Top Notch Toys - March 2020

BIS TH. PH. EW’19 CH. TOKIE TREND FACTOR Badboy

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m u l t i p l e b e s t i n s h o w w i n n i n g c h a m p i o n

TIMEBOMB PUFF owned by ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO | BRED & CO-OWNED by DARYL MARTIN

A breeder’s key to longevity is generation after generation of consistent quality

Westminster Kennel Club Best of Breed our Sincere appreication to Mr. John Constantine-Amodei

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“TIMEBOMB” EXPLODES AT THE GARDEN

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

ARAMEDIA

AJ ARAPOVIC President aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103

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MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

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TNT

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15 Rest in Peace, Joseph Neil McGinnis III

Living With The Pomeranian Victoria Oelerich

Photo of Joe in New Yor taken by AJ Ara CEO/Publisher, The AraMedia G

Judging the Min Pin Larry Dewey

BONNIE GUGGENHEIM Editor/Advertising Director 512-971-3280 bonnie@aramediagroup.com DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III Executive Editor Emeritus Chief Media Consultant editor@aramediagroup.com

REST IN PEACE, JOSEPH NEIL MCGINNIS III MARCH 25, 1953 - FEBRUARY 25, 2020 Living With Min Pins Gretchen Hofheins-Wackerfuss 62 TNT Top Twenty Toys

18 Toy Talk 22 Toy Box

Bonnie Guggenheim

E very ship must have a captain. We are so grateful you were ours. We are heartbroken to report the passing of our beloved Ex- ecutive Editor Emeritus, Joseph Neil McGinnis lll. For decades, Joe stood at the helm of Top Notch Toys —steering our ship and setting our course. Joe start- ing publishing dog show magazines with his partner, the late Duane Doll, after years of successfully breeding and showing their beloved Pekingese. Their goal was simple—to celebrate the beauty of purebred dogs, educate on the individual breeds, and shine a spotlight on the hard fought victories in the dog show fancy. As accomplished Pekingese breeders in their own right, giving the delightful breeds in the Toy Group a platform to shine, made Top Notch Toys an excep- tionally important endeavor for them. Top Notch Toys , along with the Pe- kingese Magazine The Orient Express , helped pave the way for many exciting Scent Work, The Next Frontier Sherye Wise 66 Remember Your Mentors Richard Miller 62 Some Thoughts From the USA Dale and Jane Martenson 63 Selecting A Japanese Chin Puppy Dale Martenson 64 65 False Pregnancy or P eudopregnancy in Dogs Ernest Ward, DVM

publications, including ShowSight , our award winning all-breed magazine. The AraMedia Publishing Group is a passionate company, but at our heart we are a family of people who hav worked together for years. We love one another a great deal, and we are all at a loss for words today, as we say goodbye to our mentor, captain, and dear friend. Never one to be idle, Joe had become an AKC Judge for his beloved Pe- kingese Breed, and was also an ac- complished writer, philanthropist, music producer, songwriter, singer, Tony Award Winning Broadway producer and devoted family mem- ber. With Duane he also was a Blue Ribbon winning breeder of milking shorthorn cattle. The body of work Joe leaves behind is nothing short of extraordinary. We feel that the best way to honor his stag- gering legacy is to keep moving for- ward his mission of championing the dog show world he loved. Index to Advertisers TNT All-Breed System TNT Breed System National Owner Handled System Top Toys Rates

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMe- dia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express writ- ten permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publica- tion either editorially or in advertis- ing copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com. Joe is survived by: his brother Ch McGinnis (Patty); sisters Eliza Strodman (Tom), Mary McGi and Barbara ‘Totsy’ Moake (R partner Zell von Pohl an. mu nieces, nephews, grand-nieces grand nephews. Joe was precede death by his parents, Joseph, Sr. Harriet Mae (Birmingham) Mc nis, and husband, Duane Doll. Our hearts go out to all of them a difficult time—and to Joe’s vas tended family of friends throug the dog show world, entertainmen dustry and b yond. We knowmany of you reading this want to help us pay tribute to Joe his astounding legacy. Next mo our April Issue will be a celebr of his life. We invite all of you to part. Please contact Editor & Ad tising Director Bonnie Guggen for details at (512) 971-3280. Sincerely, The AraMedia Publishing Group Family

24 Upcoming Features 48

28 Ocala Winter Cluster

photos by Tom Weigand 50 Virginia (Jenny) Hauber 52

32 Breeding the Chihuahua for the Show Ring

36 History of

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the Chihuahua Art Johnson

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*TNT breed stats as of 1/31/20

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PROFESSIONAL HANDLER ALL BREEDS

SPECIALIZING IN TOYS AND HERDING BREEDS

debwheelerdogshowhandler@gmail.com

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Photo of Joe in New York City taken by AJ Arapovic, CEO/Publisher, The AraMedia Group.

REST IN PEACE, JOSEPH NEIL MCGINNIS III MARCH 25, 1953 - FEBRUARY 25, 2020

E very ship must have a captain. We are so grateful you were ours. We are heartbroken to report the passing of our beloved Ex- ecutive Editor Emeritus, Joseph Neil McGinnis lll. For decades, Joe stood at the helm of Top Notch Toys —steering our ship and setting our course. Joe start- ing publishing dog show magazines with his partner, the late Duane Doll, after years of successfully breeding and showing their beloved Pekingese. Their goal was simple—to celebrate the beauty of purebred dogs, educate on the individual breeds, and shine a spotlight on the hard fought victories in the dog show fancy. As accomplished Pekingese breeders in their own right, giving the delightful breeds in the Toy Group a platform to shine, made Top Notch Toys an excep- tionally important endeavor for them. Top Notch Toys , along with the Pe- kingese Magazine The Orient Express , helped pave the way for many exciting

publications, including ShowSight , our award winning all-breed magazine. The AraMedia Publishing Group is a passionate company, but at our heart we are a family of people who have worked together for years. We love one another a great deal, and we are all at a loss for words today, as we say goodbye to our mentor, captain, and dear friend. Never one to be idle, Joe had become an AKC Judge for his beloved Pe- kingese Breed, and was also an ac- complished writer, philanthropist, music producer, songwriter, singer, Tony Award Winning Broadway producer and devoted family mem- ber. With Duane he also was a Blue Ribbon winning breeder of milking shorthorn cattle. The body of work Joe leaves behind is nothing short of extraordinary. We feel that the best way to honor his stag- gering legacy is to keep moving for- ward his mission of championing the dog show world he loved.

Joe is survived by: his brother Charles McGinnis (Patty); sisters Elizabeth Strodman (Tom), Mary McGinnis, and Barbara ‘Totsy’ Moake (Rick); partner Zell von Pohlman. multiple nieces, nephews, grand-nieces and grand nephews. Joe was preceded in death by his parents, Joseph, Sr., and Harriet Mae (Birmingham) McGin- nis, and husband, Duane Doll. Our hearts go out to all of them at this difficult time—and to Joe’s vast ex- tended family of friends throughout the dog show world, entertainment in- dustry and beyond. We knowmany of you reading this will want to help us pay tribute to Joe and his astounding legacy. Next month, our April Issue will be a celebration of his life. We invite all of you to take part. Please contact Editor & Adver- tising Director Bonnie Guggenheim for details at (512) 971-3280. Sincerely, The AraMedia Publishing Group Family

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Congratulates THE 2 0 1 9 AKC NA T I ONA L CHAMP I ONSH I P W I NNERS r 0 1 9 ongr t l tes THE 2 0 1 9 AKC NA T I ONA L CHAMP I ONSH I P W I NERS ratulates THE 2 0 1 9 AKC NA T I ONA L CHAMP I ONSH I P W I NNERS r 0 1 9 ratul tes THE 2 0 1 9 AKC NA T I ONA L CHAMP I ONSH I P W I NERS

S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “ANDY” Golden Retriever GCHG CH Paradigm’s Field Of Leongolden Handler: Laurie Jordan-Fenner O R T I O U : N Go d tri ver CH CH Pa di Han e La ie o n-Fen er S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “ANDY” Golden R triever GCHG CH Paradigm’s Field Of Le ngolden Handler: Laurie Jordan-Fenner S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “ANDY” olden Retriever GC G CH Paradigm’s Field Of Leongolden Handler: Laurie Jordan-Fenner S P O R T I R O U : N ol n Re r v r GCH CH Pa dig ’ Fie Of Le a i o Fen S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “ANDY” olden R triever GCHG CH Paradigm’s Field Of Le ngolden Handler: Laurie Jordan-F nner

W O R K I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “TY” Giant Schnauzer GCHG CH Ingebar’s Tynan Dances With Wildflowers Handler: Katie Shepard K O U : ” G a S zer C G CH I gebar’ y e h lo Han e K tie e ar W O R K I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “TY” Giant Schnauzer GCHG CH Ingebar’s Tynan Dances With Wildflowers Handler: Katie Shepard W O R K I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “TY” iant Schnauzer GC G CH Ing bar’s Tynan Dances With Wildflowers Handler: Katie Shepard i W O R K I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “TY” iant Schnauzer GCHG CH Ingebar’s Tynan Dances With Wildflowers Handler: Katie Shepard W O K G G O U i t S uzer GCH CH Ing b r’s Ty : ” e h lo

T E R R I E R G R O U P W I N N E R : “DAZZLE” Welsh Terrier GCHG CH Brightluck Money Talks Handler: Tracy Ann Szaras R I O U : L W l h Te ri r G CH Br g n Han e T a A Sz ras T E R R I E R G R O U P W I N N E R : “DAZZLE” Welsh T rier GCHG CH Brightluck Money Talks Handle : Tracy Ann Szaras T E R R I E R G R O U P W I N N E R : “DAZZLE” Welsh Terrier GC G CH Brightluck Money Talks Handler: Tracy Ann Szaras T R R I E O U : L W h rri r GCH CH Br t ck M ney a r T E R R I E R G R O U P W I N N E R : “DAZZLE” Welsh T rrier GCHG CH Brightluck Money Talks Handle : Tracy Ann Szaras

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H E R D I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SOPHIA” Old English Sheepdog GCHG CH Bagatelle Moonlight Drive Handler: Cliff Steele R D O U : O n h S e d GC CH Bagatel e oo Han e C i f S eel H E R D I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SOPHIA” Old English Sheepdog GCHG CH Bagatelle Moonlight Drive Handler: Cliff Steele H E R D I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SOPHIA” Old English Sheepdog GC G CH Bagatelle Moonlight Drive Handler: Cliff Steele H R D G R O U : Ol gl s Sh epdo GCH CH Baga l e oo f H E R D I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SOPHIA” Old English Sheepdog GCHG CH Bagatelle Moonlight Drive Handler: Cliff St ele

H O U N D G R O U P W I N N E R : “PENNY” Rhodesian Ridgeback GCHS CH Shadowridge A Touch Of Class Handler: Lauren Hay-Lavitt O U : E R i n i k GCH CH Sh w dg a Han e La en Ha -Lavi t H O U N D G R O U P W I N N E R : “PENNY” Rhodesian Ridgeback GCHS CH Shadowridge A Touch Of Class Handler: Lauren Hay-Lavitt H O U N D G R O U P W I N N E R : “PENNY” Rhodesian Ridgeback GC S CH Shadowridge A Touch Of Class Handler: Lauren Hay-Lavitt a en a vi t H O U N D G R O U P W I N N E R : “PENNY” Rhodesian Ridgeback GCHS CH Shadowridge A Touch Of Class Handler: Lauren Hay-Lavitt H D O U : E Rho si n Ridgeb ck GCH C Sh i ge c a

N O N - S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SIBA” Standard Poodle GCHP CH Stone Run Afternoon Tea Handler: Chrystal Clas O R T I O U : S a ar e GC P C St n e oo Han e C ry a la O N - S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SIBA” St n ard Poodle GCHP CH Stone Run After oon Tea Handler: Chrystal Clas N O N - S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SIBA” Standard Poodle GC P CH Stone Run Afternoon Tea Handler: Chrystal Clas N O - S O R T I O U : St da Po e GCH C Ston u er oo O N - S P O R T I N G G R O U P W I N N E R : “SIBA” Stan ard Poodle GCHP CH Stone Run After oon Tea Handler: Chrystal Clas

2019 NATIONAL CHAMPION “WASABI” 9 NATIONAL CHAMPION 2019 NATIONAL CHAMPION “WASABI” 2019 NATIONAL CHAMPION “WASABI” 9 NATIONAL CHAMPION 2019 NATIONAL CHAMPION “WASABI”

Many are worthy, Only one can be crowned e t o d any are worthy, Only one can be crowned Many are worthy, Only one can be crowned e t o d any are worthy, Only one can be crowned

T O Y G R O U P W I N N E R Pekingese GCH CH Pequest Wasabi Handler: David Fitzpatrick a dl r D vi Fitz tr ck GC CH Pequest Wasabi Handler: David Fitzpatrick H Pe uest Wa a i D Fi t ck N Pe ese Peq T O Y G R O U P W I N N E R Pekingese Y R U W I N ki e

Y T O Y G R O U P W I N N E R Pekingese G CH P quest Wasabi Handler: David Fitzpatrick T O Y G R O U P W I N N E R Pekingese G CH P quest Wasabi Handler: Dav d Fitzpatrick

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TOY TALK ETCETERA by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor

THE IMPORTANCE OF A STRONG BOARD OF DIRECTORS

M any of you have been to your Na- tional Specialty in the last few months in particular for April, May and June where we focus on our specific toy breeds and make plans during the year so we have just the right dog or bitch to exhibit. We evaluate potential show stock with our friends and watch the whelping box for special puppies that will rep- resent the next champions to carry on our kennel name. A lot of work, some- times heartache and lots of times the pure joy of raising the puppies and watching them play and hopefully develop into show dogs or wonderful family pets. We are all hoping to cre- ate upcoming winners! Parent clubs are important to the breeds and breeders they represent for many reasons, but most impor- tant, they are comprised of a board dedicated to protecting the breeds that we love. That means careful eval- uation of any possible changes to the standard and promoting local clubs that will educate and create possible future national board members and show chair.

The Board is also responsible for making appropriate changes to the constitution and by-laws and care- fully watching the budget and club money. Intelligent decisions must be made regarding show sites, insurance that bonds the treasurer and provides liability for the annual National Spe- cialty. Board members devote many hours of volunteer time and effort to make it all happen for members that spend money on vacations and money to attend. Lots of money! The majority of us spend a week of vaca- tion attending and make it fun as it is the most important show of the year. What a great way to see different parts of the country while enjoying the National and spending time with friends and meeting new people! We have a great opportunity to evaluate our breeding compared to others in the classes, learn from the seminars on judging and taking part in the health tests available at the National. Top Notch Toys contact parent clubs for information on judging the breed, living with the breed and his- tory of the breed for the months each

Bonnie bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512.971.3280 Hope you had a fabulous time and give lots of entries to the Bred By class. Remember, inquiring minds want to know! breed is featured. Please ask your board of directors to participate when contacted. We also have questions for breed- ers and judges that answer questions with fresh and new answers. I hope you enter the Bred By classes with the best of your breeding—it should be the heart and soul of your breeding program! The Bred By class has always been my personal favorite and should be yours too. The Specials class gives you a rare opportunity to see ranked dogs and bitches from the USA and foreign shores across the country. Perhaps you hope to purchase a new puppy or adult to further your breed- ing program (please say you have a planned program) or you need to see an actual stud dog whose pedigree looks perfect. The dog may or may not be what you envisioned.

As the dog show world mourns the passing of this magazine’s founder and Editor Emeritus, Joe McGinnis, I can’t help but marvel at the legacy he leaves behind. So many of us in the dog show world have treasured histories with him, myself included. A thousand words won’t bring him back,

neither will a thousand tears. Instead I will just say this for all of us who knew him, we’ll be mourning and celebrating Joe’s great life and joyous spirit for years to come. God speed my dear friend. You will be missed. -Bonnie

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2 0 1 9 N O H S A N D Y TCA # 1 OWN E R H A N D L E D YO R K S H I R E T E R R I E R AWA R D W I N N E R

MULTI OH GROUP WINNING MULTI GROUP PLACING/OH BIS/2019 # 1 NOHS GCHS TYAVA’S SUGARFOOTS STRIKE FORCE

Thank you to Judge Sandy Wheat for this lovely BOB/BOBOH, and to the Judges finding this correct Yorkie in the Groups.

*AKC NOHS stats 2019

BREEDER Ava Tyree | Tyava’s Yorkies

OWNER/HANDLER Vicki Edwards | Sugarfoot Yorkies

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog. 22 • T op N otch T oys , M arch 2020

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APRIL 2020 E D I T I ON FEATURING

SHIH TZU NATIONAL SPECIALTY - MAY 12-17 MYRTLE BEACH, SC CAVALIER KINGCHARLES SPANIEL NATIONAL SPECIALTY - APRIL 28-30 WILMINGTON, OH

DISTRIBUTED AT MAJOR SHOWS FROM MARCH - APRIL

The ExclusiveAll Toy National Magazine

DEADLINE MAR 20 TH 1 FULL PAGE $ 4 2 5 2 FULL PAGES $ 7 5 0

• AKC TOY JUDGES • INTERNATIONAL JUDGES • OUR GLOBAL SUBSCRIBERS • EMAILED TO OUR VAST AUDIENCE • SHARED ON SOCIAL MEDIA SENT TO

CONTACT

Bonnie Guggenheim TNT National Sales Call Text 512.971.3280 bonnie@aramediagroup.com

PRICES INCLUDE CUSTOMDESIGN AND UNLIMITED PHOTOS

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BISSOH GCHB CH BROOKVIEW'S FIRST YOELLE

CHIC #119301 OFA Eyes - NORMAL OFA Patellas - NORMAL FULL DENTITION

THANK YOU JUDGE MR. RAYMOND V. FILBURN JR.

BEST OF BREED ATLANTA, GA - 1/30 BEST OF BREED ATLANTA, GA - 1/31 BEST OF BREED ATLANTA, GA - 2/1 BEST OF BREED TUNICA, MS - 2/16

ALWAYS BREEDER-OWNER HANDLED BY: MATINA E. JOHNSON AKC BREEDER OF MERIT

YTCA Top Breeder 2017 BKC Breeder of the Year 2017 Brookview Yorkshire Terriers www.brookviewyorkies.com

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CHAMPION NEWMONT FANCI FINALE

SERENA FINISHED QUICKLY WITH 4 MAJORS AND SEVERAL WINS OVER SPECIALS. SHE’S ALMOST COMPLETED HER GRAND CHAMPIONSHIP.

BREEDERS: MICKEY KERN & BONNIE L HALE OWNERS: MICKEY KERN & MATTHEW HOAGLUND

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WOLPERT’S YORKSHIRE TERRIERS

Dealer WOLPERT’S I’M THE REAL DEAL C H WO L P E R T ’ S TOM F OO L E R Y X WO L P E R T ’ S E X T R A K I S S E S

Dealer was WD, BOW at the YTCA Specialty Feb. 9, 2020 under judge Ms. Terri Lyddon (pictured above) and RWD at the YTCGNY Specialty on Feb. 8, 2020. Last year Dealer was Grand Sweepstakes winner at the YTCGNY on Sat. Feb. 9, 2019 under breeder judge Mrs. Kathy Weems and YTCA on Sun. Feb. 10, 2019 under breeder judge Mrs. Claudia Pierro. DEALER LOVES TO PLAY IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Breeders/Owners/Handlers: Fred & Marcia Wolpert Wolpert’s Yorkshire Terriers, mwolpert2004@verizon.net

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OCALA WINTER CLUSTER

Ocala, FL . January 23-26 photos by Tom Weigand

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OCALA WINTER CLUSTER

Ocala, FL . January 23-26 photos by Tom Weigand

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BREEDING THE CHIHUAHUA FOR THE SHOW RING by Virginia (Jenny) Hauber

Photo of WynJyn Isadora, aka IZZY, the Iron Dog .

“P eople are creators. But I doubt that many realize this. We are not meant to go out into the world and find flawless things, we are not meant to sit down and have flawless things fall in our laps. But we are creators. We can create a beauti- ful thing out of what we have. The problem with idealistic people is that they see themselves as receivers and instead of creators they end up hunt- ing for the flaw in everything in order to measure it up to their ideals. Now when you see yourself as a creator, you can look at a chunk of marble and see an angel in it. Then you carve until you have set that angel free.” —C. JoyBell C. IDEALISM VS. REALISM We all know that statement, “There is no perfect dog.” If we believe this, why do we expect to breed our per- fect dog? Idealism is the behavior or thought based on a conception of things as they should be, or as they wish them to be, with a tendency to be imaginary or visionary. Whereas, re- alism is the behavior or thought based on a conception of things as they are, regardless of how one wants them to be with the tendency to be practical or pragmatic. Many new to the breeding process suffer from idealism. Although this is not a bad thing, one must have some realistic expectations when dealing with possibilities beyond our control. The genetics of dogs can be a huge handicap. Humans have 46 chromo- somes (23 pairs), versus a dog’s 78 (39 pairs). The arrangement or se- quence of the genes of chromosomes is astounding. So, when dealing with

living beings, we are at the mercy of genetics. Awareness of the intricate patters of heredity is a good way to begin to re- alize why traits don’t always fall into predictable patterns. The varying de- gree of dominant and recessive genes, as well as environment, will affect the outcome of your planned breeding. Just ask those who have been success- fully breeding for years and they will tell you of their early idealism and the puppy or puppies they wish they had kept. Their idealism got in the way and set their breeding program back another year or more. To ac- complish one’s goal in one generation is unrealistic. We also need to realize that there is an element of art to dog breeding. Successful breeders have honed their skills by experience, study and obser- vations. A little intuition doesn’t hurt either. The best genetics in the world can’t predict what will happen when two dogs are mated no matter how hard we strive for genetic reliability and consistency. Every generation is different. There truly is no set for- mula for success so sprinkle your ide- alism with a little realism and carve We all start at the same level but soon we think we know everything we need to produce our perfect dog. Eventu- ally we have to admit to ourselves that this probably is not the case and begin again. This is the point whenwe really begin to learn. It is natural to learn only our immedi- ate interests. As breeders, we need to until you set your angel free. NO SUBSTITUTE FOR GOOD BREEDING

broaden our boundaries. A champion- ship title does not guarantee perfec- tion. We must know and understand our Breed Standard, along with the anatomy of a dog, animal husbandry and genetics. Once we feel comfort- able with these aspects, we can begin our breeding program. It is always good to make it a habit to look at “virtues” first and “faults” last. Fault finders will override the total perspective of their dog which leaves a lingering impression. Compare the faults to the virtues. Do the virtues outweigh the faults? A true breeder must be willing to take a gamble with Mother Nature and take the worst along with the best. We must realize that each puppy is actually two different beings. We all understand there is no perfect dog so don’t be in a hurry for that great one. It is far better for a breeder to move slowly toward their goal by collect- ing virtues and discarding faults and tackling one problem at a time. The “overall” dog must be kept in mind. The best package has the best chance in the show ring. Most of us know that faults are about the construction of the the dog and failings are more about cosmetics. A dogs construction or “conformation” is the most important part of any animal. If a dog is not constructed properly, it isn’t moving properly and therefore cannot do the job it was cre- ated for.When you hear of a judge that likes “good movement”, it means they like a well constructed dog. They go hand in hand. We rarely see a fault such as a poor front or unleveled topline on a >

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VISTA LAFLEURS LOTUS T'SEAS MI G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N

© BOB KOHLER PHOTO

NEW YORK! PROGRESSIVE DOG CLUB BEST OF OPPOSITE OH GROUP 3 JUDGE ELAINE LESSIG,

WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB, SELECT UNDER MARK KENNEDY.

Deborah Long, T’Seas Mi Chihuahuas | Stephanie Schultes, Vista Chihuahuas, vistachis@gmail.com

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of the breed. Selection is what it is all about and it is the key to breeding suc- cess. An inability to look at your dogs objectively can wreck your dreams for the future and derail years of hard work. Successful breeders who pro- duce quality dogs year after year are consistent with their selection pro- cess. They maintain a picture of the type they are trying to produce and know the ingredients that make up that type. Your ability to select wisely will de- pend both on your in-depth knowl- edge of dogs in general and your breed specific knowledge. Read your standard until you know it forward and backward and understand what you are reading. Above all, think of the future of our breed when select- ing your next show dog. Probably one rule stands above others and that is, “Breed only the best to the best and don’t be satisfied with anything less.” To be successful we must truly be ob- jective as to what we choose to repro- duce or put in the show ring. We must strive to improve the next generation and once a problem is discovered in a breeding program, we much be prepared even to the point of start- ing over with new foundation stock. What sacrifices are you ready tomake on your road to happiness? Dreams do find direction and you can make yours come true.

since developing the “saucy” per- sonality isn’t the easiest task. There is nothing more beautiful to the eye than to see a gorgeous Chihuahua strutting around the show ring while enjoying every minute. Since temper- ament is an inherited trait, it should be highly considered during the selection process. SELECTION: THE FUTURE OF OUR BREED Our Parent Club, The Chihuahua Club of America and The Ameri- can Kennel Club are guardians of the Chihuahua Breed Standard. The breed standard is a blue print of specific physical qualities such as appearance, movement, and tem- perament. It is our “word picture” of the appearance and behavior of an idealized Chihuahua. The basis of judging in conforma- tion dog shows is breed type, which describes the characteristics that are typical of a particular breed. The judge looks at the entered dogs that most perfectly resembles their ideal bred type. The goal of the conforma- tion show is to identify breeding stock for the future of our breed. If we are doing our job as breeders with the best intentions for the future of our breed, some very good dogs will be neutered or spayed, while those that are even better will be retained for future breeding. It behooves all breeders to work in the best interest

top breeder’s dog, but we might see a failing such as less coat than desired or ears that are smaller than we like. Whileonebreeder selects a fabulously constructed dogwith amoderate head and longer muzzle for their breeding program, another might select a dog with a weak rear and low tails set who has an overdone head and beautiful coat. The breeder selecting the coat and head has just made the decision to continue structural faults in their breeding program. The old saying, “A dogs doesn’t walk on its head,” is something to keep inmind. The whole package of balance, beauty, quality, soundness and temperament is what all top breeders strive for. When you see the “total package” in the ring, you can be sure the breeder has done their homework and made structure selec- tion a top priority. Developing an eye for a good dog takes time. Every new breeder should be at the group ring watching each and every group of dogs so their eyes can adjust to how great dogs move. Once you have developed your “eye” for movement and balance, the selection of your breeding dogs will improve in record time. Virtues differ from person to person but good conformation, type, sub- stance, balance and soundness are essential. Temperament is of great concern for the Chihuahua breeder

THE CHIHUAHUA magazine during its run. She has enjoyed being a sweepstakes judge at the Nashville Chihuahua Club’s specialty and has served on many club com- mittees throughout her time in the show dog world. Virginia began her love of the Chihuahua when she was just a young girl and got her first little one, Susie. Later, she raised work- ing Aussies before they were AKC approved and when she decided to enter the dog show world, she chose her long love of the Chihua- hua to show because they reminded her of the Australian Shepherd in a tiny package. Now 25 years later, she is still actively showing her dogs, writing about them and advocating for purebred dogs of top quality so that families will have four-legged family members who will be sound, healthy and long lived.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Virginia (Jenny) Hauber began exhibiting Chihuahuas in the 1990s after a lifetime of owning and breeding purebred dogs. As the breeder/owner/handler of WynJyn Chihua- huas, she has produced numerous Top 20 dogs, National Specialty winners and the 2014 Number 1 Agility Chihuahua who was also the first and only Iron Dog Chihuahua. She has been an active member of the Chi- huahua Club of America as well as a mem- ber of the Nashville, Atlanta and Dixieland Chihuahua Clubs. She was the AKC Gazette Chihuahua Breed Column writer for over five years and has had numerous articles in other dog publications. She was the 2005 co-editor of the Chihuahua Club of Amer- ica Handbook and on the editorial team of

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PHOTOS BY ©DEMPSEY PHOTOGRAPHY *TNT ALL BREED STATS 2019

**TNT BREED STATS 2019 ***AKC NOHS STATS 2019

BI SS GCHB TERL INGUA F I FTY SHADES OF CHARL IE TANGO

BISS, BOSS, Multiple BOV Specialty, Multiple Regular Group Placing NOHS BIS, NOHS RBIS, NOHS Multiple Group Placing 2019 Ranked Top 20 All Breed * and Top 20 Breed ** Longcoat Chihuahua 2019 NOHS #5 Longcoat *** 2019 NOHS Finals BOV Longcoat 2018 Royal Canin Puppy Stakes BOV Longcoat OFA Passed All Heath Testing

Owner Handled from Class Dog to Special by Junior Handler Mari lyn Dempsey Bred By Terlingua Chihuahuas-Cara Ryckman

GCH TERL INGUA DARK S IDE DAZZLER

2019 Chihuahua Club of America National Specialty Award of Merit winner NOHS Multiple Group Placing 2019 NOHS Ranked #9 Smoothcoat *** 2019 Ranked #24 Breed Smoothcoat ** OFA Passed All Heath Testing Owner Handled from Class Dog to Special by Junior Handler Mari lyn Dempsey Bred By Terlingua Chihuahuas-Cara Ryckman

T op N otch T oys , M arch 2020 • 35

HISTORY OF THE CHIHUAHUA T he origin of the Chihuahua is not clearly understood. There have been Chihuahua-like images found throughout the world, in- by Art Johnson

the legs/movement. The mouth/teeth should be scissor or may also be even. The ideal puppy will be inquisitive and not shy away when approached. It should interact well with other pup- pies of similar age. HEALTH The Chihuahua is a relative health breed. The most prominent health issue facing the Chihuahua is lux- ating patellas. This occurs when the kneecap tendons are weak and when the leg moves in a certain way slips, resulting in the dog limping or otherwise favoring the leg when moving it. Another common test is for heart murmur. This testing can be done by your veterinarian. Although small in size, the Chihua- hua is a fierce competitor in the con- firmation (“show”) ring, obedience trials and rally. Chihuahuas have excelled in each of these venues, reaching all-breed Best in Show (confirmation), High in Trial (obe- dience) and Mach ratings (rally). The breed also participates in the AKC-sponsored Canine Good Citi- zenship (CGC) recognition pro- gram. The breed also is involved in Service-related activities, includ- ing Therapy Dog title achievement and recognition. AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB EVENTS

feature—they are otherwise identical. The Chihuahua is a treasured, dimin- utive companion that consistently ranks high in all breeds in popularity and in the show ring. FORM AND FUNCTION The Chihuahua is foremost a com- panion dog. It is a graceful, alert, swift-moving little dog with a saucy expression, compact and with terrier- like qualities of temperament. The smooth coat variety is easy to groom with brush and comb, with the long coat requiring brushing occa- sionally as needed. The Chihuahua has relatively few health problems. SELECTING A PUPPY The Chihuahua is the smallest of the AKC-recognized breeds. While the dog world’s smallest member, they are a hardy breed, adapting to well to city and country settings; small apartment to stately mansions. With a life-span of 15 to 20 years, the pur- chase of a puppy is a commitment in time and resources that must be seriously considered. When selecting your puppy, the of- ficial standard for the Chihuahua is a good starting reference point. The puppy should move effortlessly, with- out limping or skipping. Eyes should be large and clear/ bright. Ears upright and alert. Back should be straight and flat to support

cluding the Far and Near East, Cen- tral and South America and in parts of Europe. It is agreed by many historians that the Chihuahua is a native of Mexico. The Toltecs of ancient Mexico kept a small dog called Techichi. Evidence of this is clearly seen in stone carvings in a Toltec monastery in the Mexico City area. When the Aztecs conquered the Toltecs in the twelfth century, they brought with them small hairless dogs similar to dogs found in China. One theory is that the present-day Chihuahua originated with the cross- ing of those two early breeds. Upon conquest of the Aztecs by Cor- tez in the early 1500s, the small dog was lost for centuries. Evidence of the modern breed’s first specimens were discovered in the State of Chihuahua in the mid-1800’s. The breed’s history in the United States began about 1850, with the first importationsmainly from the State of Chihuahua—hence their name. In the late 1800’s the first Chihuahua was seen at a dog show in Philidelphia. The first American Kennel Club Chi- huahua conformation champion was a dog named “Beepie” in 1905. There are two varieties of Chihua- huas—long coat and smooth coat. Except for this distinguishing

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JUDGING THE MIN PIN by Larry Dewey

J udging the Min Pin should not be very difficult if you can under- stand several key points. It is a real treat to see a dog or bitch that moves with the proper gait and an outgoing personality. Keep in mind the traits mentioned at the be- ginning of the standard, which are: hackney-like action, fearless anima- tion and complete self-possession. The gait seems to be the misunder- stood trait. The standard says: “The forelegs and hind legs move parallel, with feet turning neither in or out. The action is a high-stepping, reach- ing, free and easy gait in which the front leg moves straight forward and in front of the body, the foot bends at the wrist. The dog drives smoothly and strongly from the rear. The head and tail are carried high.” I feel the gait is compromised when the gait has a high lift; but elbows are out and feet are crossing. Many times the dogs are held back to show off the lift and the dog goes nowhere, showing no smooth driving rear. Some judges believe that since the Min Pin is the only breed with the hackney-like action that if they lift and break at the wrist, they should be rewarded even if they are not sound. I believe that you go with soundness even if the lift and break are moderate. Fearless animation and complete self-possession. Never reward shy- ness such a tail and ears down. Ears sometimes are laid back while

gaiting which is not unusual. TheMin Pin comes from a Terrier background and should be alert at all times, which sometimes makes fora very short attention span. Loud noises may distract and startle them, but they should recover almost immediately, except for puppies and they should be allowed some latitude. It is normal for them to bounce or jump over tapes. They should not be expected to main- tain gait. To keep this animation, breeder’s try not to correct puppies too often in the ring. Correct balance is very important in the Min Pin. The Head should be in proportion to the body with no indi- cation of coarseness. The bite must be scissor. Eyes should be full, slightly oval, clear and dark even to true black, including eye rims, chocolates should be self colored. Ears set high, stand- ing erect base to tip, cropped or un- cropped and should be judged equally. Too short a neck is a problem in our breed. It really affects balance. The top line can be level to slightly sloping with the croup level with top line and the tail set high and held erect. If you need to re-examine a dog, have the handler place it back on the table. Do not touch the dog on the floor. The disqualifications are: size—under 10 inches or over 12 1/2 inches. If you are in doubt, please measure them. Color—Any color other than: Black/ Rust, Chocolate/Rust, Red and Stag Red. White hair on any part of the

dog which exceeds 1/2 inch in its longest dimension. Thumb prints— many times Judges are confused by the thumb print. It must be a patch of black or chocolate hair surrounded by rust on the front of the foreleg. An ex- tension of the black or chocolate from the upper leg to the wrist or foot is a miss mark not a disqualification. Problems I see in the breed right now are: length of neck, soft top lines, low tail sets, large feet, lack of reach and drive and shyness. Traditionally, the Min Pin is shown standing free. A correct self-pos- sessed Min Pin needs no help from the handler when standing free. To sum up you are looking for a well balanced, sturdy, compact, short-cou- pled smooth-coated dog with fearless temperament and a hackney-like ac- tion, truly the king of Toys.

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GCHS SHADOWMIST’S PVT. BAILEY OF MUNROC

*TNT BREED STATS AS OF 1/31/20 NUMBER 6 MIN PIN *

PRESENTED BY CARRIE ROSENKOETTER BREEDERS-OWNERS CATHY BEASLEY RHONDA CORNUM

OWNERS PHYLLIS KALMES & MARTIN KALMES CATHY BEASLEY RHONDA CORNUM R. HALLAHAN

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LIVING WITH MIN PINS by Gretchen Hofheins-Wackerfuss

I grew up showing American Sad- dlebred horses, a high stepping and powerful horse that had a lot of excitement. At that time owned a Yorkshire Terrier that I showed in Obedience. I wanted a second dog that didn’t require as much grooming and had a lot of zip. The Miniature Pinscher has a lot of the same attri- butes as the American Saddlebred, with their high stepping free and easy gait, so I was immediately attracted to them. I acquired my first Min Pin after much research, in 1987, from a breeder in Tucson, Arizona, Dee Stutts. She had quite a few dogs that had done well in obedience. I have been captivated by them ever since. They are the most loving and mis- chievous dogs I have ever met. It is like having a big dog in a small pack- age. They are ferocious watch dogs and amusing little clowns. Their in- telligence makes them very trainable, but that intelligence also can get them into trouble. I recall once at my home I was work- ing in my office, I heard a commotion in the kitchen. I came in to find a cou- ple dogs on the floor barking at one of my dogs, Sylvia, who was on the coun- ter with the cupboard open, pulling food, flour and such on to the floor. I have no idea how she got up there, but it must have taken a lot of will. Her cohorts below were egging her on! I never laughed so hard. That is but one story of many. The breed originated

in Germany, and as many people think, they are NOT bred down from the Doberman Pinscher, but a sepa- rate breed, which is much older than the Doberman. They were used as ‘ratters’ on farms, and that prey drive still exists. I recall chasing one of my dogs around the yard with a pooper scooper trying to get her to drop the chipmunk she had caught. Owning a Min Pin is like having an eternal toddler. You must be alert all the time for what mischief they can get into. The dogs that I have owned must ‘earn’ their right to be free in the house. Even then they need su- pervision. One of my dogs I have now, Edgar, he will get into anything that has the slightest scent of food. My husband brings a canvas bag to work. If there is anything such as gum or mints in it, Edgar gets into it and brings his little ‘prize’ into his dog bed and eats it, leaving just the wrapping or container. They also do love to snuggle. It is not uncommon to find a Min Pin on the sofa, burrowed under a blanket. My house dogs sleep in bed, yes, under the covers. We have an array of ‘fleece sleeping bags’ around the house for them and they are happiest in one of these, even on a hot day. They do get along with other breeds of dogs and cats. I caution you to su- pervise their play, especially if their housemate is a larger breed, as the play session can be rambunctious >

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with a Min Pin, and we don’t want anyone to get hurt. Miniature Pin- schers look frail, but they really are very sturdy. I caution you with young dogs, 3-9 months, as they really do think they are invincible, and can jump off things like they are ‘Super- man’, and while their growth plate in their legs is still growing, they can be broken if hit just right. When in exer- cise pens they remind people of pogo sticks, how they can jump 24"+ verti- cally, many times jumping out of the pen. So always have your eye on the x-pen when you are exercising them!

Min Pins are very smart. They ex- cel in obedience, rally, nosework and agility. They love to have a ‘job’ to do. The CGC test is a great place to start with a Min Pin. You need to find a good training center that will help you train yourMin Pin. Training your Min Pin in conformation is not as easy as it looks either. A Min Pin can be unpredictable. I recall a few years back of a professional handler that wanted a nice smooth coated toy dog to show, a Min Pin he thought might be nice. He acquired one to show and found that what they were lacking for

in grooming preparation to show, they made up for in their showmanship, which was not easy. They are like a flea on a leash. You never know what they are going to do. He was humbled by the experience and had respect for those who dared to handle them. We who are Min Pin fanciers love the fact that they are unpredictable, smart, cuddly, great watch dogs all in a small neat package. They are a fun dog to own, but not for everyone. If you own a Min Pin you must be pre- pared for all the fun, you are about to embark upon!

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Spanky G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N O A K H U R S T ’ S G O O D M O R N I N G C A P T A I N A M E R I C A

SPANKY takes a bite of the big apple, by earning an AWARD OF MERIT at the prestigious WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB! Thank you Mr. Mark Kennedy for this honor! OAKHURST • MARIBETH MITCHELL BOPP • BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLER • AKC BREEDER OF MERIT • YTCA TOP BREEDER

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*

*TNT all breed stats as of 12/31/19

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REMEMBER YOUR MENTORS by Richard Miller

I have been judging over 25 years. When I have a breed on my exami- nation table, I still “hear” what men- tors told me about specific breeds. These remarks are priceless until the standard changes. We all know what AKC tells us about foreign substanc- es. When I judge the Yorkie, I am re- minded what Roberta Rothenback told me. She said, “If the color looks too good to be true; it is not”. She went further to say that each strand of hair will not be perfectly the same. You need to get into the coat and make an assessment of the presence of a coat color altered by foreign sub- stance was also part of her mentor- ing. No judge is so skilled as to make an absolute judgement regarding a “foreign substance”. JoeWaltonwas one of mymentors for his breed, Shih Tzu. He said, “Dick, you have to get into the top knot and determine is a correctly sized head is under there. Too many pin heads are being rewarded.” I never forget his marks when I judge this breed. I feel the head side to side and from occiput to muzzle. Peggy Hogg, long time professional handler and finally well respected judge was a mentor for me with Mal- tese. Peggy lived just a bit more than an hour from me when I first began to show dogs. She stressed the impor- tance of sound pigment in this breed. She cautioned me to check the eye rims and pads of feet as well as eye color. She reminded me that strong pigment and dark eyes make for the correct expression. When I began to judge Peggy would seek me out and give me point- ers about a specific exhibit she

had judged. I remember her com- ing to me and encouraging me to have a look at an American Staf- fordshire Terrier. She reminded me what the breed standard says about nose color. The dog she wanted me to have a look at was a blue dog. She said the nose cannot be black with the dilute pigment. She went on to say that the animal exudes correct breed type in spite of its nose leather. This was an invaluable mentoring experience among others that Peggy shared with me. I attended the national specialty of the Japanese Chin years ago. The person that presented the education shared his feeling about the impor- tance of the phrase: “a small amount of white showing in the inner corner of the eyes is a breed characteristic that gives the dog the look of astonish- ment.” This phrase is a quote from the breed standard. A well known professional handler showed a very nice Japanese Chin bitch for an extended period of time. I never rewarded the dog with a group one. She finally asked me what I ob- jected to with regard to her entry. I told her the expression of the dog did not please me. She told me that white in the corners of the eyes is no longer an expectation. I checked the stan- dard after this encounter. I learned the phrase is still in the standard. The Miniature Pinscher is a breed that I have known since childhood. My maternal grandpa had a pair long before I began to exhibit in the show ring. The Min-Pin was one of the first breeds I was approved to judge. Again a phrase from the standard: “characteristic traits are his hackney

like action” set this dog and its movement apart from other breeds in the toy group. I was challenged by a Min-Pin exhibitor for select- ing only entries that had “hackney like action”. This person told me the year that the phrase was added to the standard and said it really is not that important. The phrase comes from the paragraph regarding gen- eral appearance. I consider it to be of critical importance. I am now approved to judge four groups. This is something I take very seriously. I find it necessary from time to time to refer back to the breed standard while I am judg- ing. I would much rather make a judgement call after referring to the standard than to “think I know what the wording in the standard really is.” Fashions change with the presenta- tion of dogs for the show ring, but I hope I am regarded as a judge that judges by the standard approved for each breed. I know what I heard at the breed seminar for the Poodle. In spite of hearing this, a Toy Poodle is still described as being 10" or under. I also know that the UK has a differ- ent size limit. Until the AKC standard changes, I will call for the wicket and measure an entry that seems to be oversized. I have also called for the wicket for a Miniature Poodle that appears to exceed 15". I encourage exhibitors to know their breed standard before you approach- ing me regarding my placement of their entry. I like to discuss my place- ments with exhibitor that are well grounded in knowledge of the breed standard for their breed.

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