Top Notch Toys, August 2021

# 1 Group winning Multiple group placing with limited showing THANK YOU TO JUDGES MICHAEL CANALIZO, SHARON MASNICK, AND DANA PLONKEY who honored Indy with these fantastic wins! We are thrilled to hold this honor! HANDLER: DARON NEWCOMB OWNERS: DIANA SUMMERS & MARY KEELING *AKC STATS AS OF 7/31/2021

YORKSHIRE TERRIER BREED *

BREEDERS: MARKUS & BEATE ACKERMAN

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Indy NATIONAL WINNER 2020 AND 2021

MBISS GCHB CAMPARIS COASTWIND

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Zen GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen

#2 GRAND CHAMPION SYSTEM *

#2 BREED SYSTEM *

#4 ALL-BREED SYSTEM *

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

*AKC STATS AS OF 6/30/2021

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Thank you Judge Mrs. Evalyn Gregory FOR MAKING THIS WONDERFUL WESTMINSTER MEMORY.

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MBIS MBISS TH. PH. EW 19’ AM GCHB CH Tokie Trend Factor

THANK YOU TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED OUR BAD BOY!

© JORDAN ISOM

OWNED BY PETER & SUSAN COLCORD BRED BY CHAIWAT TANGKARAVAKUN SHOWN BY PETER COLCORD

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Everyone loves a

Badboy

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Thank you Judges

Rita Holloway

Robert Hutton

Jon Steele

Steve Hayden

Carolyn Herbel

Richard Powell

Peggy Beisel-McIlwaine

Ken Murray

Dr. John Ioia

Robyn Stansell

BRED OWNED AND HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

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GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

# 1 MALTESE ALL BREED *

AMERICA’S #1 MALTESE BAGS 10 MORE GROUP ONES IN THE MONTH OF JULY!

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW WINNER MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/21 PHOTO BY © HOLLOWAY

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Thank you judge

“Beautiful exhibit with a compact body and good spring of rib. Pretty face with kind expression and large round eyes with a well- cushioned muzzle. Excellent movement both coming and going. This gal has so many good things going for her!” Dr. Margaret Reed

GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera Owned by Michele True, Co-owned with Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier Bred by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier candid photography by©SueBee Photography

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GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera

Our sincerest appreciation and gratitude to Judge Mrs. Evalyn Gregory for including Bliss in the cut at Westminster Kennel Club. Congratulations to Best of Breed Winners and Westminster Kennel Club for putting on an extraordinary event. FLASH SARASOTAKENNEL CLUB 6/16/2021 JUDGE: Mrs. Barbara Dempsey Alderman OS/BOBOH JUDGE: Mr. Gary L. Andersen SEL/BOBOH

GREATER VENICE FLORIDA DOG CLUB INC (2) 6/18/2021 JUDGE: Michael Canalizo BOBOH MID-FLORIDA CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL 6/19/2021 SWEEPSTAKES JUDGE: Gwendolyn Wells SEL/BOBOH

Is Making A Big Splash

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ON THE COVER

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BROOKVIEW B R O O K V I E W ’ S H O M E T O W N Y U B I L E E

M S . T R I C I A S T A C Y, M R . G E O R G E M I L U T I N OV I C H , D R . C L Y D E E . S H AW A N D M R S . D E B B I E C A M P B E L L - F R E E M A N F O R T H E S E E XC I T I N G W I N S ! T H A N K YO U J U D G E S (CLOCKWISE)

A L W A Y S B R E E D E R - O W N E R H A N D L E D B Y : Matina E. Johnson

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YORKSHIRE TERRIERS

Yubi 11 POINTS INCLUDING 1

MAJOR AND 1 BEST OF OPP WIN OVER A SPECIAL AT 9 MONTHS OF AGE! THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. ANGELA PICKETT FOR THIS EXCITING WIN!

B R O O K V I E W Y O R K I E S E A R N T H E I R C H A M P I O N S H I P S F R O M T H E B R E D B Y C L A S S & A R E E X C L U S I V E L Y B R E E D E R - O W N E R H A N D L E D B Y

Matina E. Johnson T H R O U G H O U T T H E I R C A R E E R S .

B R O O K V I E W Y O R K S H I R E T E R R I E R S WWW . B R O O K V I E W YO R K I E S . C OM A KC B R E E D E R O F M E R I T | Y T C A T O P B R E E D E R 2 017 B KC B R E E D E R O F T H E Y E A R 2 017 | A KC S P O R T S M A N O F T H E Y E A R 2 018 & 2 019

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CONTENTS TABLE OF

TNT

20

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO & Publisher aj@aramediagroup.com Office 512-686-3466 ext. 102 Cell 512-541-8128 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President hanifa@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 104 Cell 512-541-8687 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer michael@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 101 ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT Chief Marketing Officer, Head Of Digital Brands alex@aramediagroup.com 1-908-288-7733 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagroup.com 512-686-3466 ext. 103 DANIEL CARTIER Director, Social Media & Web Site daniel@aramediagroup.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR/EDITOR BONNIE GUGGENHEIM Advertising Director/Editor bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512-971-3280 SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIC Manager, Social Media & Creative Content elma@aramediagroup.com 1-512-686-3466

22

24

30

20 Toy Talk 22 Toy Box

38 40 43 46

Judging the Chinese Crested Shelley Hennessy

Bonnie Guggenheim

Mystery From Japan Five Things You Never Knew About the Japanese Chin Scott Toney

Scott Toney, Shea O’Connell, Holly Maxwell

24 Candids: Duluth, MN Tom Weigand 26 Maintaining and Improving Breeds Jerold S. Bell, DVM 30 An Interview With

Candids: Maltese National Specialty Lisa Caudill

What Makes a Pug, a Pug? Patt Kolesar Stoltz. JEC PDCA

MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 18567 TAMPA, FL 33679

Carol Harris (Bo-Bett Farms) Bonnie Guggenheim

TOP NOTCH TOYS is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. PO Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. Postage paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publica- tion may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opinions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute en- dorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submitted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $75.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. In- quiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, AraMedia Group Inc., PO Box 18567, Tampa FL 33678512 686 3466 ext 105 or michael@aramediagroup.com.

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A Special SPECIALTY WEEK! Dylan

CH COACHLIGHT AFF-TER BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND SELECT AT OKLAHOMA CITY KC, WEDNESDAY THANK YOU DR. RENE ECHEVARRIA-COFINO SELECT AT MID-DEL-TINKER KC ACA SUPPORTED ENTRY THANK YOU MR. JOHN P. WADE

Scarlett COACHLIGHT N HIGH NOON’S FIDDLE-DEE-DEE RWB AT LAWTON DFA, AFFENPINSCHER CLUB OF AMERICA NATIONAL SPECIALTY THANK YOU MS. DANI ROSENBERRY

EXPERTLY SHOWN BY SERGIO OLIVERA BRED BY SHEILA WYMORE SCARLETT CO-OWNED WITH LISA CARPENTER

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TOY TALK ETCETERA by Bonnie Guggenheim, TNT Advertising Director & Associate Editor

CLASS DOGS • BRED BY • SPECIALS • VETERANS REACH FOR THE STARS!

H ow wonderful to see dog shows back in full force, with Toy Shows, Large Circuits, and lots and lots of Special- ties for every breed, large and small. Someone emailed me stating that they felt Top Notch Toys was a Toy magazine for Specials only! WRONG!! We are a magazine for all Toys, All the Time, with every breed in Group Five featured, usually once every year. Here we are, half way through the year, and rankings are more important than ever, with National Special- ties an important event for Toy Fox Terriers and Ital- ian Greyhounds, and upcoming National Specialties for Japanese Chin, Pugs, and Chihuahuas as well as the super exciting Morris and Essex show with many associated Specialties. TNT is the perfect place to advertise your winning class dogs, including puppy winners, veterans, and the all-important Breed wins, plus, Group Placements for New Champions of Record and Top-Ranked dogs. If it’s a Toy, it should be a part of TNT where the Toys are pure dynamite and you will never be lost in many pages of ads. (Obviously, you may also want to advertise your big wins in an all-breed magazine such as our sister publication, SHOWSIGHT. ) I’m here to help you make your winning Toy super important!

Many of you have asked about finding a backer, but as a rule, financial backers are interested in proven, top-winning dogs or those with the potential to become a big winner on a national and/or international level. Looking at sponsors of Top-Winning Specials, it seems that many of them have strong connections with professional handlers or owners who have had great success with dogs they’ve bred, owned or simply discovered by watching them in the ring. Every dog person loves seeing a fabulous entry going around the ring, and on occasion, a backer wants to be a part of making that particular dog number one—and they en- joy looking at a beautifully put together animal. Your dog needs to be out and winning where potential backers will see it, where they can evaluate the potential, see the temperament, and many other factors that go into a big winner. Few sponsors are seen inwin photos—they go to shows to relax, have fun, and visit with friends. Maybe they will find your dog? I hope you win lots and place your ads in Top Notch Toys Magazine ; we are National, the only ALL Toy magazine, both in print and online. Please give us an opportunity to create a stunning andmem- orable ad that will promote your dog to the right people. Let me know about your exciting wins, wonderful upcoming winners, and remember: InquiringMindsWant to Know!

Bonnie bonnie@aramediagroup.com 512.971.3280

Submitted by Scott Toney

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50

of Friendship and Shih Tzu

& MANY WONDERFUL WINS

TU CHU • Kathy Kwait

MARJA • Mark & Jacqueline Stempel

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TOP NOTCH TOYS

TOYBOX

Submitted by Shea O’Connell & Holly Maxwell

Submitted by Scott Toney

SUBMIT YOUR CUTE PHOTOS TO OUR TOYBOX DEPARTMENT. Any clear photo will do—black & white or color, regular photo or digital. (If sending digital images, send high resolution 300 DPI for best quality.) Please submit your name and the name of the dog.

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C I N G

# 4 # 4 B I S S G R C H S S E T T E ’ S T O T H E M O O N A N D B A C K AT O N E L O V E BREED * ALL BREED *

owned by TINA BREGMAN bred by GRACE SETTE BEAUTY, TYPE, MOVEMENT, TEMPERAMENT—ALL IN A SMALL PACKAGE Shown Exclusively by DAVIDWELSH

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DULUTH KENNEL CLUB

Duluth, Minnesota . July 15-18, 2021 photos by Tom Weigand

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DULUTH KENNEL CLUB

Duluth, Minnesota . July 15-18, 2021 photos by Tom Weigand

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MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING BREEDS by Jerold S. Bell, DVM, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University

I n order to understand how to main- tain breeds, we have to understand the genetic forces that shape them. Natural species evolve through natural selection. Any genetic chang- es within a population that improve the chance of survival and ability to reproduce in the populated environ- ment will be at an advantage and will thrive. This results in a loss of genetic diversity through the disadvantaged. This loss is not detrimental to the population as it is directly related to increasing its superiority. Dog breeds develop through artificial selection for desired phenotypes— what you can see in the dogs. These can include conformation, behav- ior, working ability and health. Most breeds originally started from either a small population of related founders or as a population of unrelated dogs that conformed to a working or conforma- tional phenotype. Some breed lines will be discarded over time due to ge- netic defects or an inability to adhere to a standard. Regardless of the breed origin, generations of reproduction within a small population produce ho- mozygosity (the fixation of gene pairs) through close breeding. This is what causes breeds to reproduce them- selves with each generation. Genetic studies of dog breeds show that they lose on average 35% of their genetic diversity through breed formation. Genetic studies also document the increased homozygos- ity found in dog breeds. Low effective population size (lownumber of found- ers) and high deep-pedigree inbreed- ing coefficients (homozygosity) are a natural and expected consequence of breed development. Breeds differ from natural popula- tions in that only a small percentage

of dogs reproduce to create the next generation. In a population sense, this represents a genetic bottleneck with each generation. Individuals chosen for breeding should represent the quality traits of the breed. Quality traits should not be lost through the absence of selection or the abandon- ment of quality lines. Population expansion is an important aspect of breed maintenance. If the offspring of small population breeds are generally healthy their population can growand expand. They are at stag- es of breed development where more populous breeds were earlier in their development. Breeders of small pop- ulation breeds need to mentor their puppy buyers to expand their breeder base as well as the number of dogs. Population expansion allows the cre- ation of new “family lines.” A larger population allows the average related- ness of breeding pairs (based on recent generations) to be less than the prior generation. Population contraction is detrimental to breedmaintenance due to the loss of quality breeding lines and genetic diversity. Healthy breed gene pools require expanding or large and stable populations. There are times when a lot of breeding is going on and registrations are in- creasing, and times (such as the recent past) when less breeding is going on. However, it is the offspring that repro- duce (regardless if fromprolific or lim- ited-breeding parents) that contribute their genes to the next generation. Breeding quality dogs from different “lines” and areas of the gene pool pre- vents the loss of genetic diversity. The popular sire syndrome is the sin- gle most influential factor in restrict- ing breed gene pool diversity. When a breed is concentratingona specific sire

or multi-generational sire line, other quality male lines are abandoned. This causes a loss of genetic diversity to the breed gene pool in exchange for a rapidly increasing influence of the popular sire. Now is an important time touse frozen semen of quality dogs from the past to expand gene pools. Stored DNA (such as from the OFA CHIC repository) or semen can be used for breed-specific genetic testing that might not have been previously available. All individuals carry somedeleterious genes, which can increase in frequen- cy with natural as well as artificial selection. More “lines” of naturally occurring species have died off due to genetic disorders or diminished fit- ness than those that have survived. As individuals propagate, deleterious mutations can become breed-related disease if they are disseminated and increase in frequency. Studies show that some breeds have more issues of specific genetic dis- eases with linebreeding, and others do not. This depends on the genetic load of deleterious recessive genes in the gene pool. The genetic health of dog breeds is not a direct function of homozygosity, genetic diversity, or population size; but of the accumula- tion and propagation of specific dis- ease liability genes. Artificial selection tomaintainbreeds requires active selection against del- eterious genes. This is easier with dominant or additive genes, as the genotype is observed in the dog’s phenotype. For recessive deleterious genes, selection involves the devel- opment and use of genetic tests that reveal the carrier state, or the identi- fication of lines with carrier risk. Some hereditary disorders and dis-

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1. Quality carriers of testable disease-causing recessive genes should be bred to normal testing mates and replaced for breeding with quality, normal testing offspring. 2. Quality dogs with a less desirable phenotype (such as fair or even mild hip dysplasia in breeds with high frequencies of dysplasia) should be bred to dogs with desir- ablephenotypes (goodor excellent hips) and replaced for breeding with offspring whose phenotype is better than the parent. 3. Quality non-affected dogs from lines expressing disorders that do not have genetic tests (such as epilepsy) should be bred to mates from families or litters not expressing the disorder and re- placed for breeding with a qual- ity, healthy offspring. In small population breeds with high frequencies of genetic disorders, breeders are often “frozen” from breeding for fear of producing disease. This causes continued breed decline due to population contraction. Breed improvement requires selection of the best breeding choices in matings that can reduce the frequency of ge- netic disease. As the population and breeding choices expand, the abil- ity to reduce the frequency of disease expands with it. Breed improvement involves: 1. Selection of Breeding Dogs; 2. Appropriate Pairing of Mates; 3. Breeding; 4. Replacement of Less Desirable Breeding Dogs with More Desirable Offspring. An unfortunate development in dog breeding are recommendations de- signed for the preservation of rare and endangered species. These involve outbreeding (reducing homozygosity and average inbreeding coefficients) and increasing minor gene or chro- mosome segment frequencies. Dog breeding requires diverse lines, and not a homogenized and randomized outbred population. Outbreeding will not reduce the frequency of breed- related genetic disease, as the caus-

ative genes are already dispersed in the breed gene pool. Genetic selection for quality and against undesirable traits is what causes homozygosity and reduces the frequency of minor genes and chromosomal segments. Blindly selecting for them without knowing their effect could signifi- cantly reverse selection-based breed improvement. Homozygosity is syn- onymous with pure breeds. It is not inherently correlated to impaired genetic health and does not have to be artificially controlled. Expanding populations with different breeders undertaking different types of matings and selecting on different lines, while monitoring and selecting against genetic disease provides for a healthy, diverse breed gene pool. Official genetic screening results should be made available to pro- spective breeders, and to the pet and breeding-stock purchasing public. This is facilitated through open ge- netic health databases like the OFA. It doesn’t matter whether a breeder is a large commercial breeder, or only breeds once. It is no longer acceptable to say that genetic disease “just hap- pens.” In today’s environment, not testing for documented breed-related hereditary diseases is irresponsible and unethical breeding. Breed-spe- cific pre-breeding health screening should become as universal as equine pre-purchase examinations. Maintenance and improvement of a breed requires: 1. A Large or Expanding Breed Population; 2. Avoidance of the Popular Sire Syndrome; 3. Avoidance of Extreme Pheno- types that Can Produce Disease Liability; 4. Monitoring of Health Issues in the Breed; 5. Constant Selection for Quality and Health. (This article was published in the Sep- tember 2016 Perspectives—AKC Dele- gates Newsletter. It can be reproduced with the permission of the author.)

ease-predisposing phenotypes have been actively selected for by breed- ers. The most evident and widespread is the brachycephalic obstructive airway disorder, seen in extremely short-muzzled breeds. Other extreme phenotypes include excessive skin, excessive skin folds, excessive hind limb angulation, excessive size, ex- cessive coat, dome-shaped skulls, and eyelid abnormalities. It is important that breed standards and selection practices specifically avoid selection for extreme phenotypes that cause disease liability. For the show ring, judges education should be directed towards rewarding moderation of disease-related extreme phenotypes. Regular breed health surveys should be conducted by breed clubs to moni- tor for the presence and changing prevalence of genetic disorders. The OFA offers on-line health surveys for breeds. Breed genetic health should be judged on breed health surveys that document the occurrence of genetic disease. Parent breed clubs should deter- mine realistic pre-breeding genetic screening requirements based on the prevalence and severity of testable disorders in the breed. Health test- ing requirements should be listed in the OFA CHIC and AKC Bred with H.E.A.R.T. programwebsites. Without direct selection against ge- netic disorders, the genetic health of breeds will decline. Breeders who refuse to do pre-breeding health screening should be directed to find a different hobby or profession that they can actually be good at. It is not ethical to breed dogs without selec- tion for genetic health. Selection of healthy breeding stock is themost im- portant aspect of maintaining breeds. Each breeder must prioritize their se- lection for positive traits and against disease traits with each mating. Some breeders feel that genetic screen- ing will reduce the genetic diversity of breeds. The proper use of genetic screening actually increases breeding choices by allowing quality dogs at higher-risk of carrying disease liabil- ity genes to be bred:

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OWNER: JAMIE BAISDEN / CAMILLE LASHLEY HANDLER: MAT THEW HOAGLUND BREEDER: CAMILLE LASHLEY

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Carol and pups. (Taking puppy pictures is always interesting... the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat.)

AN INTERVIEW WITH CAROL HARRIS (BO-BETT FARMS)

by Bonnie Guggenheim

C arol Harris of the Ocala, Florida, area passed away on August 7, 2021 at age 98. She was amaz- ing to work with while creating the following article, and an incredible woman of Quarter Horse fame as well as Whippets and Italian Greyhounds. The Bo-Bett farm was such a beauti- ful place—and Carol’s favorite place to be. Our sympathy to her children and friends in the dog and horse fancy; she will be missed by all of us. This article previously appeared in TNT and is being reprinted to honor Ms. Harris’ memory. Carol Harris, breeder of 500 cham- pions and the matriarch of Bo-Bett Farms, became charmed with dogs when she was given a Collie at age ten. Her interest continued after much success in Quarter Horses, German Shepherds, Dobermans, Dalmatians, and Whippets. Her in- terest in Italian Greyhounds was a result of her love of Whippets, and gave her the knowledge to see struc- ture and understand function as well as utilize strong points in pedigrees. Carol was voted by her peers in 2009, (and a second time in 2012) as “Out- standing Breeder of the Year”—an honor achieved by few. It’s interest- ing that she says, “The harder I work, the luckier I get.” It was her attitude and acquired knowledge that positioned Carol to purchase Tekoneva’s Dario in 1990. “Dario” became the breed’s all-time top-producing sire with 108 champi- ons to his name. He was purchased

“Dario”

One of Carol’s favorite photos; “Dario” is pictured with two judges who liked him enough to give him the Group and then BIS—Vera Bistrim and Mrs. Denny Canino, respectively.

“Ruby” and “Dario” produced 22 Champion pups together.

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“Barbara Ann”

“Opie”

“Barbara Ann”

“Barbara Ann”

sight unseen and was campaigned to 9 Bests in Show, 3 Best in Spe- cialty wins and 59 Group Firsts. This Italian Greyhound is felt by many to have changed and im- proved the breed more than any male sire could have ever accom- plished. Next, Carol searched for a founda- tion bitch, and acquired Ch. Win- drider Ruby Tuesday, “Ruby.” She was bred to Dario and together they produced 22 champions. After their fifth and final litter, they decided to renew their wedding vows. Six of their offspring were in attendance that day; some went on to become champions. Ruby is the breed’s top- producing dam. Carol also owned a male, Ch. Bo- Bett Perry Peridot, who sired 32 champions. One of his sons, Ch. Bo-

Bett’s Bachelor Buttons, “Batch,” won the Italian Greyhound Club of America’s Top Producer in 2009— with 16 champion get. He sired Plat- inum GCh. Bo-Bett’s Open Button, “Opie,” a multiple Best in Show winner and the #1 IG in both 2010 and 2011. Batch also sired Ch. Bo-Bett’s Red Buttons. “Red” became the #2 dog in South Africa in 2007, and was sold to a prominent IG breeder in South Africa. He remains South Af- rica’s top-winning IG of all time—no IG in South Africa has even come close. His record includes Top Toy for 2008 with 32 Toy Group Firsts, 14 Toy Group Placements, 2 Reserve Best in Show All-Breeds, and 5 Best in Show All-Breeds. Red was han- dled by his owner, but more often by Ian Allison in Johannesburg, and he

“Red”

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“Barbara Ann”

“Opie”

“Dario”

“Dario” in the office at Bo Bo H, sitting in Rugged Lark’s 1987 Super Horse trophy.

“Dario” in 1993 with Judge Mrs. M. Fairwethers.

“Dario” with two sons: Left to right: Ch. BoBett’s Tommy Topaz, “Dario” & BISS Ch. BoBett’s Peter Platinum.

is still siring beautiful puppies. Carol’s current success is the #1 IG and #8 Toy dog, GCh. March- wind Barbara Ann, bred by March- wind Kennels and handled by Justin Smithey. Carol feels conformation and mental stability are very important, as well as knowing what works in terms of pedigrees (why it worked—or not) and keeping very specific notes. Pho-

“Dario” in 1993; winning one of many national specialties. Handled by Davin McAteer.

“Dario”

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B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N S E K H A R A ’ S L E T ’ S G E T R E A D Y T O R O YA L

B R E E D E R L A R A S I VA H I L L OWN E R A R L E N E B U T T E R K L E E A N D L A R A S I VA H I L L H A N D L E R A M A N D A R O O P

D I V I N E ’ S AT O M I C B O M B @ G I N G E R Y

B R E E D E R A M A N D A R O O P A N D A R L E N E B U T T E R K L E E OWN E R / H A N D L E R A M A N D A R O O P

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tographs should be included with all records because “pictures don’t lie.” She has inbred, outcrossed, and line- bred, but feels her success comes from knowing why and how she ac- complished what she was seeking in a particular breeding. Carol has not done very much importing and feels the European IGs are differ- ent from the those we see here in the United States. The IG puppies are whelped and raised in the bedroom to allow con- stant observation and socializing

Another “Ruby” litter: Left to right: Ch. Amy Amethyst, Timmy Tanzanite, Ch. Precious Pearl, Ch. Jamie Jade and Tiny Turquoise.

Carol’s dogs are hand fed to learn patience and manners, and how to show better.

Carol’s friend, Barbara Angelio, holding “Red” on the left and Barbara’s Champion, Penny Perridot, on the right.

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Perky Peridot winning IG National Specialty in 1999 under Judge Jimmie Mitchell.

“Red”

Carol with three young Whippets that would become champions: Left to right: Casha, Multi BIS Quick Pick and Treasure.

“Barbara Ann”

at the earliest age. Carol feels that handling by many different people at all ages prevents shyness and makes them a much better show dog or pet. She is a proponent of hand feed- ing, and does so as a way of train- ing because it allows for correction and ensures better temperaments,

appetites, better attention span, and success in the show ring. They also learn goodmanners and patience. She also says, this way she has practically no pans to wash… just her hands. She very much enjoys the hand feeding. Carol is able to determine personality types and suitability for shows or pet

homes in the hand feeding and grow- ing up process. Show prospects are determined be- tween 12 and 14 weeks, with pets be- ing carefully sold to selected families with whomCarol stays in contact. Some of her show potential puppies go to Junior Handlers, as this is an

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An all-champion litter by “Dario” and “Ruby.”

important part of Carol’s philosophy. It brings interested young people into our sport and offers an opportunity to succeed in the show ring with a qual- ity puppy. Some could become profes- sional handlers in time while others learn confidence, handling skills, and can qualify for scholarship oppor- tunities as Junior Handlers. Love of dogs is essential! Carol owes success to her early expe- rience as a judge of Quarter Horses— her homebred stallion, Rugged Lark, won the Super Horse award at the American Quarter Horse Association World Show in 1985 and 1987. Lark sired two Super Horses, The Lark As- cending and Look Who’s Larkin—the only stallion to do so. Carol Harris, a woman who has ac- complished so much—successful breeder of many champion dogs in several breeds, horse judge, dog judge, successful horse breeder—is still a worthy opponent in the show ring with her Italian Greyhounds andWhippets.

One of Carol’s favorite “Dario” sons, Ch BoBett’s Peter Platinum. He also won a National IG Specialty in 1996 like his sire and brother did.

Ch. BoBett’s Speed Bump now lives with Champion Jr. Handler, Carly McNellie, in Medina, Ohio.

“Batch” pictured at 6 months. He was an excellent show dog and sire for BoBett.

Rio 8

Note from the Author: It was a pleasure to spend time interviewing Carol. My personal thank you to her for her knowledge, the time spent, and the wonderful photos she provided for this interview and article.

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D A R - R I C H @ A L L S T A R E T S E N D A L L B E A L L

3 P O I N T M A J O R 1 S T T I M E I N T H E R I N G ! !

A L L S T A R T O Y F O X T E R R I E R S I S E X C I T E D A B O U T his bright future!!

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JUDGING THE CHINESE CRESTED

By Shelley Hennessy

T he Chinese Crested is a unique breed that comes in two distinct varieties; the Hairless and the Powderpuff. When judging the breed, judges should remember that both varieties are judged by the identi- cal standard except for differences in teeth and coat, which Iwill cover later. Please do not forgive or ignore faults in one variety that you would not in the other. Both varieties should be given equal consideration. Please do not put an inferior Hairless dog up over a better Powderpuff. Unfortunately, Powder- puffs do not seem to get the recogni- tion in the Breed and Group judging that the Hairless dogs do. So many Toy dogs in the Group are heav- ily coated, and the Hairless Crested stands out more than the Powder- puff does. Please do not overlook either variety! The Chinese Crested may be free- baited or stacked in the ring. There is no preference for either presentation. Judges who insist on handlers free- baiting their dogs are not being fair to the handler or dog. And please move the dog around the ring before putting it up on the table, even if it is a single class entry. This shakes the kinks out of the dog (and handler), and on a cold morning or in a cold building it warms the Hairless up a bit, so that it doesn’t shake as much on the table. Our current AKC standard is what we must judge by. There is an alarming tendency for people to misquote the standard in ads and articles, or leave out words that change the meaning

HEADS Heads vary greatly in the breed, ranging from a more Chihuahua- type head with a shorter muzzle to a more Poodle-type head. Some- where in the middle is correct. The muzzle and skull are balanced, and the head is wedge-shaped. Eyes should be almond-shaped, and this is a problem in the breed. There are many round eyes and small eyes. Be sure, when examin- ing the dog, that you check under the crest for correct eye shape. Eye color varies. Dark-colored dogs have dark-colored eyes, and light- er-colored dogs MAY have lighter- colored eyes. Remember, the “may” when you find white or cream dogs with black eyes. Some light-colored Hairless dogs have very pale eyes. Blue eyes are not specifically men- tioned in our standard, and you will find them on occasion. This may be addressed in a future standard, but for now, as a judge, you will have to consider them in terms of the other merits of the dog. Ears should be large. Small ears are a problem in the breed, and when set too high on the head, they change the expression of the breed. The hair on the ears may be trimmed (shaved) in either variety, and heavy furnishings on the ears may cause them to look as if they are not erect. Nose color also varies with the color of the dogs; while dark dogs should have dark noses, lighter-col- ored dogs MAY have lighter noses.

of the standard. It is always a good idea to review the standard before a judging assignment. The Chinese Crested varieties are iden- tical in outward appearance—except for coat. The breed should be fine-boned, elegant, and graceful. It is one of the big- ger Toy breeds; 11-13” tall. You will find smaller and bigger ones. The standard states that “slightly” larger or smaller dogs may be given full consideration. As a judge, you will have to determine what your interpretation of “slightly” is. Keep in mind that extremely small dogs will probably not have the correct move- ment, and extremely large dogs will probably lack good breed type. How- ever, please do not judge on the principle of “the smaller, the better.” A larger, heavier dog with a level topline, good structure, and good movement should beat a smaller dog that hackneys or has a bad topline. A RECTANGULAR BREED Many people seem to have a problem with interpreting the wording of the standard. It states: “Rectangular… Body length fromwithers to base of tail is slight- ly longer than the height at the withers.” Besides the fact that the word “rectan- gular” is specifically stated in the stan- dard, reading and understanding the next sentence will make it even clearer. When you say that the body length is “slightly longer” from the withers to the base of tail, this means that the length is even longer from the front of the chest to the base of the tail. It is not off-square, it is rectangular. This body type allows for the reach and drive of the correctly moving Chinese Crested.

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TEETH This is one of the twomajor differenc- es between the varieties. While the Powderpuff must have full dentition, the Hairless is not to be faulted for missing teeth. While not mentioned in the standard, many Hairless dogs’ teeth may “tusk,” meaning that the teeth, both upper and lower, incline slightly forward (rather than straight up and down) while still retaining a scissors or level bite. Undershot bites are a problem in the breed and, while not specifically mentioned as a fault, will weigh in your final decisions. TOPLINE The Chinese Crested topline is often hard to judge. A cold and or nervous Hairless will make himself look ter- rible, and the coat on a Powderpuff will often destroy its topline on the move. The Powderpuff may be shown with its coat evenly parted down the middle or casually tousled; either is correct. Check toplines carefully on the table. A Hairless may be carefully stacked to give the appearance of a level topline, but movement will show the true picture. On the other hand, the Powderpuff may have a great topline, but the hair on its rear will “puff up” when moving and will make it look high in the rear—when it isn’t. Check toplines carefully. They are a major problem in the breed. TAILS & FEET The Chinese Crested standard does not call for a “gay” tail! It states that the tail is “carried gaily,” which is a big difference. It also says that the tail “ may be carried slightly forward over the back, ” not that it has to! See what omitting or changing words does to interpreting a standard? The original American standard and the standards of some other organi- zations call for a tail that is carried “ up or out ” in motion. Since most Cresteds don’t read, they still carry their tails that way. I still remember a judge withholding ribbons from three beautiful puppies at a show several years ago when they did not have their tails up in the air, but rath- er out behind them while moving.

This still is a tail carried “gaily” and should not be faulted. The tail does not have to go over the back, and if it does, it is only carried “slightly” for- ward over the back. It should not curl over and touch the back. Handlers that push the tail over on the back while stacking the dog (more often done with Powderpuffs) are doing a real disservice to the breed, and are ruining the rectangular look of the breed. The Crested used to be shown with the tail curled around the left hock; many handlers still do this, and it is a presentation that is unique to our breed. The feet on a Crested should be nar- row; a true “hare” foot, with elongated toes. Many Crested use their feet to actually pick up small objects. COAT Here is the only other difference be- tween the two varieties. The Hair- less ranges from what many call a “true” Hairless, with very little crest, socks or tail plume, to dogs dripping with furnishings. With that extreme amount of furnishings often comes body hair, which is removed for the show ring. A judge is not there to try to determine whether a dog has had hair removed or not; most have, to some extent. Judge the dog on the quality of the skin, which should be soft and smooth. There are some handlers who let the hair on the neck grow down over the withers. This goes against the standard, which states that the hair on the crest tapers off between the base of the skull and the back of the neck. While the hair may flow over the withers, the actual growth should not start there. And too much hair there often makes a dog look short-backed. The Crest will naturally part and fall to either side of the dog’s neck with most Hairless. The Powderpuff coat does resemble a small AfghanHound inmany respects. It should lay flat, and be soft and silky. It should not be excessively heavy or kinky or frizzy. Again, many handlers have taken it upon themselves to shave a large V-shaped patch on the front of the necks. This disrupts the flow of a beautiful Powderpuff coat and goes

against the standard, which only states that the hair on the ears and face may be trimmed. MOVEMENT When the Chinese Crested moves, all the beautiful parts come togeth- er. With its head and tail carried up, the topline level, it moves with reach and drive. It should never hackney or appear stilted. It does not throw its front up in the air. It should not be cowhocked. CONCLUSION When judging the Chinese Crested, remember that both varieties should be given equal consideration. Re- member that it is one of the larger Toy breeds. Do not automatically put up the smallest one; put up the best one. Do not award incorrect move- ment and bad structure. And always… JUDGE THE DOG.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR My current breed is Chinese Cresteds, but I have also bred Afghan Hounds and Whippets (and I’ve also owned Collies), putting numerous titles onmy dogs in Con- formation, Obedience, Rally, Lure Cours- ing, Agility, Barn Hunt, and Scent Work. I am approved to judge four Groups (plus breeds in the other three Groups), Rally, and Lure Coursing.

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MYSTERY FROM JAPAN FIVE THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT THE JAPANESE CHIN

by Scott Toney, Midwood Japanese Chin

I bet you thought this was going to be another article about Japanese Chin breed history, grooming tech- niques, or judging procedures. Since other fanciers have already addressed those topics in the past, I thought it might be fun to share some of the “in- ner secrets” about our special breed, from my perspective. So, with tongue firmly in cheek, here are some things you should know before acquiring one of these little imps. I remember, 20 years ago while potty training my Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Saffy, that I caught her in the act of peeing on the den area rug. In my best scolding voice, I admonished, “Saffy!” and hurried her outside to show her the right place to potty. Poor Saffy looked up at me with those soul- ful eyes and had a look of torment as JAPANESE CHIN HAVE NO SHAME

if she knew she had let me down and would never do it again. Don’t count on such luck with a Chin. I’ve caught my Chin peeing on the floor, gleefully trailing toilet tis- sue through the house, and pulling buttons from my tufted sofa. One of my dogs was so excited after tear- ing up the toilet tissue that he start- ed running around the house, then scrambled back into the bathroom at full speed and jumped right into the toilet! When catching my Chin acting up, I’d remember my effective train- ing voice previously used with Saffy, and I’d say, “Penny!” or “Dottie” or “Magnus” or… (well, you get the idea) in my most shaming tones. However, on those occasions, my corrections would be met with either a selective deaf ear, a blank stare, or most of- ten, a disgusted look as if to say, “Yes, what do you want? And how dare you

interrupt me!” I swear, if Chin had middle fingers, I think they would be flashing them at me regularly. CHIN & PHOTOGRAPHS— PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE A Japanese Chin could have made Helmut Newton look like a rank ama- teur. When photographed well, they are stunning; it’s just getting that elusive great photo that’s the chal- lenge. We’ve all seen photos of a Toy dog proudly posed; head up in the air, tail proudly carried, all four feet in perfect position, and eyes intently surveying the horizon. And, at times, you’ve even seen a Chin in this very pose. Just know that there was a dear price to pay to get that photo. You can be assured that for every good photo of my Chin that is published, I have taken 477 bad ones! A Chin will stack perfectly, then, for no appar- ent reason, decide to squint right as

“Just know, there was a dear price to pay to get that photo. YOU CAN BE ASSURED THAT FOR EVERY GOOD PHOTO OF MY CHIN THAT IS PUBLISHED, I HAVE TAKEN 477 BAD ONES!”

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CANFIELD WAS MORE THAN OK, IT WAS CH * SAN SPUR’S LITTLE-N-LOADED GCH S SAN SPUR’S WIDE OPEN-N-FULLY LOADED x CH SAN SPUR’S MIRRA IMAGE

easy as 1-2-3-4 OKIE SAID IT WAS AS

#1 WD/BOW 2 POINTS THANK YOU JUDGE MS. NIKKI RIGGSBEE

#2 WD/BOW 3 POINT MAJOR THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. BARBARA DEMPSEY ALDERMAN

#3 WD/BOS 5 POINT MAJOR THANK YOU JUDGE MRS. POLLY D. SMITH

#4 WD/BOW 5 POINT MAJOR TO FINISH THANK YOU JUDGE MR. DAVID MILLER

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO LUCAS WATERS FOR TAKING THE LEAD ON THE DAY

BREEDER CO OWNER AMY FIELDS

OWNER KELLY GLASS

HANDLER PEGGY L. COFFMAN

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY DALINGTON PAWS, 970 WALLACE RUN ROAD, BEAVER FALLS, PA 15010

*PENDING AKC APPROVAL

T op N otch T oys , A ugust 2021 • 41

“IF YOU WEAR BLACK CLOTHES AROUND A CHIN, what was once a sleek shirt or sweater soon becomes covered in soft, white, Chin fur.”

I acquiredmy first Chin, I loved wear- ing black shirts and sweaters, and my den was newly decorated with a lush couch upholstered in the softest of fabrics. Little did I know that my six- pound bundle of joy would not only command my personal attention, but would also direct where thou- sands of dollars in clothes and furni- ture purchases were directed. That’s right… Chin don’t want you wearing black, and they view any upholstered piece of furniture as a personal chal- lenge to their ability to shed hair at the speed of light. If you wear black clothes around a Chin, what was once a sleek shirt or sweater soon becomes covered in soft, white, Chin fur. I’ve walked civilian (yes, non-doggy peo- ple are referred to as civilians in my home) guests to my front door and been aghast to see the back of their clothes covered in white fur. I’m sure many of them thought I was being aw- fully hands-y as I repeatedly rubbed their back and shoulders as they left my house, but what I was really do- ing was desperately trying to remove the Chin hair! And, after years of lint-brushing, vacuuming, wiping, and banging couch cushions outside, I finally gave in and bought a beautiful leather couch. Now all I have to do is wipe or blow the hair off of the cush- ions onto the floor where my Dyson Animal is waiting to vacuum it all up! IT’S TRUE—JAPANESE CHIN ARE AN ORIENTAL TREASURE On a more endearing note, I have nev- er met or owned a breed with a more unusual temperament and manner

of expression. How many times have you heard a story of a newmomor dad (of either a human or a puppy) holding their baby for the first time and hav- ing those feelings of love at first sight? And so it’s been with other breeds I’ve owned, from German Shepherds to Lhasas to Cavaliers. Each of them joined (or were born into) my house- hold and instantly wrapped my heart around their little paw. Chin, to me, are different. I’ve bought and bred Chin through the years. Every Chin I’ve bought has joined my household and been met with an honest, imme- diate, love; but, a love that grows in a most unusual way. I don’t find that Chin are typically instant bonders, or are particularly worried about im- pressing you or pleasing you. They have a quiet confidence, and while they are happy, they don’t give you all of themselves on the first day. As time passes, they become more and more enmeshed in the household and confident in their position, and that is when the real love kicks in. It’s a love borne of routine, trust, understand- ing, and tenderness. For every bit of those things you give to a Chin, you will begin to see returned tenfold. What was originally a new addition to the family is now a cherished fam- ily member with a permanent home. I think that’s why you see so few Chin breeders place their older show dogs in pet homes. They are so much a part of the family that they are hard to let go. Armed with this information, I hope you have a bit of fun insight into our special breed. The next time you see a Japanese Chin, give him or her a lov- ing pat… but don’t wear black!

the shutter closes; despite the clouds covering the sun. Or, the expression will be perfect, but just as the photo is taken they decide to twist their body, and their feet end up being splayed left and right like a ballerina’s. Woe to the show photographer who has the challenge of taking a big win photo of a Chin with a co-owner star- ing over his shoulder saying, “Please take just one more!” He or she is in for a long afternoon! It’s been said that every Japanese Chin comes equipped with his or her own personal, invisible pedometer. It numbers the total number of steps a Chin will take on a lead, usually in a ring, in its lifetime. Once it reaches that number, the Chin is done… no more steps to be had. If you’re lucky enough to get more steps after the pe- dometer expires, they are taken at the Chin’s will, pace, and pattern. Some- times, mysteriously, the number of steps can be extended… but only if the Chin is given special attention, free from all other interferences. (You know, a Chin does not like sharing your affections!) But, more often than not, every Chin will revert to its wild, unattainable, spirit-animal and will never be captured again. THE INVISIBLE PEDOMETER — EVERY STEP COUNTS CHIN ARE PERSONAL DRESSERS AND INTERIOR DESIGNERS A Japanese Chin will soon teach you that your favorite clothing color is white, and that you should only buy leather upholstered furniture. When

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MALTESE NATIONAL SPECIALTY

Norman, Oklahoma . June 14-17, 2021 photos by Lisa Caudill

T op N otch T oys , A ugust 2021 • 43

MALTESE NATIONAL SPECIALTY

Norman, Oklahoma . June 14-17, 2021 photos by Lisa Caudill

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Bred by Duoryadkin Oleg Owned by Donna Hannity Handled by Ashleight Rutzel

ADVANCE GIFT SNOWAVALANCHE grand champion

T op N otch T oys , A ugust 2021 • 45

WHAT MAKES A PUG, ROUND HEAD, SQUARE BODY, CURLY TAIL A PUG?

by Patt Kolesar Stoltz, JEC PDCA | Photos provided by PDCA

W e are all excited to get back to dog shows after our COVID hiatus. We want to restore that little bit of normal back into our dog life. It feels like we were all put on pause, there was a rewind, and nowwe are starting fresh. We are rar- ing to go. With this in mind, I would like to take the opportunity to refresh readers’ understanding of some of the points of the Pug standard. I want to empha- size a few of the nuances that make a Pug, a Pug. I want to address the high points of type in our standard. I would certainly hope that anyone officiating in the ring already has a firm grasp of what moderate angles, moderate reach and drive, double tracking, and a level backmean. So, I’ll leave that for another discussion.

I would like you to remember three important words when you think about a Pug; round head, square body, curly tail. These three words sum up the shape a Pug is expected to be. Say it again, “Round head, square body, curly tail.” Pugs are short-bodied, thickset, and square. We measure square from the point of shoulder to the ischium, and from the top of the withers to the ground. The standard calls for a Pug that is “ multum in parvo ,” which liter- ally translate to “a lot in a little.” Ba- sically, we are the concrete block of the Toy ring. Calling for a lot in a little requires substance that is not over- done; nor should it ever be coarse. A fat Pug doesn’t have substance, he is just fat, and a scrawny adult clearly lacks substance.

Admittedly, our standard can be confusing because it only addresses substance in terms of weight, stating weight from 14 to 18 pounds (dog or bitch) as desirable. And admittedly, today’s exhibits are often slightly larger than the “desired” weight we address in the standard. However, the Pug should be evaluated on the merit of its bone, muscle, and cobbiness as it relates to breed type. Always keep in mind that the Pug is a Toy breed of moderate angles. We never want to see Pugs that are excessively large, weedy, leggy, short-legged or long- bodied. Pugs never have a tuck-up. Our back is parallel to the ground and our underline is virtually the same. Think thick as a brick. Let’s move on to the curly tail. Our standard says the tail is curled as

Nose: Although the Standard does not mention the nose, a short discussion is necessary. The nose is black, wide, and lies flat when viewed in profile. The top of the nose bisects the center of the eyes. The stop is concealed by an over-the-nose wrinkle. An unbroken wrinkle, set on the nose, unifies the face. Undesirable: A nose wrinkle covering a significant portion of the nose so as to negatively affect the Pug’s ability to breathe comfortably; a nosepad that is too large; lack of noseroll.

Here is a beautiful example of square, level back, the correct underline, and profile.

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