Showsight Presents The Curly-coated Retriever

OfficialStandard for the CURLY-COA TED RETRIEVER CONTINUED COURTESY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB

the body, including bald strips down the back of the legs or a triangular bald patch on the throat, should be severely penal- ized. A looser, more open curl is acceptable on the ears. Sparse, silky, fuzzy or very harsh, dry or brittle hair is a fault. Trimming-Feathering may be trimmed from the ears, belly, backs of forelegs, thighs, pasterns, hocks, and feet. On the tail, feathering should be removed. Short trimming of the coat on the ear is permitted but shearing of the body coat is unde- sirable. Color: Black or liver. Either color is correct. A prominent white patch is undesirable but a few white hairs are allowable in an otherwise good dog. Gait: The dual function of the Curly as both waterfowl retriev- er and upland game hunter demands a dog who moves with strength and power yet is quick and agile. The ground-cover- ing stride is a well-coordinated melding of grace and power, neither mincing nor lumbering. The seemingly effortless trot is efficient and balanced front to rear. When viewed from the side, the reach in front and rear is free-flowing, not stilted or hackneyed. When viewed from the front or rear, movement is true:the front legs turn neither in nor out and the rear legs do not cross. Well-developed, muscular thighs and strong hocks do their full share of work, contributing to rear thrust and drive. The extension in front is strong and smooth and in bal- ance with rear action. Balance in structure translates to bal-

ance in movement and is of great importance to ensure sound- ness and endurance;extremes of angulation and gait are not desirable. Temperament: Self-confident, steadfast and proud, this active, intelligent dog is a charming and gentle family companion and a determined, durable hunter. The Curly is alert, biddable and responsive to family and friends, whether at home or in the field. Of independent nature and discerning intelligence, a Curly sometimes appears aloof or self-willed, and, as such, is often less demonstrative, particularly toward strangers, than the other retriever breeds. The Curly’s independence and poise should not be confused with shyness or a lack of will- ingness to please. In the show ring, a correctly-tempered Curly will steadily stand his ground, submit easily to examina- tion, and might or might not wag his tail when doing so. In the field, the Curly is eager, persistent and inherently coura- geous. At home, he is calm and affectionate. Shyness is a fault and any dog who shies away from show ring examination should be penalized. Minor allowances can be made for pup- pies who misbehave in the show ring due to overexuberance or lack of training or experience.

Approved October 12, 1993 Effective November 30, 1993

C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 276

should have a crisp feel when touched and hug the body like a good jacket. Pressing lightly on the body coat, the small coat curls should have resilience, spring right back to former position. There should be sufficient density, as in hairs per square inch that provide the necessary protection. All of our breed specimens have white skin and the ability to see that white skin is never a good sign. These crisp curls are tightly wound and small which also aids in the feel of the coat, providing additional texture when felt by the judge. Looser, more open coats, and big curls are often soft to the touch and do not provide much protection in hunting environments. Coats that feel like an Irish Water Span- iel, American Water Spaniel or look like a Chesapeake Bay Retriever are all very incorrect for the Curly-Coated Retriev- er. Sheep-like or wooly coats, overly long coats, big curls, soft to the touch, poor coverage on the body or tail are all indicators of poor coat. Though a fully coated tail is part of the standard, we do have some young dogs who will exhibit a lack of hair on the tail scent gland until they reach maturity at 2-3 years

of age. However, a patch of uncurled hair behind the withers or bald patches anywhere on the body, including bald strips down the back of the legs or a triangular bald patch on the throat, should be severely penalized. (colored markers are sometimes used to miti- gate the appearance of the white skin). These bald strips and patches are the most heavily penalized items in our breed standard. Enhancement products and wet coats often ruin the texture and feel of the coats and can be used to mask the actual texture of the coat. Always remember that the distinctive coat is the hallmark of this breed and should be a high priority when judging the breed. Self-confident, steadfast and proud, this active, intelligent dog is a marvel- ous family companion, durable hunt- er, and adaptable to many different human activities. Though a charming and gentle family companion, bid- dable and responsive to family and friends, the Curly-Coated Retriever is often less demonstrative, particularly toward strangers, than other retriever breeds. Hence when judging the breed, a correctly-tempered Curly will steadily

stand his ground, submit easily to exam- ination, and might or might not wag his tail when doing so. They often appear somewhat “bored” or “not engaged” by the concept of a judge examina- tion. However, shyness is a fault and any breed specimen who shies away from show ring examination should be penalized. Minor allowances can be made for puppies who misbehave in the show ring due to over-exuber- ance or lack of training or experience. Any signs of aggression toward people or other dogs should be grounds for immediate excusal. Due to the breed’s loyal nature and the status of Curly-Coated Retrievers as a low entry breed, owners often show their own dogs. And the owner expe- rience levels in the show ring vary greatly, so judges should be prepared to have some patience to allow for a few glitches in presentation of the dogs which will be appreciated by the exhib- itors. As dog shows are a beauty con- test, all Curly-Coated Retrievers should be shown in a tidy, clean condition. The Curly-Coated Retriever is a won- derful breed that can be a rewarding judging experience.

278 • S HOW S IGHT M AGAZINE , S EPTEMBER 2017

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