Showsight Presents the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

WHAT’S UNDER THAT COAT?

Below is one more example of the build-up of hair over withers (Fig. 4a & 4b). This is used to create the illusion of a shorter back, although in this case, not so successfully. The lack of balance is further destroyed by the fact that the dog is low on leg, certainly not helped by excessive coat left on the undercarriage. Taking a brief look at the correct Wheaten head, many that we see in the ring today are thick with coarse backskulls that form a three-dimensional block (width, length, depth) instead of a neat, clean brick (narrow, long, and lean) (Fig. 5). Heads tend to be square rather than rectangular. Skull and muzzle should both be rectangular, equal in length and on equal planes. Ide- ally, the skull should be easily spanned by a woman’s hand. The two photos (Fig. 6a & 6b) taken from the front cannot take into account the foreshortening of muzzle; but hopefully, they project that the width of the head should be approximately half the length of the head and, also, that the muzzle should not “fall off ” or lose width to any appreciable degree. It is hoped that those reading this article will be inspired toward more thoughtful judging (and breed- ing) of the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, understand- ing as well that much of it can be applied to other coat- ed breeds, notably the Kerry Blue Terrier.

Heads tend to be square rather than rectangular. Skull and muzzle should both be rectangular, equal in length and on equal planes. Ideally, the skull should be easily spanned by a woman’s hand.

Length, point of shoulder to pin bone Height, withers to ground

Withers to brisket Elbow to ground

Figure 4b

Figure 4a

Figure 5

Figure 6a

Figure 6b

268 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SPRING EDITION

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