Showsight May 2021

GCH Dassin Kiarry ' s Tulip Garden Night At the Opera Cardi

GCH Dassin Kiarry ' s Tulip Garden Night At the Opera Cardi

AMERICAN FOXHOUND

SAMOYED

Elford.indd 1

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CHINESE CRESTED, SPANIEL (COCKER) PARTI

*AKC STATS AS OF 3/31/21

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AFFENPINSCHER

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

*AKC STATS AS OF 3/31/21

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Zen GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen

#1 GRAND CHAMPION SYSTEM *

#2 BREED SYSTEM *

#4 ALL-BREED SYSTEM *

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

*AKC STATS AS OF 3/31/2021

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MALTESE

©HAN ‘21

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS, CM4 Win

#1 ALL BREED STANDINGS * *AKC stats as of 3/31/21

Owned by Michele Lyons, Cindi Iken, Daniel Yona, Noble Inglett and Theresa Tafoya

Thank you Judges Mrs. Cindi Meyer, Mrs. Anne Savory Bolus and Mr. Ken Murray

CH ZINAIR ROSSITA, CM Tasha

NEW CHAMPION

Bred by Daniel Konti Kennels Owned by Michele Lyons and Daniel Yona

Thank you Judges Mr. John Wade, Mrs. Fred Bassett, Mrs. Terry Berrios, Mrs. Anne Sacvory Bolus, and Mrs. Erika Moureau

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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BIEWER TERRIER

POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

#1 BREED STANDING * *AKC stats as of 3/31/21

FIRST BRONZE GRAND CHAMPION Bred by Irena Belova Owned by Michele Lyons, Theresa Tafoya, Daniel Yona and Noble Inglett Proudly shown by Tonia Holibaugh and Edgar Cruz Guevara Donny GCHB IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA, CM7

Thank you Judges Mr. Fred Bassett, Mr. John Wade, Mrs. Janie Bousek, Mrs. Loraine Boutwell,

Mr. Bradley Jenkins, Mrs. Terry Berrios, Mrs. Erika Moureau, Mrs. Barbara Dempsey Alderman,

Ms. Nikki Riggsbee, and Mr. Dana Cline

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

*AKC stats as of 3/31/21

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CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

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After laying low during the pandemic THIS TERRIFIC TEAM IS OFF TO A DYNAMITE START!

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER 2020 WESTMINSTER BOB WINNER MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER

WATCH FOR HIMWITH DARYL IN THE TOY GROUP

THANK YOU JUDGES FOR A GREAT START TO 2021!

Owned by ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

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MALTESE

OUR FIRSTWEEKENDS OUT IN 2021!

FLASH! TIMEBOMBWINS ANOTHER ALL-BREED BEST IN SHOWAND BACK-TO-BACK GROUP ONES! JANESVILLE-BELOIT KC

GROUP SECOND - DR. ADAM KING GROUP SECOND - LORAINE BOUTWELL GROUP SECOND - JANIE BOUSEK GROUP THIRD - MR. ROBERT HUTTON GROUP THIRD - MR. EUGENE BLAKE

Bred, Owned and Handled by DARYL MARTIN

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*

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DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

*

*

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*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/21

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

Owned by: Karen Pipkin & Charles Pipkin

Bred by: Karen Pipkin & Dr. Christina A.Wistrom Exclusively Handled by: Chris & Dylan Keith, Kataire Handling

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NORWICH TERRIER

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GRANDCRU LE PIN II

JUDGE COL. JOE PURKHISER BIS CONROE KENNEL CLUB

Bred by MELANIE STEELE & RINDI GAUDET Owned by DEBORAH BAHM & ASHLIE WHITMORE Handled by ASHLIE WHITMORE & ALFONSO ESCOBEDO

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GREYHOUND

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multiple B ISS wi nn i ng group wi nn i ng

thank you

JUDGES

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

owned by JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO ,

MOLLY LATHAM & L ISA BURROFF

bred by KERRI KOTT &

HOLLY H . SCHORR

always owner handled by

L ISA BURROFF

tessa GCHG PENNYLANE OLE T IME STYLE V SYNERGY

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*

*AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 12/31/20

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POODLE (MINIATURE)

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HAREHILL’S I INSIST grand champion

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IBIZAN HOUND

#1 IBIZAN HOUND *

*AKC breed stats as of 3/31/21

Bred by Bradley Phifer &Wendy Anderson

Presented by Kelly Wisch-Shupp

Owned by Bradley Phifer

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A ONCE IN A LIFETIME DOG

NOW PROUDLY SHOWN FROM THE VETERAN CLASSES

THANK YOU BREEDER JUDGES LOUANNE LENNER AND LYNN ANDRESON POWELL

30 BEST IN SHOW 23 RESERVE BEST IN SHOW 31 BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW

2 NATIONAL SPECIALTY BEST IN SHOW #1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL BREED 2016-2020** #1 NEWFOUNDLAND ALL SYSTEMS 2017-2020*

#6 WORKING DOG 2017 #9 WORKING DOG 2018 #4 WORKING DOG 2019

LOVED & OWNED BY: KATHY WORTHAM • CO-OWNED BY: MARY W. PRICE & CAROL BERGMANN LOVED, OWNED & PRESENTED BY: KIM & GIGI GRIFFITH • BRED BY: GIGI GRIFFITH & CAROL BERGMANN

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NEWFOUNDLAND

OCEANO DARBYDALE’S XECUTIVE DECISION

WE ARE EVER SO GRATEFUL AND PROUD TO HAVE RECENTLY WON 4 BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINS FROM THE VETERAN CLASS AND A TRIPLE CROWN BEST OF THE BEST! SPECIALTY WINS UNDER BREEDER JUDGES INGRID LYDEN, LYNNE HAMILTON, LOUANN LENNER, AND LYNN ANDERSON POWELL, AND BEST OF THE BEST WIN BY LYNNE HAMILTON! THANK YOU FOR ACKNOWLEDGING THE ONGOING QUALITY OF THIS VERY SPECIAL DOG!

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AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER 1.512.541.8128, AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM HANIFA ARAPOVIC CO-OWNER & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1.512.686.3466, HANIFA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM MICHAEL VERAS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER 1.512.893.6906, MICHAEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, HEAD OF DIGITAL BRANDS 1.908.288.7733, ALEX@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM DANIEL CARTIER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION CO-ORDINATOR 1.512.686.3466, DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM SAMANTHA ADKINS PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR, ADVERTISER RELATIONS 1.512.893.6908, SAMANTHA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ADVERTISING AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.541.8128 BONNIE GUGGENHEIM BONNIE@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM 512-971-3280 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS BJ ANDREWS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR ANDREA BRADFORD ARLENE CZECH KARL DONVIL CHRISTINE ERICKSON CELESTE GONZALEZ STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS WALTER SOMMERFELT LEE WHITIER SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIĆ MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA & CREATIVE CONTENT ELMA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.686.3466 INSTAGRAM | @SHOWSIGHTMAG FACEBOOK | WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SHOWSIGHT/ TWITTER | @THESHOWSIGHT GENERAL INQUIRIES: INFO@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM SUBSCRIPTIONS: SUBSCRIPTIONS@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM THE FROST TOWER 401 CONGRESS AVE SUITE 1540 AUSTIN, TX 78701 | 1.512.686.3466 WWW.SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM PROUDLY DESIGNED & PRINTED IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA USA

GCH Dassin Kiarry ' s Tulip Garden Night At the Opera Cardi

AMERICAN FOXHOUND

Charles Foxhound FC.indd 4

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BRUSSELS GRIFFON

CONTENTS

42

Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC

58

How Enforceable Are My Dog Contracts? GOOD DOG

GCH Dassin Kiarry ' s Tulip Garden Night At the Opera Cardi

62

Mimi Winkler Breeder Interview ALLAN REZNIK

Charles Foxhound FC.indd 4

74

Memories Captured LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

86

Form Follows Function STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

92

Litter Size and the Singleton Puppy DR. CARMEN L. BATTAGLIA

220 ShowSight in Circulation

108 Heartworm Preventative 2021 Update BJ ANDREWS

JEANIE MCADAMS & KRISTINA ESTLUND

224 Herding Group VARIOUS GUESTS

120 Calling All Dogs with DCM for Research Study EMBARK

255 Anatolian Shepherd VARIOUS GUESTS

124

Following Your Dreams and Goals WALTER J. SOMMERFELT

262 Chinese Crested VARIOUS GUESTS

168

Breeding with Intention CELESTE M. GONZALEZ

264 Retrievers

183

Ring Ready: Owner Handler Firsts DAN SAYERS

VARIOUS GUESTS

287 Toy Fox Terrier VARIOUS GUESTS

184

Ring Ready: How to Rise to the Top 20 Percent LEE WHITTIER

292 Coming Attractions

198

Ring Ready: OH & BOH Survey VALERIE SCHLUTER & MICHELLE ERICKSON

294 Index to Advertisers

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/21 SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, MAY 2021 | 39

YORKSHIRE TERRIER

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

DEAR FRIENDS,

W henever I write my monthly message, I truly don’t prepare—not one bit. Every single message is typed up at the last minute. Month after month, I tell myself that I will take a few days to write my message. But I never do, and it just seems that I don’t do this for a reason. I feel that my mes- sages are most authentic when they are not overly edited and, knowing myself, if I allowed more than a few hours before we are off to the printer, I would rewrite my message many times and it could lose some of its authenticity. What matters the most to me are Health, Family, Friends—and our Clients (YOU)! And the only way for me to prove this is to provide exceptional customer service. SHOW- SIGHT can’t provide exceptional customer service if our team isn’t happy. If we aren’t able to be who we truly are—authentic—then we stand no chance of producing the best work for our community. SHOWSIGHT isn’t run by grumpy people. We are a family of visionaries and innova- tors who just loves to work hard, live a comfortable life, and make others smile. As everyone knows, we have been making a lot of changes over the past couple of years, and we haven’t even scratched the surface yet. There’s more—lots more—to come. What I believe makes us special here is that every single decision revolves around what will be the best for our community as a whole, and never about what will serve this person or that person, or this club and that club. And, if you really take a look at everything closely and think about it, you will know that these aren’t just our words. As they say, “The proof is in the pudding.” We will soon be announcing two amazing individuals who will help us take SHOWSIGHT , SHOWSIGHT EXPRESS , and RING-READY to new heights. Once announced, I am sure that you will recognize their names if you haven’t already had a lot of interaction with them through the years at dog shows. Hey, I am so sorry if I must make this message short. We are about to go to press in a couple hours and I’ve already gotten three phone calls from the press asking, “Where is your message? !” Well, anyway, all I want to say is that I am on “cloud nine” right now because dog shows are back. I have not had this much fun putting an issue together for a while, and it is because the level of stress has been minimal. This is due to the fact that everyone I’ve interacted with this month has been so happy about being able to attend dog shows again. Clubs—Show Chairs—you have your work cut out for yourselves this year because entries will max-out quickly. You might even consider making your show a day or two longer. For those who are still on the fence about whether to open your show back up, please do. If you need assistance with anything, please contact me directly at 512.541.8128 or aj@aramediagroup.com . If my team and I can’t personally assist, we will help you find someone who can and will be happy to do so. Let’s work together to help our community bring back dog shows around the country. It’s time! Looking forward to seeing y’all at upcoming shows. And, if anyone sees me getting car- ried away by coming too close to everyone, please feel free to warn me. But understand that I just can’t help myself. Hugs and Kisses is what it’s all about. Okay, and ribbons too!

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

Est 1992

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Andy SHUT UP AND KISS ME GCH XERALANE’S

Heartfelt gratitude to judges Ms. Grace Fritz for Best in Show and Ms. Diane Anderson for the Group One

Handled by DEVON KIPP

1 No. Lhasa Apso NO. 7 NON-SPORTING ALL-BREED *

*

Team Andy XERALANE KENNEL, ADRIAN AGARD, EARL TAKAHASHI, BONNIE PRATO, CLIVE HARROLD & CAROL AGARD

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LHASA APSO

*AKC STATS AS OF 3/31/21

AROUND THE RING / CHERRY BLOSSOM CLUSTER

CHERRYBLOSSOMCLUSTER BALTIMORECOUNTYKENNELCLUB &OLDDOMINIONKENNELCLUB

Timonium, Maryland | April 23-25, 2021 | photos by Jean Edwards

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OWNER HANDLER CHRIS LEITKOWSKI BREEDER SUSAN A. THOMAS ZEB B I S S M B I S O H G C H S C H CAMELOT ’ S ZEBULON HERNE CD BN SH CGC TK I SD NRD VX

WEIMARANER CLUB OF AMERICA WINTER SPECIALTY BEST IN AMERICA’S # 1 SPORTING DOG NOHS 2020 * *AKC NOHS STATS 2020 TOP 10 2020 ALL SYSTEMS ** **AKC STATS 2020 SPECIALTY SHOW THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED ZEB’S BREED TYPE & MOVEMENT

© JORDON ISOM PHOTOGRAPHY

© JEANIE TROYAN McADAMS

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WEIMARANER

FEATURED TREAT

Compete Stronger Together.

WHEN YOU ASK FOR THEIR BEST THEY’LL BE READY.

HIGH CALORIES for LONG LASTING ENERGY

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CONVENIENT INDIVIDUAL TUBES

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provides ESSENTIAL VITAMINS, MINERALS AND AMINO ACIDS

DOGSWELL.COM LEARN MORE AT

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

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AROUND THE RING / BALTIMORE COUNTY KENNEL CLUB & OLD DOMINION KENNEL CLUB

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Your breed’s future depends

Get the full picture by testing your breed’s genetic health risk, traits, and COI.

SPRINGSHOW . Ends May 31, 2021.

on what you know today.

EmbarkVet.com/breeders

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, MAY 2021 | 49

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GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

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LEONBERGER

GROUP WINNER | MULTIPLE GROUP PLACEMENTS BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER

BISS GCHG BLUDRIFT’S ESCAPADES WITH ETHAN CGC

Ethan HANDLED BY CHELSAY PAUL GRUB OWNED BY MARY MONAHAN & LUANNE MOEDE BRED BY LUANNE MOEDE LEONBERGER * America's # 1 *AKC all systems stats as of 4/30/21

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Bon Idèe Bouviers Bonideebouv@yahoo.com T H A N K YO U J U D G E V I N C E N T M U L L I G A N

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BOUVIER DES FLANDRES

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N E R

Looking For Top Gun

GCH Bon Idèe’s Quantico

B R E D A N D OWN E D BY A N G I E MOT TA A N D B R E N DA WAT S O N P R O F E S S I O N A L LY P R E S E N T E D BY C A R LO S C A R R I Z O A S S I S T E D BY S O N O H O YA M A DA

B O N I D È E B O U V I E R S B O N I D E E B O U V@ YA H O O . C OM

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

How Enforceable Are My Dog Contracts?

T here’s a legal side to dog breeding that we often like to forget about. Agreements and contracts that seem like complicated, messy, and expen- sive distractions that take us away from our dogs are, in fact, useful tools that can assist in the management of a successful breeding program. Solid contracts can actually allow us to focus more time and attention on our dogs. THE TOP 3 CONTRACT QUESTIONS DOG BREEDERS WANT TO KNOW Q: Do I need to call my contract a “contract” for it to be legally enforceable? A: No. A contract should have a clear title, date, and should clearly state the signatories. However, it does not need to be named a “contract.” The title should be concise and it should reflect the main pur- pose. For example, many dog breeders refer to their contracts for the sale of a companion dog as a “Pet Purchase Agree- ment,” “Puppy Contract,” or “Pet Sale Agreement.” The term “agreement” in a title is actually more common than the term “contract,” but there is no difference in meaning or enforceability. Q: What is a verbal contract, and is a verbal contract enforceable? A: When two or more parties come to an agreement without any written documentation, they create a verbal contract. Verbal contracts can be legally enforceable. That said, it is typically best practice to create a written contract in order to avoid any future disputes over a party’s obligations. It can be difficult to prove the existence of a verbal contract, as well as the terms the parties agreed to. If you do enter into a verbal contract, you might consider sending some form of written documentation (e.g., a letter or an email) confirming the agreed upon terms, to serve as

“Having been sued by a puppy owner, I will tell you that it was the contract that made the difference. Contracts matter!” – Susan Patterson, Fenwyck Labradors

Good Dog has created a Legal Resource Center with sample dog contracts, legal webinars, a breeder-friendly lawyers list and more—just for dog breeders. Learn more at www.gooddog.com/join.

written proof that a valid contract was made. Q: Are non-refundable deposits permitted?

A: Yes. However, for all deposits (refundable or non- refundable), it is important that both the breeder and the buyer know exactly what the deposit covers and the terms of the deposit’s refund policy before any funds are exchanged.

continued on page 58

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HOW ENFORCEABLE ARE MY DOG CONTRACTS?

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

As a matter of best practice, we recommend that you clearly explain your deposit/refund policy to the buyer and put it in writing (in a purchase agreement, invoice, and/or separate deposit agree- ment). You should incorporate as many details as possible, including (1) identifying the litter, (2) stating whether or not the deposit will be put toward the full purchase price, and (3) listing out the circum- stances when the deposit is refundable. For all legal matters, I would also recommend having an attor- ney that is licensed to practice law in your state review your contract because the requirements may vary from state to state.

COMMUNICATION IS KEY At the end of the day, communication is essential to having a successful contractual relationship. The con- tract should serve as a tool for you to reflect an agree- ment or “meeting of the minds” between two or more parties. Whether it is with a puppy buyer, co-owner, guardian or other counterparty, clearly stating the intentions of each party and making sure all parties are aligned helps to prevent future disputes and complica- tions down the line.

Good Dog’s Legal Resource Center was built to empower you with free & exclusive:

• Sample Dog Contracts for limited and full registration puppy sales, co-owner- ships, non-refundable deposits, guardian homes, a power of attorney, and more. We recognize that every breeding program is unique, and there is no one-contract- fits-all solution. All of our contracts are annotated to flag points you should con- sider—and speak to your lawyer about—to ensure you’re addressing the specific needs of your situation. • Legal Webinars on important topics such as how breeders can identify and avoid scammers, how to protect your photos from being stolen, and how to prepare for your dogs’ futures without you (also known as “estate planning”). • A Recommended Breeder-Friendly Lawyers List. While the Good Dog Legal Team can’t directly represent breeders in our community, we can help you find someone who can.

• Legal Advocacy against misguided and overreaching anti-breeder legislation. We’ve published articles, like Reasons Anti-Breeder Legislation is Harmful and Dangerous , written letters to legislators, including most recently to Assemblymember Miguel Santiago regarding California Bill 702, helped our Good Breeders prepare for public hearings, including in Cobb County, Georgia, and are regularly sharing legal alerts on our Good Breeder Center Facebook page. Our Legal Resource Center is a free and exclusive benefit for members of our community. Good Dog is free for breeders who pass our screening and comply with our Community Standards. In fact, you cannot pay to join. Learn more at www. gooddog.com/join and mention ShowSight to get priority treatment, or scan the QR code below.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Cat Matloub , Esq., Head of Legal Affairs at Good Dog

Cat received her law degree from University of Chicago Law School, and worked as a corporate lawyer for Skadden in New York and as the Director of Business & Legal Affairs at Sony Music before joining Good Dog. As Head of Legal Affairs at Good Dog, Cat has provided free mediation services to settle disputes amongst breeders and between breeders and their buyers.

This article is provided for informational purposes only, and shall not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. Legal advice is dependent upon the specific circumstances of each situation and laws may vary from state to state. For legal matters, Good Dog recommends connecting with a lawyer in your state if you are able. Good Dog expressly disclaims all liability in respect of actions taken or not taken based on any or all of the contents in this article. DISCLAIMER

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Movement, Type and Style - The Legacy Continues

SIRED BY CHIP - MBIS NBISS CH KIMANI’S BLUE CHIP IMAGE, JC ROM

© HAN 2020

Samburu

GCHG Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, MAUREEN TAUBER & DEBBIE HOLLY

BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

SukAri

Ch Lyonnese Confection in Gold

OWNED BY DEBBIE HOLLY, MAUREEN TAUBER & SUSAN OHANESIAN BRED/OWNED/HANDLED BY DEBBIE HOLLY BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

MIMI WINKLER JUDGES CHOICE BICHONS FRISES BREEDER INTERVIEW BY ALLAN REZNIK

Where did you grow up? I was born in Manhattan and grew up in The Bronx, in a neighborhood that lent itself to playing stickball, hopscotch, and staying outside until your mom called you in for dinner. A warm, friendly neighborhood that was home to many future nota- bles. Going to private school in Manhattan, running through Central Park from the East Side to the West Side without a care in the world, is something our children, sadly, will never be able to appreciate. Do you come from a doggy family? If not, how did the interest in breeding and show- ing purebred dogs begin? The answer to this is simple… NO, I do not come from a dog family at all. I can- not remember a time when I didn’t say to myself, “When I grow up and leave this house, I will buy a dog.” And so I did, from Poodles to Dachshunds to Old English Sheepdogs. Then, when I was in Stuttgart, Germany, judging a gymnastics meet, I saw a woman walking two white dogs. I went over to ask her about them. Between my broken German and her broken English, I found out the breed... Bichon Frise. When I got back to the States, I went to a dog show, talked with breeders, learned about the breed, competitions, and commitment. This just sparked my interest. I loved the idea of being competitive, and so I jumped in with both feet. Who were your mentors in the sport? Doris Hyde of Dove Cote Bichons. Dear, sweet, patient Doris answered every question I had... and I had many. I asked her where she got her start and who her mentors were. What did showing involve? How does the point system work? What is an owner handler? What is a professional handler? Where do I go to learn how to handle? Will you help me whelp my first litter? How do you keep a Bichon’s face white? And the ultimate question.... how do you housebreak a Bichon?

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G & P L A C I N G

GCHS CH OVERO SUMMER LOVE

CH DELL-ROSS BRYNLEA BLACK HOLE BLUES X CH OVERO PINKALICIOUS AX OAJ

OWNED BY JENNIFER PORTER DELMER CO-OWNED & BRED BY JAIME BRAGG EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

Ruby

BREED * ALL BREED * #8 #3

*AKC STATS AS OF 3/31/21

THANK YOU JUDGES GROUP 2 - PEGGY BEISEL-MCILWAINE & GROUP 3 - GLORIA KERR

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PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

BIS-RBIS-BISS-GCHS CHARTEROAK TRAXX OF Grandeur

Simba # 1 # 1 # 6

Afghan Hound *

Hound *

Among All Breeds *

In 17 months of showing “Simba” has been awarded 33 Hound Group Firsts that have resulted in 14 Best in Shows and 6 Reserve Best in Shows. Pictured here with Awards from some of the strongest opinions in the Dog Sport.

Judges for Lums Pond Classic were: Mrs. MaryAnn Alston – Best in Show Mr. James Moses – Reserve Best in Show Mrs. Denise Flaim – Best of Breed & Group Second Mr. Clay Coady – Best of Breed Mr. Ken Murray – Group Frist Mrs. Terry Depietro – Best of Breed Mr. Neil McDevitt – Best of Breed & Group First

Grandeur – Evelyn and Bill Rechler, Mill Neck, NY

CHARTEROAK – Gene and Shelly Vaccaro, Oxford, CT

Exclusive Handler – Teri Tevlin

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AFGHAN HOUND

*AKC stats as of 3/31/21

BIS-RBIS-BISS-GCHS CHARTEROAK TRAXX OF Grandeur

Grandeur – Evelyn and Bill Rechler, Mill Neck, NY

CHARTEROAK – Gene and Shelly Vaccaro, Oxford, CT

Exclusive Handler – Teri Tevlin

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G C H B Z Ö L D M Á L I K O N G O

Photos by Hal Stata Stata Productions, LLC

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WIREHAIRED VIZSLA

2 0 2 0 A K C N A T I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P B E S T O F B R E E D W I N N E R M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C E M E N T S

H A N D L E D B Y : Nick Grubb & Chelsay Paul

B R E D B Y : Zsofia Miczek, Zöldmáli Kennel

O W N E D B Y : Charlene Traub

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MIMI WINKLER, JUDGES CHOICE BICHONS FRISES

Then there was Mim Barnhart, “Granny Mim” as she was called, of Miri Cal Bichons. She said to me, and I quote, “Sit your- self down in that chair, take out your pedigree, and I will not only teach you how to read this, genotype, but I will also tell you what each dog looks like, their phenotype, their strengths and their weaknesses.” And write I did, generation after generation... tall, short, good leg, no leg, level topline, good underjaw, weak under- jaw, good backskull, so-so pigment, great pigment, great tempera- ment, good coat, good tail set. She explained that doubling up on one side of said pedigree would not produce what I wanted, but doubling up on the other side had a much better chance. She painted such a vivid picture of each dog that I could visualize them. It was then that I realized if I wanted to go forward, I had to look backward. To this day I write notes about every dog in my pedigrees; their strengths, their weaknesses. One must not be ken- nel blind, though. An honest evaluation will only enhance your breeding program. The Judges Choice Bichons are widely known, highly successful and well respected. What breeding philosophies do you adhere to? First, let me thank you for saying this about my program. After listening to my mentors and learning from well-respected breeders, I decided a few months after buying my bitch to look for a foundation dog that would complement Muffy. Back to my pedi- grees, I went to look for genotype and phenotype. I was very lucky that there was a litter on the ground that had three males to choose from. One boy just pulled at my heartstrings, Cody, and to this day his profile is still the one I think of when judging dogs. Linebreed- ing was drummed into my head, so with this in mind I checked the two pedigrees and Muffy’s sire was Cody’s grandfather, a perfect foundation to start my breeding program. And as I started with linebreeding, it is still my program of choice. If I have to go out, I will only breed to a tightly linebred dog, so I know what to expect. I know those breeders care as much about their line as I do mine. At my age I don’t like surprises. And as much as we try, there are sometimes surprises anyway. How many dogs do you currently house? Tell us about your facilities and how the dogs are maintained. Facilities is an oxymoron in my case. I live in their house. I have five dogs: Ch. Judges Choice Who Knew, aka Oops. (I guess you can figure out the name.) Her daughter, Ch. Judges Choice On The Edge Of Glory, aka Gaga; her daughter, Ch. Judges Choice Good Golly, aka Molly; and my two boys, Ch. Judges Choice In Pursuit, aka Chase, father of Molly; and my new puppy just start- ing out, Judges Choice A New Twist, aka Oliver, a Molly son. Four generations of happy, healthy, linebred dogs that I am still trying to housebreak! They get groomed every three weeks and brushed every day. They share everything I have: food, bed, love… well, everything except my wine. I considered ending my breeding pro- gram, and while this will sound dramatic, I just couldn’t do it. I kept thinking, ”That really great one could be in the next litter.” Who were/are some of your most significant Bichons, both in the whelping box and in the show ring? I guess the obvious one has to be JR, Best in Show winner at Westminster. I bred his mother, his grandmother, his great grand- mother, and his grandfather. And, of course, JR goes back to Cody and Muffy, my foundation dogs. This question really made me think. Yes, I have had some very good dogs, including some males that were great in the ring and never produced what I expected. On paper, they should have, but those are the surprises and dis- appointments. I had two littermates, both champion bitches, one a multiple Group placer while the other couldn’t have cared less. Guess who was the better producer? But I digress. Who stands out

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Presented by Joanne Thibault

T AYL O R AM GCHS / CAN GCH

SEABURY’S MADE TO MEASURE, AOM BRED AND OWNED BY ROSLYN ESKIND, SEABURY (REG’D) PWDS CH Keevabay’s Fifty Shades x GCHB Seabury’s Sophie Tucker, AOM

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

MIMI WINKLER, JUDGES CHOICE BICHONS FRISES

in my mind? Ch. Judges Choice High Ridge Right On ROMX, Reno, winner of three five-point majors, all at specialties, multiple Group placer, sire of 28 champions with more on the way, the new one being my puppy. Judges Choice Diamond Jim, DJ, sire of 17 champions, multiple Group winner, Best of Winners at the BFCA National under Annie Clark, and sire of BOS at Westminster, with me handling, Ch. Judges Choice Purple Rain, daughter of Muffy and Cody, mother of Girlfriend, BOW at the BFCA National, and great-grandmother of JR. Finally, my Jenny, Ch. Dreams Came True Jennifer ROMX, dam of 12 champions, winner of Best in Sweeps at the BFCA National. The very first Bichon I imported from Brazil. Thank you, Cristine. And yes, she, too, was a line- breeding for me. She and Muffy had the same grandfather, which would be great-grandfather to Cody. Linebreeding… if it ain’t broke, why fix it? Please comment positively on your breed’s present condition and what trends might bear watching. As Judges Education Chair for the Bichon Frise Club of Amer- ica, I start my seminar by stating that the Bichon is a breed of illusion. A talented groomer can enhance any dog and make them appear more balanced. I think, today, our dogs are better balanced although I do not want to see them get more short-backed and up on leg. I also do not want to see them running the Indianapolis 500. Our standard calls for free and easy movement; a faster dog is not a better dog. Maybe it’s because of my gymnastics background, but free, easy movement, extension, and a sense of “self ” mean so much to me. Let me answer this question from another angle. I would like breeders today to establish their own breeding programs. I would like to see pedigrees that contain the same kennel name for three generations. I think, in addition to judges’ education, perhaps breeders’ education offered at a National Specialty would be so worthwhile; “old-timers” sharing their knowledge, filling in the gaps, sharing the phenotypes of dogs in the pedigrees from years ago. Going back to the beginning is a concept I like. The sport has changed greatly since you first began participating. What are your thoughts on the state of the fancy and the declining number of breeders? How do we encourage newcomers to join us and remain in the sport? Yes, it has changed so much. Years ago, you could look in the ring and know which dog came out of what kennel. You knew lines, you knew lineage, and you knew progeny. I will tell you this story to illustrate my point. A few years ago, I was sitting ringside at Westminster watching Bichon breed judging. This woman leaned over and asked me how it felt, after all these years, to have nothing of mine in the ring. I said, “You can’t be talking to me… BOB and BOS are both my grandchildren.” That lack of knowledge would have never happened years ago. She had imported her dogs; she had no mentor. She asked me what I meant, so I explained and told her to call me. I have since taught her to read and understand pedigrees. Knowledge and sharing adds another layer to our sport; it stimulates the mind. We have to encourage new people by shar- ing our love and knowledge. I would beg new breeders to pick our brains, to ask us questions; we would love to share. As they say, “Reach out and touch someone.” Tell us a little about Mimi outside of dogs… your profession, your hobbies. I am the mother of four wonderful children who have produced five delicious grandchildren. I also share my home with two birds, Malibu the Macaw and Harvey the African Grey, who has been talking (and cursing) this entire afternoon.

In addition to judging dogs, I have been a gymnastics judge since the late 1970s. I have had the honor of judging Olympians both here and in Europe. My life is full. I have always had the belief that my glass is not half empty or half full. If I am not happy, I simply get a new glass and start over. Finally, where do you see your breeding program in the next decade or two? I see the most beautiful show ring, adorned with flowers, the audience filled with notables, officiated by the best judges to have ever entered a ring. My dog, of course, will be owner-handled... and the rosette will read, “Best in Show, Pearly Gates Kennel Club.” Thank you for letting me share this with your readers.

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Flash CH RIVERSEDGE JUMPIN JACK FLASH RN JH CGC MBISS WINNER • MULTIPLE GROUP WINNER NATIONAL SPECIALTY AOM WINNER silver grand champion BEAUTIFULLY REPRESENTING THE Chesapeake Standard

THANK YOU TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED THIS CHESAPEAKE’S TYPE TO STANDARD “THE CHESAPEAKE IS A STRONG, WELL-BALANCED, POWERFULLY BUI LT ANIMAL OF MODERATE SIZE… GAIT MUST BE SMOOTH, FREE AND EFFORTLESS, GIVING THE IMPRESSION OF GREAT POWER AND STRENGTH”

BRED AND OWNED BY NANCY RICKERSON • EXPERTLY HANDLED BY ANTHONY CANTOR • LOVED BY ALL!

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RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE BAY)

Thank you judge Patricia trotter

I N T C H B I S M B I S S G C H G Pengwen’s Southernwind Trojan War Triumph C D X , R E , N A , C G C A , R O M

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

AJAX Owned by: Kay Backues , DVM 918-521-2965 Perfectly Presented by: Teresa Nail & Ray Lively

Bred By: Cecilia Martinez & Gwen Myers , DVM

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by LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Asheville Kennel Club Fletcher, North Carolina | April 10, 2021 MEMORIES CAPTURED

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MEMORIES CAPTURED BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

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FLASH May 1st, 2021 Best of Breed and Group 2 Land of Lakes Kennel Club Thank you, judge James Mitchell

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

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WEIMARANER

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MEMORIES CAPTURED BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

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*AKC STATS AS OF 3/31/21 RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE BAY)

MEMORIES CAPTURED BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

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OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATION AND GRATITUDE TO ALL THE JUDGES HE HAS WON GROUP PLACEMENTS UNDER: MS. JOANNE BUEHLER • MR. RAYMOND V. FILBURN JR. • MR. ALLEN L. ODEM • MRS. LINDA HURLEBAUS • MR. JOHN P. WADE MR. DANA P. CLINE • MR. THOMAS KIRSTEIN • MR. JAMES MITCHELL • MR DONALD A. GILL • MR. TIMOTHY CATTERSON THANK YOU JUDGE MR. DONALD A. GILL FOR THE BEST IN SHOW WIN AT NORTHWEST ARKANSAS KENNEL CLUB.

BRED & OWNED BY SARAH SWEETMAN, MICHAEL & KAREN KURTZNER •

EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY MICHAEL KURTZNER

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BEAGLE (OVER 13 IN.)

MEMORIES CAPTURED BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

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NORFOLK TERRIER

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

JOINTS WHERE BONES MEET!

First, let us do a brief review of some of the basics. ANGULATION refers to the angles created by bones meeting at various joints (articulations), especially at the shoulder (Fig. 1A) and pelvic areas (Fig. 1B) and the stifle (Fig. 1C), hock (Fig. 1D), pastern (Fig. 1E) and at the elbow (Fig. 1F). BONE comprises the structure of the skeletal system and provides lever arms for locomotion. Bone also plays important roles in maintaining mineral homeostasis (the balance of minerals, especially calcium and phosphorus). The bones must sup- ply sufficient area for the attachment of the muscles. Smooth muscles account for one-third to one-half of the total body weight.

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B I S MRB I S GCHS N I KAL UK N KOBA’ S SHAL L WE DANCE ?

B R ED BY KAR L A & S T E PHEN WAL L

E XCL U S I VE LY HAND L ED BY E LV I N I ZAGU I RR E

OUR S I NCE R E AP P R EC I AT I ON AND GRAT I T UDE TO A L L J UDGE S WHO HAVE AWARDED ANNA’ S F I NE T Y P E AND QUA L I T Y.

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SIBERIAN HUSKY

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

MUSCLES move the bones and dictate where they will go and where they will stop. The skeleton is simply bone, and has no means of creating motion by itself. Although we are concentrating on the inner structure of the skeleton and its articulations and relationship, without muscles there is no movement. The musculature of the dog is a complicated subject, too lengthy for us to approach here. We are simply going to try to understand the structural limitations imposed by the composition of the juncture of the various bones, and leave the study of the muscles of the dog up to the individual student. TENDONS connect muscle to bone and are part of the muscle structure. LIGAMENTS are NOT part of the muscle structure. They are tough, fibrous bands developed at joints to connect bones to other bones. Other lig- aments form slings to hold tendons at the shoulder, wrist, and ankle joints. CANINE JOINTS There are “joints” (as in popular “joints” where people meet up), and then there are the joints formed within the body. Basically, a joint or articulation is a point where two or more bones meet and are united by fibrous, elastic or cartilaginous tissue or a combination of these tissues. There are three main types of joints: Fibrous (immovable); Cartilaginous (partially moveable); and Synovial (freely moveable). FIBROUS JOINTS are those that are stationery, such as the joints in the skull, which allow little to no movement. The bones are held together tightly by tough, fibrous, connective tissue. (See Figure 2.) The canine skull is actually made up of over 40 different bones, all tightly held together by this fibrous tissue. These various fibrous joints, also called “sutures” (see Figure 3A) serve to allow enough movement to absorb the shock of a blow as well as allow for growth at the edges of the bone. The fibrous joints range from those where a slight degree of compressibility is advantageous to those where a more extreme stability is desirable. A fibrous joint may have a considerable amount of intervening connective tissue. (See Figure 3.) CARTILAGINOUS JOINTS allow some movement as compared to a fibrous joint, but less movement than a synovial joint. Cartilaginous joints are formed when two or more bones are joined together entirely by cartilage. The joints formed between each vertebra in the spine are cartilaginous joints, allowing a smooth, frictionless movement of the spine. (See Figure 4.) The intervertebral disc is composed of fibrocartilage, which joins two vertebrae together. The center of the disc consists of a gel-like material. Another exam- ple of cartilaginous joints are the joints where the ribs meet the sternum. SYNOVIAL JOINTS are, by far, the most common classification of a joint within the canine body. They are highly moveable and all have a synovial capsule (collagenous structure) surrounding the entire joint, a synovial membrane (the inner layer of the capsule) that secretes synovial fluid (a lubricating liquid), and cartilage known as hyaline cartilage that pads the ends of the articulating bones (fibrous tissue enclosing a synovial cavity). The joints are lubricated for smooth action by synovial fluid and are stabilized by tendons and ligaments. The joints are the hinges of the body. A well-formed joint allows bones to act as levers; the bones move at angles to each other to produce movement. Internally, they have cushion-like padding called cartilage. Externally, they are held together by flexible ligaments. There are six types of synovial joints, which are classified by the shape of the joint and the movement available. The dog’s body has three basic types of joints that we are going to discuss: • BALL AND SOCKET such as the hip and shoulder joints. • HINGED such as the knees and elbows, which move in one plane (like a door). • GLIDING or PLANE such as the wrists and ankles. • CONDYLAR such as the stifle (knee) that resembles a hinge joint in movement, but differs in structure. (For the sake of simplicity, we will consider these to be hinged joints.)

Figure 2. Canine skull with some sutures accentuated.

Figure 3. Fibrous joint sutures in skull showing connective tissue.

Figure 4. Intervertebral Disc

Figure 4a. Placement of Invertebral Discs in Spinal Column and Sternum

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/21

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SPINONE ITALIANO

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

left to right: Figure 5. Upper Arm/Shoulder Blade Joint; Figure 6. Pelvis/Femur Hip Joint; Figure 7. Elbow Joint; Figure 8. Stifle Joint

A BALL AND SOCKET JOINT moves in two directions with rotational capabilities. It is formed by a convex hemispherical head, which fits into a cavity. (See Figures 5 & 6 and Figure 9 for an x-ray of a hip joint.) A HINGED JOINT moves on one axis (like a door). It per- mits flexion and extension with a limited degree of rotation. The most moveable surface of a hinged joint is usually concave. (See Figures 7 & 8.) In the GLIDING or PLANE JOINT, the articular surfaces are nearly flat. The bones that make up the joint can glide or rotate. The pastern joint (carpus joint) of the dog is located approximately in the same position as the human wrist. (But it is NOT a wrist!) The carpal bones in this joint form two rows. (See Figure 9.) It is a syno- vial joint, comprised of a common outer fibrous capsule and three inner synovial pouches, one for each joint. Numerous ligaments add to the stability of the joint and ensure that movement is largely limited to a gliding motion and a very small amount of rotation.

(See Figure 9A.) The pastern serves as the dog’s main shock absorb- er and allows for flexibility in movement. Let me repeat myself: Pasterns absorb the impact of every step ever taken by your dog. (See Figure 9.) A CONDYLAR JOINT resembles a hinged joint in move- ment, but involves a prominence in one bone fitting into a depres- sion in the articulating bone. A good example is the stifle. (See Figures 10, 10A & 10B.) It looks much like a knuckle, and results in two articular surfaces, usually included in one articular capsule. These knuckle-shaped condyles vary in distance from one another, allowing uniaxial movement with limited rotation. After my dogs had their way with a cow bone, I saved it to photograph as it really does demonstrate how a condyle joint fits together. (Figure 11 shows the leg bone and the carpal bones sepa- rately. Figure 12 shows how well they fit together.) If you have any questions or comments, or to schedule a semi- nar, contact Stephanie via email: jimanie@welshcorgi.com .

left to right: Figure 9. Pastern (Carpus) Joint; Figure 9A. Pastern (Carpus) Joint; Figure 10. Stifle Condyles

left to right: Figure 10A. Hip Ball and Socket Joint and Condyles on Femur (Young German Shepherd Dog); Figure 10B. Condyles on Femur; Figure 11. Separated Condyle Joint; Figure 12. Condyle Joint Articulation

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*AKC BREED STATS 2020 **AKC BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 3/31/21

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ICELANDIC SHEEPDOG

LITTER SIZE AND THE SINGLETON PUPPY

BY DR. CARMEN L. BATTAGLIA

H istory and experience have demonstrated that when two or more breeders gather together, their conversation, oftentimes, centers on the number of pups born and what might have gone wrong. For years, breeders have speculated as to why some litters are larger than others. Since most breeders do not review the literature and are not trained in biology or in veterinary medicine, a review of these questions was addressed. BACKGROUND A review of how nature has addressed these topics shows us that animals adapt to their living conditions. For example, horses and cattle live in herds as herbivores and cover considerable distances each day. They tend to have a long period of gestation and pro- duce a single offspring. Their young are born among the herd as it moves slowly, because only in the middle of the great herd can they be protected. The problem is quite different for canines. They live in small communities and their young are born in a safe hideout. Because they hunt, they cannot afford a long period of gestation. The reason that carnivores usually do not have single offspring lit- ters stems from the nature of their existence. They must be con- stantly hunting to struggle for existence, and the casualties among their young are high. Severzov calculated that the morality among young wolves was 45 percent at the end of the first year, and a fur- ther 32 percent by the end of their second year, with a total loss of about 77 percent for all young wolves. If their litters consisted of only a few pups, the likelihood would diminish that the survivors could contribute to maintaining the survival of the species.

There are several ways to approach the study of litter size in dogs. One perspective is to look at what can influence the size of a litter; another is to study one-puppy litters. Goldbecker and Hart reported experiences with both. For the one-puppy litters, they suggested the use of foster mothers and treating the singleton as an orphan because they have similar problems. They believed that these pups needed siblings (or other dogs to interact with) in order to learn the rules of the dog world. To that end, it is generally accepted that, at least for canines, littermates provide valuable and necessary practice sessions. Interactions provide opportunities for using their teeth, developing eye contact, and a wide range of other canine behaviors that become useful as adults. Most of the small breeds, notably the Toys and Terriers, usually produce very small litters. This is, in part, because of their very small size, which limits their capacity to carry large litters. But in the larger breeds there are wide variations in litter size, ranging from 1 to 21 and, in some instances, they have been larger. Breed- ers have, for years, unsuccessfully tried to make improvements in litter size via breeding and selection techniques—with little suc- cess. While many traits have high heritability, litter size is not one of them. It has a low heritability (around 10-15 percent), which means that one cannot count on the genes to increase the number of pups born. What can be expected will largely be determined by the non-additive factors of dominance. For example, wither height has a heritability estimate of 40-65 percent, which is reasonably high. Therefore, it is relatively easy for the breeders of the German Shepherd Dog to produce offspring with high withers. However, when it comes to litter size, selecting parents that come from large

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