Showsight Presents The Airedale Terrier

AIREDALE TERRIER Q&A

Airedales, and own a boarding kennel in New Bern, North Car- olina, also named Lynaire. I’ve been involved in dogs for 37 years, and have owned a boarding kennel for 25 years. Do I have any hobbies or interests apart from breeding and showing dogs? I enjoy reading, traveling, and photography. What is it about the Airedale Terrier that makes the breed so appealing? Their clownish behavior, intelligence, and regal appearance. Can I speak to the breed’s versatility and trainability? Aire- dales involved in agility, rally, obedience, hunting and working are easy to train, but get bored easily. You must make it fun. Do I compete in performance events with my dogs? I have done obedience with my dogs. How much care does the Airedale’s coat require for the show ring? A lot! Once in coat, you must work two to three hours a week. Any suggestions when it comes to sparring in the ring? We must spar Airedales. It shows them pulled together at their best, showing Terrier spirit—and it can be done safely! What are some best practices for keeping an Airedale in good condition? Exercise, working the coat weekly. Any advice for someone thinking about sharing life with the “King of Terriers?” Get ready for fun, challenges, and love. A humorous tale I can tell about my experiences showing Airedales? My first show Airedale was shown by Bobby Fisher— he taught her to pee on command. One day he asked her to pee on Peter Green’s shoe—she did! BRUCE & CARON JONES We live in rural North

Tests. We have many dedicated Airedale Terrier owners who compete successfully in all of these tests. In addition, our par- ent club (ATCA) offers special awards for Airedales who have achieved titles in multiple venues of competition. Fortunately in our breed, our conformation dogs are also either perfor- mance dogs themselves or have littermates who participate in performance activities. Do I compete in Performance Events with my dogs? I have titled dogs in obedience, ATCA Fur Hunting and Barn Hunt. I have participated in Scent Work and Agility, but have not yet titled dogs in those areas. How much care does the Airedale’s coat require for the show ring? A lot! The Airedale show coat is all hand-stripped and it is a labor of love and dedication! A specials dog will typically have eight hours of coat work every week while competing. The Aire- dale trim must be sequenced properly and kept up while the dog is being shown. Retired show dogs are often clipped and most family pets are also clipped. Any suggestions when it comes to sparring in the ring? Spar- ring is a very important tool for the judge to evaluate Airedale temperament and type. Sparring has nothing to do with aggres- sion or fighting. It is a means to see the dog stand his ground with tail and ears up, alert and ready for action. Airedale Terrier enthusiasts treasure seeing their breed sparred and they often remark, “It takes my breath away.” No amount of “free baiting” or stacking can replicate the appearance of an Airedale on a spar. Any judge who would like to learn this valuable evaluation tool can contact several Terrier breed mentors who can provide guid- ance and a demonstration on how it is done. What are some best practices for keeping an Airedale in good condition? All of our Airedale Terriers are very athletic and in great muscle tone. We have large paddocks for the Airedales to run in and because they have a pretty wide temperature toler- ance, they get good outside exercise almost every day. We pair a male and a female together and they love to romp and play. We don’t find any need for “road work” or treadmill use. Any advice for someone thinking about sharing life with the “King of Terriers?” Plan early to acquire an Airedale. Most are sold from waiting lists and there is a large demand for pet Aire- dales in many areas of the country. Work with an experienced breeder if you are interested in a show potential Airedale. Learn- ing the coat work is challenging and requires dedication on the part of both the teacher and student. For that reason, most Aire- dales are handled by professional handlers. We do have some outstanding non-professional handlers in the conformation ring too. LINDA BAAKE JARVIS I have shown Airedales as

Carolina, in a town called Pittsboro. Bruce is a retired contractor and now a full- time breeder and owner of Airedales. Caron works as a Certified Nurse Midwife delivering babies for a Duke- Affiliated practice. Total years in dogs: 40 years start- ing in Sporting dogs and switched to Airedale Terriers

exclusively over 25 years ago. Our hobbies outside of the dogs include building relation- ships with newcomers to the breed and mentoring them to show and do agility. We are also avid travelers to beaches, fishing, cruising and have been to almost every state in the US except four of them (which is a future goal). What is it about the Airedale Terrier that makes the breed so appealing? The Airedale Terrier is the most unique animal on the planet as these dogs are lovable, comical and serve their owners in such an inquisitive manner. They are always ready to do anything you want: hike, go for walks, play ball, go bye-bye in the car, go to Lowe’s and walk around while you buy house- hold needs. They never ask for anything, but, on occasion, they actually mimic talking to you. They make sounds so that you understand what they want. Can we speak to the breed’s versatility and trainability? The breed, overall, is highly versatile as you can do agility, hunt- ing, trick dog, coursing, barn hunting, farm dog and dock div- ing. Airedales were used in World War I to search for enemies

Lynaire Kennels. I have bred over 40 champions, including a Best of Breed winner at Mont- gomery and the 2019 West- minster winner. I have served on the board of the Airedale Terrier Club of America for 25 years and served in many offices including President, VP, and Secretary. I live with my husband, James, and nine

176 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JUNE 2020

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