streets to explore, new smells, and new people all encased in a familiar schedule. If Chloe’s long morning walk or car ride is postponed for any reason, she isn’t pleased. She knows how things are supposed to go, and if they don’t go in the correct order, she tries to get things back on track with nudges. This, however, doesn’t mean she can’t go with the flowwhen neces- sary. She can be flexible. She just likes her routine and doesn’t want to ever be bored. You won’t be bored, either, if you have an Affen in your home. You will be in for the relationship of a lifetime. Lucky you!

was finished with dogs. Other Affens may be able to love again. Not Chloe. SAFETY Those basic needs that the Affen knows will always be covered? Safety is critical on two levels. Psychologi- cally, the Affen needs to feel secure at all times. Despite high self-esteem, somewhere in that smart, little brain, the Affen knows he or she is depen- dent. Highly sensitive to emotion- ally charged environments, the Affen wants everyone happy all the time. This is impossible to achieve, but knowing how much it matters to your dog can help keep chaos at bay. If the Affen is an only dog, he or she may not want to see you petting or even talking to another dog. TheAffen may demonstrate jealousy by barking or turning his or her head so that the disloyalty isn’t observed. That’s what Chloe does, knowing full well I will follow up any perceived betrayal with a reminder that she ismuch cuter than that little puppy or muchmore beauti- ful than the perfectly groomed dog we just passed. She knows she is the best and only dog I love. She eventually forgives me. The Affen takes the job of guard seri- ously, but can only do so if he or she already feels protected. It’s not a good idea to have an Affen in a household with small children. As much as the Affen resembles a stuffed toy, a child will soon discover that this isn’t the case. A child wanting to play with a dog’s possessions could be acciden- tally harmed. An Affen could be acci- dentally harmed by a child’s attempts at play. The Affen is potentially frag- ile, as is the child. If the home in- cludes children under age six, it’s bet- ter to have a dog that won’t mind if its ears and tail are pulled. Most Affens will mind. The Affen has relatively few po- tential health problems of which to be aware. As with all small dogs,

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