Showsight September 2020

G C H P 2 C I N N I B O N ’ S B E D R O C K B OMB S H E L L

# 3 ALL BREEDS * AMONG # 1 WORKING * # 1 BREED *

OWNED BY KEITH & CHERYL ROBBINS DAVE BERREY

DEBORAH CAYWOOD BONNIE WAGAMAN BRED BY BONNIE WAGAMAN CINNIBON BOXERS NICOLE MANNA HANDLED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

HISTORY IN THE MAKING THANK YOU JUDGES WE ARE HONORED AND GRATEFUL

*AKC STATS AS OF 7/31/20 BOXER

ARecord winner of 6 Best in Specialt y shows in 2 0 19 ! Our sincere appreciation to all the judges who has recognized his qualities.

Owners Regis Prado & Frank Cl apsaddle Regi sPr adoMa lt e s e .com Handled by Pat Keen Fernande s Evaristo M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N D I R R A U S

©NOR CAL BULLDOGGER 2019

DESIGN BY Katie Gochev GRAPHICS

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MALTESE

ado IFC.indd 1

# 2 M A L E

M A LT E S E

*

in 2019 in 6 short months as a special!

*AKC all breed stats as of 7/31/20

©NOR CAL BULLDOGGER 2019

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*

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 7/31/20 AFFENPINSCHER

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PROTOCOL I CAME I SAW I SPARKLED

WINNER OF

BEST IN SHOWS

Owned by MR. KENCHI KATO & CAROLYN AUSTIN Bred & Owned by KEVIN & JOCELYN MULLINS Handled by ANDY LINTON

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

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FRENCH BULLDOG

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MALTESE

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BORZOI

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CHINESE SHAR-PEI

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*

*

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*AKC STATS AS OF 7/31/20 POODLE (MINIATURE)

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GCHG Cerise Bonanza Following A Strong Family Tradition

CeriseEnglishSpringerSpaniels.com SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

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Number One Sporting Dog * Number One English Springer Spaniel **

handled by Howard Huber

bred & owned by Dorothy Cherry

CeriseEnglishSpringerSpaniels.com *AKC ALL-BREED STATS AS OF 7/31/2020

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OUR SI NCERE APPRECIAT ION TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAV E RECOGN I ZED OUR EXCI T I NG R I SI NG STAR WI NSTON. THE BEST I S Y ET TO COME . . .

F O R W I N S T O N ’ S R E C E N T B R E E D W I N A T T H E L A C K AWA N N A K E N N E L C L U B S H OW I N B L O OM S B U R G , P A . THANK YOU TO JUDGE ELA INE LESSIG

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

Owned by John and Donna Duda

Bred by Paul and Deb Brooks Depaws Kennel

Presented by Michelle Wolcott 570-656-2218

© Rick Brickley Photography

BRONZE GRAND CHAMPION

G C H P 2 C R K O N T H E D O U B L E X G C H D E P A W S M S . Z O E Y D O B 0 8 / 3 1 / 1 8 WI STON D E P A W ’ S P L A Y T O W I N

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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GCHS BARBERRY HILLWOOD HOT CHILD IN THE CITY

ALWAYS BREEDER/OWNER HANDLED BREEDERS/OWNERS ELLEN M. CHARLES, LISA BETTIS, PAULA & MATT ABBOTT

BREEDER PAULA HENDRICKS

HANDLER LISA BETTIS

ASSISTED BY NATALIE TAYLOR

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BICHON FRISE

STAY

STAY

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BronzeGrandChampion GEMINI’S ROCK N’ ROLL FANTASY V INTRIGUE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

THANK YOU GENA BOX-YOUNG FOR THE BEST IN SHOW SPECIALTY WIN

owned & co-bred by MELISSA BATES

beautiful ly presented by NICOLE TORRE

bred by KIM LOVETT, GEMINI & MELISSA BATES, INTRIGUE

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© HAN 2020

2 019 N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R

B I S, M R B I S, M B I S S, G C H G SilverLakes THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS

C G C A, T K A

BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLERS: BARBARA & DR. GARY MCNEILL

BREEDERS OF MERIT OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 405-833-1774 SILVERLAKEGSPS.COM

© HAN 2020

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

© HAN 2020

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OCEANO DARBYDALE’S XECUTIVE DECISION

“Grateful for all the Judges who have recognized Xander, for the friends made along the way, and for the love shared for this sport.”

FROM THIS...

LOVED & OWNED BY: KATHY WORTHAM • CO-OWNED BY: MARY W. PRICE & CAROL BERGMANN

*ALL SYSTEMS AS OF 7/31/20

**AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7/31/20

***AKC STATS AS OF 7/31/20

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NEWFOUNDLAND

CELEBRATING THE FIRST

GRAND CHAMPION NEWFOUNDLAND IN BREED HISTORY TO THIS!!!

# 1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL SYSTEMS 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 * NEWFOUNDLANDCLUBOF AMERICA TOP SHOWDOG 2017, 2018 & 2019 TOP 10WORKINGDOG 2017, 2018 & 2019 *** TOP 20 ALL BREEDS 2017, 2018 & 2019 ** 29 BEST IN SHOWS 2XNATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNER 2017 & 2018

27 BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWS 22 RESERVE BEST IN SHOWS 127 GROUP ONES 291 GROUP PLACEMENTS

OWNED AND PRESENTED BY: KIM & GIGI GRIFFITH • BRED BY: GIGI GRIFFITH & CAROL BERGMANN

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POODLE (STANDARD)

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AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER 1.512.541.8128, AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM HANIFA ARAPOVIC CO-OWNER & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1.512.686.3466, HANIFA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM MICHAEL VERAS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER 1.512.893.6906, MICHAEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, HEAD OF DIGITAL BRANDS 1.908.288.7733, ALEX@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM DANIEL CARTIER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION CO-ORDINATOR 1.512.686.3466, DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM SAMANTHA ADKINS PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR, ADVERTISER RELATIONS 1.512.893.6908, SAMANTHA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ADVERTISING AJ ARAPOVIC

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.541.8128

BRIAN CORDOVA ADVERTISING SALES, CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGER BCORDOVA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.949.633.3093 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS BJ ANDREWS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR ANDREA BRADFORD ARLENE CZECH KARL DONVIL

CHRISTINE ERICKSON CELESTE GONZALEZ STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS MICHELLE SCOTT

G C H P 2 C I N N B E D R O C K B OM

# 3 ALL BREEDS * AMONG # 1 WORKING * # 1 BREED *

WALTER SOMMERFELT SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIĆ MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA & CREATIVE CONTENT ELMA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.686.3466 INSTAGRAM | @SHOWSIGHTMAG FACEBOOK | WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SHOWSIGHT/ TWITTER | @THESHOWSIGHT

OWNED BY KEITH & CHERYL ROBBINS DAVE BERREY DEBORAH CAYWOOD BONNIE WAGAMAN

BRED BY BONNIE WAGAMAN CINNIBON BOXERS NICOLE MANNA HANDLED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

GENERAL INQUIRIES: INFO@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM SUBSCRIPTIONS: SUBSCRIPTIONS@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM THE FROST TOWER 401 CONGRESS AVE SUITE 1540 AUSTIN, TX 78701 | 1.512.686.3466 WWW.SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM PROUDLY DESIGNED & PRINTED IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA USA

HISTORY IN THE THANK YOU JU WE ARE HONORED AN

*AKC STATS AS OF 7/31/2 BOXER

Wagaman FC.indd 1

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MINATURE AMERICAN SHEPHERD

B

# 3 # 1 # 1

CONTENTS

OWNED KEITH & DAVE B DEBOR BONNIE BRED B BONNIE CINNIB NICOLE HANDLE MICHAE ASSISTE DOTTIE

40 Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC 42 A Response from the American Kennel Club AKC 44 AKC News: Presidential Dogs AKC 48 AKC News: PAC Masks Are Here! AKC 62 Living Through the Covid-19 Pandemic DEBRA FERGUSON-JONES

Wagaman FC.indd 1

147 Terrier Group VARIOUS GUESTS

74

Do Your Research Before You Vote WALTER SOMMERFELT

202 Bichon

78 Missing Montgomery DAN SAYERS

VARIOUS GUESTS

208 Cavalier King Charles Spaniel VARIOUS GUESTS

86 Lines From Linda

LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

215 Cirneco dell’Etna VARIOUS GUESTS

98 Breeding with Intention CELESTE M. GONZALEZ

217 Doberman

110 Breeder Interview: Douglas Huffman ALLAN REZNIK

VARIOUS GUESTS

224 Golden Retriever VARIOUS GUESTS

120 Form Follows Function

STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH

234 German Shepherd Dog VARIOUS GUESTS

125 AKC News: Virtual Top Dog Challenge AKC

238 Coming Attractions

142 Cheyanne Kennel Club Candids PHOTOS BY CHERYL MECHALKE

240 Index to Advertisers

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POODLE (STANDARD)

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

THE SECRETS OF THE UNIVERSE

Dear Friends, Parts of this message will sound familiar to you, and that’s because I wrote something very similar last year in our May 2019 edition. Thanks to Superintendents, Show Clubs, AKC, exhibitors & judges, the 2020 show year is now in full-swing. This is the time when puppies often make their first appearance in the ring, new specials are brought out and this year’s stars are looking to build on their previous accomplishments, finish the year on top, and be considered as a top contender to win the AKC National Championship and Westminster. Everyone has “big dreams” for the future at this time of year. Of course, we all want to win. But in order to achieve this goal, it is important to have each of the following in place: 1. A Great Quality Dog 2. A Handler the Dog loves to be with and show for. (This can be an Owner-Handler, Breeder/Owner- Handler or a Hired Professional Handler.) 3. An Advertising Strategy 4. Someone who’s willing to pay for Items 1, 2 and 3. In some cases, one person is in charge of each of these things. At other times, multiple people play a role in a dog’s show career. Nevertheless, these four items are essential for success in the sport. ShowSight is here to help you with Numbers 3, 6 and 9. (I know, I told you about Number 3, but Numbers 6 and 9 are yours to discover. If you already knew the magnificence of 3, 6 and 9, then you would have the key to unlock the secrets of the universe!) Numbers 6 and 9 are the things we all have yet to discover—things we may never discover. However, it is the search for their discovery that is the fun part of showing dogs and what’s good for our sport. The search for these secrets keeps us coming back to shows weekend after weekend, month after month, year after year. This year has not been easy for any of us due to COVID-19 and, by now, I’m sure you’ve noticed that we have published and delivered copies of ShowSight to our clients, subscribers, and judges every single month. The time that we have usually invested being at shows we’ve invested wisely into helping clubs get their show back or figure out how to get it done, and we’ve helped many in need. (We’ve also been making improvements on ourselves here at ShowSight before the shows got back into full swing.) You will notice quite a bit of positive changes here at ShowSight Monthly over the next few months. Recently, we started using more luxurious paper and have added more meaningful editorial, including publishing 40 to 60 interviews with the sport’s most active breeders, handlers and judges—which has never been done by us or any other dog show publication. In addition, we are very close to launching our new website that will be a content driven website. More website details coming soon... To our talented staff, we’ve added experienced individuals who possess specific skillsets that provide our clients with the best value for every dollar spent. (And let’s not forget about giving thousands of our readers a publication they enjoy reading each and every month!) Our print publication is mailed to all AKC judges, many CKC judges, and quite a few International judges. ShowSight is also delivered to many parent clubs and show sites nationwide, week in and week out. And while I am talking about magazine distribution, I would like to thank all of our amazing distributors who make sure that our magazine is seen at shows every single week throughout the country and at the largest shows in Canada. We’re nowhere near finished with our developments! While we will be making a few more changes to our print magazine, we’ll be making some BIG digital changes as well. These will be announced very soon, so please stay tuned. We are continuing to grow our family because this is the only way that we will be able to give you much more of what you want. And isn’t that what it’s all about? Providing you with what you’ve been asking for? We want to be able to provide you with everything that you need to achieve your goals in the sport. Your dog is a “Perfect 10” and we want to help you spread this message throughout the universe.

Thank you for reading and make it a wonderful day!

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

T H E D O G S H O W M A G A Z I N E

Est 1992

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YORKSHIRE TERRIER

a response from THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB

W hen lawmakers or the pub- lic misunderstand AKC’s approach to responsible dog ownership, or get our positions wrong, we do our best to correct them. After all, it could impact our rights and our ability to own dogs. We use the incident as an opportunity to educate and invite people to learn more about us, who we are and what we do. Using the same principle, we’d like to comment on an article in the August issue of Showsight . Is AKC Missing a Tremendous Opportunity brought up some great points about the immense value of engagement with local and state lawmakers. We appreciate the author’s noting that the AKC website “has a listing” for government relations. It also indicated that the author and many fanciers may not be famil- iar with the scope of resources the AKC Government Relations (GR) Department offers, or the work already being done related to COVID-19. We’d like to share some of that information with you. The AKC GR Department includes nine professional staff with extensive experience in law, communications, public policy and the intersection of all three. Our mission includes ensuring that laws impacting dog owners are fair, reasonable and non- discriminatory. To accomplish this, we provide a wide variety of resources including: resources for clubs and individuals, direct outreach to lawmakers that is secondary to constituent outreach, and providing training and resources to help dog owners become successful advocates and be valued as part of the community in which they live. Not including counties or other jurisdictional entities, there are more than 19,000 incorporated cities and towns in the Unit- ed States. Most policymakers are rightly more interested in what their voting constituents have to say than in input from an out- side organization. This is why it is crucial that clubs and individ- uals get directly involved in the issues that impact them. Most public officials want to hear from you, their constituents. They rely on public input to understand the impact of their decisions. AKC GR’s job is to help dog owners succeed with this. With tens of thousands of jurisdictions and AKC events in a typical year, it’s hard for us to know if assistance is needed in a specific place, unless someone reaches out to let us know about it. Once you reach out to us, we’re proud of the assistance we provide so that dog enthusiasts can lead and succeed in their own communities.

AKC GR staff are always ready to answer questions and assist you with specific legislative issues. The AKC Legislative Action Center, located at www.akcgr.org , is your first stop for resources. It provides extensive information on the more than 2,300 dog-related bills we track annually; assistance with advocacy; resources for advo- cacy training; comprehensive issue information by topic; position statements and talking points; blogs; legislative alerts; newsletters; seminars; annual updates on the economic impact of AKC shows; resources you can present to lawmakers; educational programs for clubs; model legislation; election-related resources, including candi- date surveys and the AKC Political Action committee; and more. Throughout the pandemic, the AKC Government Relations team has also been active in COVID-19 policy issues impacting AKC and dog owners. This has evolved from advocacy to ensure that dog own- ers continue to be able to access pet supplies and essential services, and providing information on how AKC can stay open during the pandemic; to liability information related to the holding of events, and advocacy for targeted liability limits related to virus transmission for events in compliance with recognized health and safety guide- lines. The AKC Legislative Action Center’s COVID-19 resources page ( www.akcgr.org/covid19 ) is updated daily with the latest infor- mation on state regulations impacting dog owners, events and busi- nesses. The resources page also includes timely blogs on the latest information and tips on what club members and dog owners can do from home to continue being effective advocates. AKC GR is also advocating for federal and state laws to limit liability for clubs and events related to COVID-19 transmission when events are held in compliance with CDC and other jurisdic- tional health and safety recommendations. Information about these efforts, the status of various proposals and how clubs/individuals can get involved is available on the COVID-19 Liability key issue page at www.akcgr.org/covidliability . The author asked, “Is AKC missing a tremendous opportu- nity?” We’ll leave that answer up to you, but we hope this discus- sion will inspire you to familiarize yourself with the AKC Legisla- tive Action Center and the resources we offer. As always, they’re designed to help you with a range of issues, and they even include how to work with public officials when planning an event during the COVID-19 pandemic. Above all, please stay safe and don’t hesitate to reach out doglaw@ akc.org if you have questions.

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T AYL O R AM GCHS/CAN GCH SEABURY’S MADE TO MEASURE, AOM Presented by Joanne Thibault

*

*AKC STATS AS OF 7/31/20

CH Keevabay’s Fifty Shades x GCHB Seabury’s Sophie Tucker, AOM

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

NEWS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT: SAMANTHA SEYMOUR Phone: (212) 696-8343 Email: Samantha.Seymour@akc.org

THE AKC MUSEUM OF THE DOG RE-OPENS ITS DOORS WITH “PRESIDENTIAL DOGS” EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT RUNS FROM SEPTEMBER 8, 2020 – JANUARY 31, 2021

New York, NY – The AKC Museum of the Dog is excited to re-open its doors and also to announce its next exhibit. The “Presidential Dogs” exhibition will be on display beginning September 8th and will run through January 2021. A sneak- peek into this exhibit will be available upon the Museum’s re-opening on August 25th. The exhibition will look back on the different breeds of dogs that have lived at the White House. It will explore their history, highlight specific dogs that were owned by US presi- dents, and examine the influence these breeds had on the dog world as well as the American public at large.

From George Washington’s Foxhounds to Bo and Sunny, the Portuguese Water Dogs owned by the Obamas, this exhibit will examine the role of dogs in American presidential history. The exhibition will contain artwork from the MoD collection, historic documents from the AKC archives, and photo reproductions. Some breeds highlighted in the upcoming exhibit will include Airedale Terriers, Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, Collies, English Springer Spaniels, Foxhounds, Golden Retrievers, Newfoundlands, Portuguese Water Dogs, Scottish Terriers and Welsh Terriers. Using the AKC Museum of the Dog app (available on Google Play Store and the App store), visitors will be able to vote for their favorite presidential dog featured in the new exhibit. “The majority of our presidents have shared the White House with a dog and these presidential pooches have become an integral piece of our history,” said Executive Director Alan Fausel. “The new ‘Presidential Dogs’ exhibit looks back at some of the most famous four-legged friends in American History and we are thrilled to welcome visi-

tors back to the AKC Museum of the Dog with such an important historical exhibition.” For more information on the exhibit or the Museum, please visit www.museumofthedog.org. New safety policies and procedures for the Museum of the Dog can be found in this video.

For merchandise, please visit: www.museumofthedogstore.org. ABOUT THE AKC MUSEUM OF THE DOG

Founded in 1982, The AKC Museum of the Dog preserves, interprets and celebrates the role of dogs in society and educates the public about the human-canine bond through its collection of art and exhibits that inspire engagement with dogs. The museum is home to over 700 original paintings, drawings, watercolors, prints, sculptures, bronzes, and porcelain figurines, a variety of decorative arts objects and interactive displays depicting man’s best friend throughout the ages. The AKC Museum of the Dog is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization funded mainly by private and corporate gift donations.

For more information on the AKC Museum of the Dog visit www.Museumofthedog.org. Become a fan of the AKC Museum of the Dog on Facebook at akcmuseumofthedog.

DESIGN BY SHOWSIGHT

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SPANIEL (COCKER) PARTI

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CHINESE CRESTED

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MASKS ARE HERE!

Follow Poppy the Bichon Frise’s example to lead a safe lifestyle! Show your friends and family that you care about their health and well- being, while also protecting purebred dogs and dog sports. AKC Political Action Committee (AKC PAC) face masks help pro- tect you and your rights as a dog owner. Masks are available for a $12 donation to the AKC PAC. 100% of your contribution to the AKC PAC goes directly to elect- ing dog-friendly legislative candidates. PLUS! Send us a picture of yourself wearing the mask with your dog. We’ll feature it on social media and other media platforms. Minimum donation: $12.00 To make your donation, go to https://www.apps.akc.org/apps/pac/ index.cfm. Scroll to the bottom of the page. Select your club affiliation and check the box to proceed. Enter in your contact and other informa- tion. In the AKC-affiliated club box, please type “face mask donation.” SUPPORT THE AKC PAC The American Kennel Club has taken the lead in supporting leg- islation across the country that protects the rights of responsible dog owners. The AKC Political Action Committee gives us an additional tool with which to interface with legislators. Through this non-partisan PAC, we can demonstrate a unity of purpose that helps us advance a positive legislative agenda. The AKC PAC collects voluntary contributions from individuals and uses these donations to support candidates who defend dog own- ers’ rights and can effectively influence legislation impacting animal owners. Your donation will be pooled with contributions from AKC club members across the country to strengthen our support for reason- able, enforceable laws that protect the health and welfare of purebred dogs and do not restrict the rights of breeders and owners who take their responsibilities seriously.

Contributions to this fund are not deductible on federal tax returns. Federal law requires us to use our best efforts to collect and report the name, mailing address, occupation and name of employer of individuals whose contributions exceed $200 in a calendar year.* The maximum annual contribution to the AKC PAC is $5,000. All contributions are voluntary.

Disclaimer: Dogs do not need to wear masks, but they sure do make cute models!

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FRENCH BULLDOG

*

*

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WEIMARANER

*

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*

*AKC s tat s a s o f 7 / 3 1 / 2 0

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*

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DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

*AKC al l breed s tat s as of 7/31/20

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C H A M P I O N G R A N D C R U L E P I N I I

PINNY

Group Second . Alexandria KC, January 2020 . Judge Mr. Dana Cline

BRED BY: Melanie Steele & Rindi Gaudet OWNED BY: Deborah Bahm & Ashlie Whitmore HANDLED BY: Ashlie Whitmore & Alfonso Escobedo

GROUP FOURTH Galveston KC, February 2020 Judge Mrs. Claire “Kitty” Steidel

GROUP FOURTH Lost Dutchman KC, February 2020 Judge Ms. Robin Riel

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GREYHOUND, WHIPPET

S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N B O - B E T T A I R F O R C E O N E FORCE

Group First . Lost Dutchman KC, February 2020 . Judge Mrs. Jacqueline Stacy

OWNED BY: Deborah Bahm EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY: Ashlie Whitmore & Alfonso Escobedo BRED & CO-OWNED BY: Carol Harris

GROUP FIRST Big Spring KC, February 2020 Judge Ms. Lori Nelson

GROUP FIRST Corpus Christi KC, January 2020 Judge Dr. Steve Keating

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED, ALL BREED & GROUP STATS AS OF 6/30/20 BRUSSELS GRIFFON

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*

*

*AKC STATS 2019

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SCOTTISH TERRIER

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# 1

MALAMUTE ALL SYSTEMS*

MULTIPLE SPECIALTY WINNING | MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING GCHG ONAK’S TOUCH OF GOLD TT, WPDA, WPDX

HANDLED BY ER I N MEYERS

OWNED BY JENN I FER & WENDY CORR RUSSELL CAPR I O BRED BY JENN I FER & WENDY CORR T I NA DUNN

*AKC ALL SYSTEMS STATS AS OF 7/31/20

APPREC I AT I ON TO JUDGE MR . BOB BUSBY

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ALASKAN MALAMUTE

living through the

F riday the 13th of March has a reputation for being an unlucky day, and Fri- day, March 13, 2020 fulfilled expectations for the superstitious as dog shows across the country started shutting down because of the Coronavirus. Living through the COVID-19 pandemic has been a huge test for our country—and the dog show community is no exception. Some parts of our country are completely shut down for dog shows, whereas others are having shows. I have reached out to several professional handlers for insights into how different people across the country are handling the current Coronavirus situ- ation. Despite the diversity within the dog show community, we are all struggling to get back to the sport we love and miss so much. COVID-19 Pandemic BY DEBRA FERGUSON-JONES PROFESSIONAL HANDLERS SHARE THEIR STORIES

DIEGO GARCIA I contacted Diego Garcia at his home in Lillington, North Carolina, and asked him what he was doing that fateful Fri- day the 13th when they started shutting down dog shows. He was in Louisville, Kentucky, and had shown on Thursday and Friday. The clubs announced Friday after Best in Show that they were cancel- ing the balance of the shows that week- end because of the Coronavirus. Diego was home by Saturday.

Photo Courtesy of Diego Garcia

Diego is concerned about the Coronavirus. He commented that he and Evelyn are taking all the precautions. One foot out of the motorhome, they put on their masks and they wash their hands when they return. Outside the motor home they keep Clorox to wipe their shoes and try to social distance. When he arrives home, Diego Clorox’s the crates and everything used at the dog show. He keeps hand sanitizer in the set-up, motorhome and car. He says about the Coronavirus, “If it was going to happen, it was going to happen. It is out there.” Diego feels that the clubs have gone to great effort to keep the exhibitors safe. (Some judges are not so young.) He points out that everyone needs to understand and respect those who want to go back to dog shows and those who don’t want to go back. Diego emphasizes that we must each take care of

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*

*

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 7/31/20

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RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE BAY)

LIVING THROUGH THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

ourselves, wear a mask and wash our hands. “It is an effort running around the ring with a mask, sweating and keeping an eye on the dog,” he notes. Diego feels it is important to keep the stress down and stay calm, so that he can deal with the situation in the very best way. As he emphasizes, “So much negativity going around, it stresses the body making it so important to keep a good attitude.” Diego’s income was somewhat unscathed by the Coro- navirus. None of the dogs left his care when the dog shows stopped. Diego says, “My clients are like my family and they take care of us in so many ways. Dog show people are one big family. They all take care of each other. We will be there to help those who need help because I know they will be there when I need help. Dog shows are our life.” Diego is called “Mr. Obsession.” He is obsessive about his dogs and follows the same routine every day to keep the dogs in top condition. He works with the dogs on the golf cart to keep muscles tight. He explained to me that if you left a Boxer go without working for three to four days, you can see the difference in the muscle tone. As if the dogs are at the shows, Diego works them 20 minutes at a time—like a little show ring—doing a down and back and then going around. After that, there’s the grooming. “If you let a dog’s coat go for four to five days, you will lose it,” he reports. To end the day, like a ceremony, Diego has a glass of Argentine wine. Diego is a happy man who loves the life he is liv- ing. He loves the sport so much that he refers to it as “the opportunity to show.” Diego feels the best thing he can do is enjoy the pleasure he feels when he shows. His true goal is to show well. “When the dog deserves the win, take the win,” he advises. I asked Diego if he thought Westminster Kennel Club would have a show in 2021. He said he has no idea. He assumes the committee is doing the best they can to make the Garden happen. He said he would keep his fingers crossed and would accept any decision they make. Diego’s parting comment was to tell you, “Be safe.”

Dog show people are one big family. They all take care of each other.

Sunday at the Anderson show. She recalls the general belief was that it wouldn’t last more than a few weeks. It’s now been months since that fateful day and it seems like there is no end in sight. Taffe feels there isn’t likely to be too many dog shows on the West Coast in 2020, and she is skeptical about 2021. Taffe was quick to share stories of how the virus is spread- ing in many states and she believes the future of dog shows depends on how fast a vaccine is developed. Taffe expressed concern that dog shows will be a different sport when they start up again. “There will not be several dog shows every weekend like they were before,” she suggests. “Clubs may be having a hard time surviving.” Taffe expressed the opinion that before this pandemic, there were too many dog shows. She is fearful that clubs could fold, but maybe a couple can combine and survive. Taffe expressed the concern that win- ter shows would be indoors, though she was not sure how that would work. She also feels that a handful of handlers have moved on to other things. Being in a high-risk group with pre-existing health issues, Taffe isn’t planning on going to a dog show until it is safe. The Coronavirus has divided her family. To survive, the family has gone to extraordinary measures. Taffe and Connor are staying home to take care of the home front and the baby, while Bill and Olivia go off to the shows and quarantine separately from the family. The family will be split as long as they are having dog shows and there is a Coronavirus with no vaccine. She feels it is a hard life. With no dog shows on the West Coast, Bill and Olivia have to go East, nothing short of a twenty-hour drive to find a dog show. When Bill returns from a dog show he is quarantin- ing in a small portion of the house where he has a room and a bath with a separate entrance. Taffe puts his meal by the door and he picks it up after she leaves. She told me that Olivia is staying in the motor home so as not to expose the baby and Connor to the virus. Last weekend, Olivia drove off in tears when she headed out to the dog show, leaving her baby behind. I asked Taffe if Olivia was earning enough to be away from the baby. Taffe doubted it, but they have no choice. The resilience and support of the dog show community is apparent in Taffe’s story. The McFadden’s nest egg had been depleted due to Taffe’s struggle with cancer and lupus. “Take The Lead” has been a tremendous support since the family has been financially impacted during this pandem- ic. Many of their clients’ dogs went home when the shows

BILL & TAFFE MCFADDEN

Photo Vicki Holloway

Photo Derek Glas

Taffe and Bill McFadden were on opposite sides of the United States on that fateful Friday the 13th when dog shows started shutting down. Taffe was at the Anderson, California, dog show and her husband, Bill, was at the Lou- isville, Kentucky, shows. The Louisville shows shut down on Friday, so Bill made the long trek back to California. Taffe was very concerned as she continued to work through

64 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER 2020

B I S M R B I S G C H N I KAL UK N KOBA’ S SHAL L WE DANCE ?

THANK YOU JUDGE S DEN I S E DEAN & C I NDY C . L ANE

EXCL US I VE LY HANDL ED BY E LV I N I ZAGU I RR E

BR ED BY KAR L A & S T E PHEN WAL L

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER 2020 | 65

SIBERIAN HUSKY

LIVING THROUGH THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

BRUCE & TARA SCHULTZ

Handlers Bruce and Tara Schultz are weathering the Coronavirus crisis in the hills of Encini- tas, California. They are the owners of Alcala County Pet Resort and Camp- Schultz. Like most people, the impact of the Coronavi-

Everyone is doing what they need to do to maintain social distancing at dog shows... the concern is that after the show, people gather to go to dinner, enjoying each the other’s company doing all the normal things

Photo Vicki Holloway

rus pandemic has had a major impact on their business. To illustrate, the Schultz’s had 100 dogs booked in each of their two kennels when the United States discovered it was in the middle of a pandemic. Only four dogs showed up, because people simply stopped traveling. Luckily for the couple, there was still a demand for grooming which helped to partially offset the decline in boarding and the absence of dog shows. Most of the specials Bruce was showing before the pandemic went home just a couple weeks after all the shows had been cancelled. He is also supplementing his income raising Bloodhounds and Golden Retriever pup- pies. Thus far, the puppies have not seen the show ring, but he works with them daily going to parks, road working and socializing them. Bruce had to lay off ten employees. He was surprised when some of the employees did not want to come back to work because they were receiving more through unemployment than they would make going back to work. When I asked Bruce when he thought he would be ready for another dog show, he proudly told me that he and Tara had gone to Alaska in July. Bruce’s brother lives in Alaska, so he made it a dog show trip and a family visit. Before trav- eling to Alaska, the couple had to have a Coronavirus test and prove they had tested negative 72 hours before arriv- ing at the Anchorage Airport. As a sign of the times, when boarding the airplane they took extra precautions; wearing long sleeves, latex gloves, a mask, and disinfecting every- thing before sitting in their seats. Not only did the State of Alaska require a Coronavirus test, but so did Bruce’s brother. Arriving in Anchorage, there were two lines at the airport—the Coronavirus-tested line and the quarantine line. Bruce had no idea what happened to the people in the quarantine line, but he was glad he was not in it. Bruce praised the Alaskan Dog Show Committee’s com- mitment to social distancing. It was certainly a different experience. There were no spectators and all attendees wore masks. When not in the ring, participants returned to their set-ups. Bruce had no problem wearing a mask in the ring because he had experimented with several before picking the right one for him. To his knowledge, not one person complained about the show or wearing a mask. So, what does Bruce have to show for his harrowing flight to Alaska? Two Reserve Bests in Show, plus five Group placements. Bruce felt the Best in Show lineup con- sisted of high-quality dogs from across the country.

with the mask off and no social distancing.

were canceled. Taffe fears some clients may be choosing not to continue to show dogs. To supplement their income, the McFadden’s started grooming on the side. “A lot of people see their dogs as their kids and are willing to spend money on their dogs,” Taffe says. With so many of the grooming shops closed because of Coronavirus, they have had a great opportunity to build up quite a pet clientele. Plus, a couple of litters of puppies have helped. And in those litters they have found hopefuls but, with no dog shows on the hori- zon, they may not be puppies when they see their first dog show. The family is also selling wellness products which have helped supplement their income. In addition, the fam- ily was able to take advantage of government loans. Taffe shared how amazed she is at what a great job the dog show community has been doing to put on dog shows safely. “Everyone is doing what they need to do to maintain social distancing at dog shows,” she says. “The concern is that after the show, people gather to go to dinner, enjoying each the other’s company doing all the normal things with the mask off and no social distancing.” On the lighter side, Taffe shared that this has been the best summer in decades. “Being forced to stay home with the new baby has been the best gift ever,” she shares. Taffe never had such a chance to spend such quality time with her own kids as she was always “running the hamster wheel.” Taffe’s goal when she returns to dog shows is to put nine Bests in Show on Bono, her Havanese, giving him a total of 100 Bests in Show.

66 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER 2020

MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING GCHB KMA LEMAIRE’S GLADIATOR GCH CH MJM N MA I T AU BE T T ER BE L I EVE I T CGC x KMA BEDROCK WI L L NVR B DA SAME

A TEAM TO WATCH

OUR GRATITUDE AND APPRECIATION TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO RECOGNIZED LOUIE’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY.

MS. CAROLYN I. ALEXANDER MRS. JOAN P. ANSELM MRS. LINDA BERBERICH MRS. EVA E. BERG DR. ALBERT P. BIANCHI MR. RICK BLANCHARD MS. SHERRY BOSLEY MRS. TERRIE BREEN MRS. DONNA BUXTON MR. KENNETH BUXTON MRS. SUSAN M. CARR MR. DANA CLINE DR. THOMAS M. DAVIES MRS. TERRY DENNISON

MR. ROBERT ENNIS MRS. SIOUX FORSYTH-GREEN MR. JAMES FREDERICKSON MR. DENNIS J. GALLANT MRS. GLORIA GERINGER MR. LLOYD GRASER JR MR. RICK GSCHWENDER MS. JUDY HARRINGTON MS. PATRICIA HASTINGS MS. THERESA L. HUNDT MRS. PAT M. JENKINS MR. JEFFREY LANGEVIN MRS. JOAN LIEBES LUNA MR. CARL GENE LIEPMANN MS. LAURIE MAULUCCI MS. CHARLOTTE MCGOWEN MS. CINDY MEYER MS. SHEILA D. PASKE MR. DAVID J. PEAT MR. RONALD POCK DR. JOHN A. REEVE-NEWSON

& PAUL

OWNED BY JAYME LEMAIRE BRED BY CYNDI HARDY EXPERTLY PRESENTED BY PAUL LEVESQUE

MR. JAY RICHARDSON MR. ANDREW RITTER MR. WILLIAM SAHLOFF

MRS. ROSEMARY SHOREMAN MRS. NANCY D. SIMMONS MR. WARREN SIMON MRS. LYNN E. SMITH MR. WALTER J. SOMMERFELT MR. ROBIN STAMSELL MRS. CINDY STANSELL MR. ROBERT STEIN MRS. DEBRA THORNTON MR. ROBERT L. VANDIVER DR. MICHAEL J. WOODS MRS. RUTH ZIMMERMAN

© JOHN ASHBEY

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GREAT DANE

LIVING THROUGH THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Bruce commented that there would be no dog shows in California this year and that Palm Springs had just canceled their show for January 2021. When I asked Bruce what he thought Westminster was going to be like next year, he commented that he didn’t know if there would be a Westminster in 2021. He believes that if someone is going to a dog show in this environment they are going because they truly love the sport of dogs and simply want to be at a dog show. Bruce treasures spending evenings at home with his family. He feels that despite the sadness of the situation it’s been a nice break from dog shows. Bruce feels that if every- body abides by the rules, we can all get through this.

Life has slowed down for Ernesto. He has stopped trav- eling and is reconnecting to the country life. This spring, he saw trees and flowers on his property he had never seen before because he was always gone at shows. He has truly enjoyed this summer as an opportunity to stop and smell the roses. Ernesto is trying to stay as safe as possible. He lives with people who are in a high-risk category for age or physical conditions. He feels that in the current environ- ment you could potentially risk your life. Ernesto clearly remembers the first lockdown in New York City. In those early days, there was such confusion and simply not enough information to make educated decisions and understand the risk factors. Ernesto shares that he attended the dog shows in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, which had over 2,000 entries. When Ernesto entered the shows, his intent was that if he got to the show and did not feel safe, he would simply leave. One advantage Ernesto had was that he lived about an hour away, which allowed him to avoid sleeping in a hotel. Once he arrived, he felt comfortable and it ended up being a good experience for everyone. He felt that the measures taken by the clubs were good. Once your temperature was checked, you received a bracelet identifying it was okay for you to go into a building. You were advised to show your dog and go back to your set-up. The public was not allowed at the show. The show went well and the majority of people obeyed the rules. Ernesto admitted that it was a challenge to change the habits of a lifetime to conform to the new behavior of social distancing. At one point, he went toward the show building, then remembered he forgot his mask and had to run back to get it. Ernesto did say that he did not like run- ning around the ring in a mask. He laughingly commented that it was very difficult to hold bait with a mask on. The rings were marked, so that made it easier to socially dis- tance while in the ring. The judge would go over your dog, run you around the ring, put you in order of wins and, as you exited the ring, you picked up your ribbons. All in all, minimal contact and everyone did a great job of social dis- tancing. It appeared that the rules were effective and every- one worked within the rules. Everyone had a mask, but for those people showing multiple dogs, their masks were get- ting wet. Ernesto was not sure a wet mask was doing its job. No one, to his knowledge, has reported getting sick. He acknowledged that it is a problem congregating people from all different areas, and is confident that, in time, we will find out if people are getting sick at the shows. The gossip mill will let us know if someone falls ill. Ernesto does believe dog shows will come back. For lots of people, dog shows are their lives. As a group, we must be successful at putting on dog shows. We are not essential. If we don’t help ourselves, no one—except for the dog show people—will care if dog shows are canceled. Winter will be trying. Handlers are concerned about attending the big indoor shows that come in winter and they also worry if the hotels will be safe. Ernesto decided not to go to the Canfield, Ohio, shows. He wanted to exercise caution and see how the shows worked in Canfield, as they would be two times the size of the shows he had attended in Bloomsburg. Ernesto rea- soned that it would more than likely be hot and humid, and he imagined that everyone would be congregating under

ERNESTO LARA

In late July, I was lucky enough to talk with Ernesto Lara from his home in the Pennsylva- nia countryside. I asked Ernesto what he was doing that fateful weekend in March when they closed down all the dog shows? He was

Photo Jeffrey Hanlin

in Pennsylvania at a two-day dog show, which was half an hour away from his home. Ernesto was worried about being exposed to the Coronavirus at the show, but felt that if he had been exposed, he already had it. With an entry of 3,000 dogs and probably twice that many people, the opportunity to be exposed was there. Fortunately, he did not get it.

All in all, minimal contact and everyone did a great job of social distancing. It appeared that the rules were effective and everyone worked within the rules. “ ”

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KERRY BLUE TERRIER

G R A N D C H A M P I O N SHATARA’S TAILS OF THEMOON ALSO RISING

W E S T M I N S T E R T H A N K Y O U J O H N C O N S T A N T I N E - A M O D E I

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HAVANESE

G R A N D C H A M P I O N SHATARA’S TAILS OF THEMOON ALSO RISING

THANK YOU JUDGE CHARLES OLVIS Breeder/Owner/Handler: Michelle Soave Owners: Lindley Hord, Colleen Freedman &Michelle Soave, 540-817-0980 SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER 2020 | 71

LIVING THROUGH THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

and he thinks that they should go. Scott does not plan to go back to dog shows until there is a vaccine. Scott feels that if he goes back to professional handling, it will be on a much smaller level in the range of five to six dogs, not 20 to 30. His clients would love for him to go back. Scott, for right now, is simply concentrating on taking care of his kennel. Scott told me that as a result of the Coronavirus the country has been affected by an extreme reduction of trav- el, which has affected his boarding kennel, The Kennel at Champions. Fortunately, while the boarding side has been slow, people still want their dogs groomed. Consequently, the grooming side of the business has remained the same as pre-coronavirus days. The virus has certainly changed how he operates his daily business. As part of Scott’s Coronavi- rus preparation for the business, dog owners are no longer allowed in the kennel. A staffer goes to the car to get the dog and brings the dog inside. Any visitors to the kennel must wear masks. Scott did comment that this week his kennel has two boarders whose families are traveling to Florida to visit Disney World. I felt the need to ask Scott one more question and that was what he thought Westminster would be like in 2021? He feels that without an audience, it simply would not be the same. He questioned whether social distancing would be possible in the existing pier structures. He suggested they might eliminate benching the dogs this year. It will be interesting to see what happens. Resilience, responsibility, unity, and fearlessness are the essence of the dog show community, and these character- istics shine through in the stories of Diego, Bill & Taffe, Bruce & Tara, Ernesto, and Scott. Although 2020 has been a rough year, we can all reflect on the challenges we are currently facing—and the future of dog shows—with a focus on our strengths, resilience, responsibility, unity, and fearlessness.

tents, masks would be wet and, with 3,500 dogs and prob- ably more people, it may be harder to comply with the rules. Ernesto feels that we need to keep people in contact with dog shows. He believes that virtual dog shows are a tool to keep things going and allow exhibitors to participate. Ernesto was asked to judge two virtual shows. He thought it would be a good thing for the fancy and be fun for him to participate in as well. As a handler, Ernesto is surviving, but it is tough. He has had to tighten up his belt and prepare for the future. He runs a show kennel and, once Montgomery canceled, several dogs went home, which cost him that income stream. For- tunately, he was able to take advantage of the government loan programs that were available for the self-employed. He shared that he has concerns regarding his clients who are debating about what to do with their breeding programs. Many of their dogs are mature and ready to go and have had their careers cut short or postponed. It is time to go back to basics. Winning does not make a great dog. He has seen dogs go to a show and lose their class one day and go Best in Show the next. Dog shows are about breeding a better dog. Finally, I asked Ernesto about his thoughts on Westmin- ster and would it be the same in 2021? He commented that this is a big question. There already is a problem with the location, but the club works hard and they have resources, which he believes will allow them to develop a safety plan. They may change the date or make it outdoors. He didn’t know, but it was such a tradition, like the Kentucky Derby, and the show must go on!

SCOTT SOMMER

I visited with Scott Sommer from his home in Spring, Texas. He is con- cerned that dog shows have changed a lot and the corona- virus will change it even more, making it unrecognizable from the sport we have all known. He feels that with so few dog shows this year,

Photo John Ashbey

the few remaining shows are going to be huge. He men- tioned the 3,600 dogs entered in the Ohio shows. He does not understand why anyone would want to go to dog shows at this time. His concern is that people will be traveling from all over the country to these shows. Scott believes that a lot of judges have mixed feelings right now about step- ping back into the ring. Many AKC dog show judges are in the high-risk category due to age. Those kinds of numbers make it difficult for people to socially distance. States like Texas simply cannot hold outdoor dog shows in the sum- mer heat. Scott is not sure that he wants to go back into the ring as a dog handler. He cannot picture himself running around a ring wearing a mask. He knows that his friends want to go back to dog shows (and need to make a living)

Photo Vicki Holloway

Debra Ferguson-Jones is an AKC Delegate and AKC Judge of the Toy and Non-Sporting Groups, as well as many of the Terrier breeds. Her dogs have won over 150 All-Breed Bests in Show and the Poodle Club of America National Specialty, twice. Debra lives in the Greater Seattle area, home of Microsoft, Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks, Expedia and the Seahawks. Outside of the dog world, she is a developer of single-family neighborhoods.

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