Showsight Presents The American Eskimo Dog

THE AMERICAN ESKIMO DOG

TODAY, THE TRAITS AND INSTINCTS THAT WERE DESIRED TO DEVELOP THE AMERICAN ESKIMO DOG HAVE PRODUCED A VERY INTELLIGENT, VERSATILE DOG THAT EXCELS IN AGILITY, OBEDIENCE, TRACKING, LURE COURSING, BARN HUNT, FARM DOG, THERAPY AND SERVICE DOG WORK.

Excellent sidegate! Legs are only lifted high enough to clear the ground, same distance between front legs as there is in rear, feet are meeting under the body. Head is dropped slightly to keep with forward momentum of the dog.. Even through the coat you can see that back remains level.

The breed lived in somewhat obscurity until registered with UKC just after the turn of the 20th Century. At first, the breed was just registered as “Spitz” as it was definitely a Nordic/Spitz- type dog. The name went through several changes, from Ameri- can Spitz to American Eskimo Spitz, until finally, in 1926, the name was settled to American Eskimo, denoting its Nordic heri- tage. Populations of “Eskies,” as they were nicknamed, could be found in the Midwest and Texas. Gradually, the breed could be seen in other areas. Over the years, it lived a quiet life, without anyone seeking AKC recognition. More people began to fall in love with the American Eskimo dog that was extremely intel- ligent and versatile, had outstanding beauty, and was noted for its longevity. This was also a time of the rise of the many circuses. They trained many dogs of numerous breeds and mixed-breeds to perform in various performances. The American Eskimo was trained in some circuses along with many other breeds at that time. The Eskie, however, was never “bred” to be a circus dog. It was not used any more or any less than any of the other breeds. Many of the white Spitz that were used were not purebred dogs. There were a number of “stories” of the Eskie and the Circus, but when researched, they were just that—stories. In 1969, UKC closed the stud books. The National American Eskimo Association was formed and the breed was divided into Miniatures and Standards. In 1994, the AKC recognized the American Eskimo Dog, adding “Dog” to its name. The breed was divided into three divisions; Toy, Miniature, and Standard. Today, the traits and instincts that were desired to develop the American Eskimo Dog have produced a very intelligent, versa- tile dog that excels in Agility, Obedience, Tracking, Lure Cours- ing, Barn Hunt, Farm Dog, Therapy and Service Dog work. These are just to name a few of its talents. It is hard to find something that the American Eskimo Dog cannot be taught. When judging the American Eskimo Dog, remember what the breed was originally developed for—a farm dog. The AKC Standard for the breed states that the American Eskimo Dog is “…a picture of strength, agility, alertness and beauty.” The Eskie is a Nordic/Spitz-type dog and should give you the impression of a small-to-medium-sized “Northern” breed.

This dog shows good arch of neck, balanced front and rear. It is out of coat, but quality appears good, nice headpiece, and showing snownose.

Eskies can be excellent herders.

Classic Headpiece! Correct eye, muzzle has good depth, bridge is flat, correct stop, and foreface, ears are correct size., all over, very nice head, and intelligent expression.

266 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER 2021

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