Showsight October 2018

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CHINESE SHAR-PEI, BORZOI

*ShowSight breed & all breed stats as of 8/31/18 **ShowSight breed stats as of 8/31/18

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BULLDOG

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BRIARD

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER WHAT A BLESSING The time of year is fast approaching when many of us will be spending time at shows with family and friends over the holi- days, reflecting on life, and looking ahead to the coming year. For exhibitors, the last few months of 2018 will be the most cru- cial. Everyone wants to finish the year strong! There are approximately 15 National Specialties remaining and a few spectacular all-breed shows left this year, including the National Dog Show and the AKC National Championship. Each of these celebrated events is rich in dog show history. Together with their sponsors, Purina and Royal Canin respectively, both spectaculars do such a phenomenal job of providing a happy and safe environment for the fancy to come together to com- pete and have a good time. One of the things I appreciate most about these shows is that both organizations work extremely hard to promote purebred dogs to the millions of people who haven’t heard about our sport or own a purebred dog. The Na- tional Dog Show is televised on Thanksgiving Day and the AKC National Championship is promoted through various media out- lets at Christmastime. What a blessing for all of us. We like to think that our magazine has something to do with the growth of our sport and that is all thanks to you. As I reflect over the past nine years since joining SHOWSIGHT, I can’t help but feel very blessed myself. I’ve been blessed to have been given the opportunity to serve you and blessed to be surrounded by so many passionate people who just want to do well for our community. And I’m blessed by having the privilege to consider so many clients to be my good friends. The trust you place in our magazine makes all the effort worthwhile. Your success — this year and every year — is our success. Thank you to all our clients, readers, employees and indus- try associates. May you all enjoy the many blessings of the coming season.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE

AJ ARAPOVIC CEO and Publisher aj@aramediagrp.com Office 512 686 3466 ext 102 Cell 512 541 8128 MICHAEL R. VERAS Chief Operating Officer

michael@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 extension 101 HANIFA ARAPOVIC Vice President Public Relations & Marketing hanifa@aramediagrp.com 512 541 8687 SAMANTHA ADKINS Production Co-Ordinator, Advertiser Relations samantha@aramediagrp.com 512 686 3466 ext 103 EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Since Volume I, Number 1 JOSEPH NEIL McGINNIS III 863 816 8848 editor@aramediagrp.com

Contributing Editors BJ ANDREWS ARLENE CZECH MIKE & CATHY DUGAN JACQUELYN FOGEL ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Director of Web Development and National Distribution Coordinator DANIEL CARTIER daniel@aramediagrp.com MAILING ADDRESS ARAMEDIA GROUP, INC. PO BOX 18567, TAMPA FL 33679

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Yours Sincerely,

BRIAN CORDOVA bcordova@aramediagrp.com, 949 633 3093 TAMMY GINCEL tgincel@aramediagrp.com, 201 747 8569 AJ ARAPOVIC aj@aramediagrp.com, 512 541 8128 JOSIAH IMPASTATO josiah@aramediagrp.com, 512 541 6355 JASON ULMER julmer@aramediagrp.com, 701 799 7404

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER/PUBLISHER aj@aramediagrp.com

To see more of ShowSight, please visit our website at showsightmagazine.com FOLLOW US AT instagram.com/showsight_dogshow facebook.com/ShowSight/ To see our other brands and services, please visit aramediagrp.com 8 • S how S ight M agazine , O ctober 2018

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE is published twelve times per year by AraMedia Group, Inc. P. O. Box 18567, Tampa, FL 33679. President, AJ Arapovic. Post- age paid at Omaha, Nebraska. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of the editor. The opin- ions expressed in this publication either editorially or in advertising copy are those of the authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement by the publishers. The editor reserves the right to reasonably edit all copy submit- ted. All articles become the property of the publishers. Subscription price for third class service in the United States: $90.00. Canadian and U.S. First Class: $110.00. Overseas rates upon request. SHOWSIGHT IS SENT AS A COUR- TESY TO INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB to judge at AKC shows. Inquiries to: Michael R. Veras, COO, 512 686 3466 ext 101 or michael@aramediagrp.com.

table of CONTENTS

14 SHOWSIGHT

185 236 243 260 272 283 296 311 330

SHOWSIGHT CELEBRATES OWNER-HANDLERS

from the Executive Editor Emeritus Joseph Neil McGinnis III

38 THE REMEDY FOR

THE AFFENPINSCHER Various Guest Experts

RINGSIDE RUMINATION Dan Sayers

48 BECOMING Jacquelyn Fogel

THE BASSET HOUND Various Guest Experts

56 CORRECT ANGLES Michelle Scott

THE BOXER Various Guest Experts

104 TEAR STAINING

THE DALMATIAN Various Guest Experts

THE WHITE DOG DILEMMA Dr. Gayl M. Godsell-Stytz

112 LINES FROM LINDA Linda Ayers Turner Knorr

THE RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK Various Guest Experts

124 SURVEY SAYS

THE LABRADOR RETRIEVER Various Guest Experts

What’s one way dog shows can attract new participants?

146 MECHELEN 2018 UK VICTORY! Karl Donvil 156 NORTH BRANCH CLUSTER CANDIDS Photos by Jean Edwards

NATIONAL SPECIALTY REVIEW Various Guest Experts

SHOWSIGHT IN CIRCULATION

174 SHOWSIGHT INTERVIEWS Allan Reznik

332 COMING ATTRACTIONS 334 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

182 OWNER-HANDLED OPTIMISM Dan Sayers

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! CONTACT US: 512.686.3466 | info@aramediagrp.com | subscriptions@aramediagrp.com | www.showsightmagazine.com

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RETRIEVER (GOLDEN)

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M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S H O W M U L T I P L E R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W | S P E C I A L T Y B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

Bred by Connie Unger Owned by Connie Unger & William Lee

Handled by Chrystal & Paul Clas PHA Assisted by Casey Bair

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POODLE (STANDARD)

G C H S T O N E R U N A F T E R N O O N T E A

Thank You Judges Mr. Dennis McCoy (Reserve Best in Show) & Mrs. Elaine Lessig (Group 1), for these tremendous honors.

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Stop The Press... FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR EMERITUS Joseph Neil McGinnis III

Juniors for being active in the sport. “A mentor program is a great opportunity for Juniors actively involved in AKC events to assist new young people in AKC Events,” says Mari-Beth O’Neill, Vice President of Sports Services. The Juniors Pro- gram offers children between the ages of 9 and 18 years of

age an opportunity to compete in Conformation, Obedience, Agility, Rally, Tracking, Hunt Tests, Herding, Field Trials, Earthdog, Lure Coursing, Coursing Ability and Coonhound Events. Chil- dren participating in these sports and events develop their handling skills, learn about good sportsman- ship, dogs, and dog events. “I am excited to see how many new Jun- iors will be supported,” states Leslie Fetzer, Direc- tor of Education. “The Jun- ior Mentor Program is a great opportunity to showcase excellent sports- manship.” To learn more about the AKC Junior Mentor Program or the AKC Junior Ambassador Program, including how to sign up to be a mentor or mentee, please visit akc.org/sports/juniors/ So it’s hats off to AKC for another big step in en- couraging growth in our sport. Speaking of which, I extend my thanks and congratulations to West Volusia Kennel Club,

All set to type like the wind, telling tales of recent activities that made me smile wide, I opened one more email note and changed my gameplan, fast. For to my de- light, this photo arrived and I really wanted to share it because I think it says so much. It was my pleasure to serve on the West Volusia KC’s recent panel, and part of my assignment was Best 4-6 Puppy in Show. Little did I know that my eventual winner, “Breeze,” would bring along her coterie of young admirers (and of course her young owner/handler) for this fun Don Meyer photo. The picture feels oddly familiar, for I wore the same expression as these young ladies and gen- tlemen when I was their age and had a dog in my arms. I probably still do. In any case it rekindled my passion for wel- coming the very young, treating them with kindness and hoping, praying, that they will remain in the fancy’s embrace for the rest of their lives. It’s how many of us started. It’s how many of us intend to end up. Although this photo’s not from a Junior Showmanship class (which, by the way, I also judged and was once again thrilled at the talent being shown by these promising young people.) I also need to point out that the finalists for BPIS held a depth of quality that was a

joy to judge, and I’m very proud of these exhibitors for the happy attitude of their pups proving that they were trained with love. And I’m happy to report another program instituted by AKC to foster and promote the youth involvement in our sport. AKC LAUNCHES JUNIOR MENTOR- SHIP PROGRAM Designed to encourage, support, and ed- ucate youth participants. Raleigh, NC—The American Kennel Club is proud to announce the launch of the AKC Junior Mentor Program. The goals of the AKC Junior Mentor Program are to provide Juniors just entering the sport or those looking to sharpen their skills (mentees) with a positive role model and friend who will help them on their jour- ney to become an accomplished Junior; and, to provide experienced Juniors (mentors) the opportunity to improve their own skills while sharing their expe- riences. Mentors will provide advice and support in topics such as handling, grooming, proper dress and behavior, sportsmanship and more. Participating in the Junior Mentor Program as a mentor or mentee counts toward the number of activities required to become a Junior Ambassador, a program that recognizes

Cathy Driggers, President, Mark Driggers, Show Chair, and especially my longtime friend, the amazingly capable Susan Shephard, head of Judges Panel & Public- ity and a great breeder in her own right. And I’d like to give a shout out to the promising exhibitors in the photo: (l to r) Vaughn Hathaway, Sammy Schrager, Iso- bel Cloudman, Emily Cloudman and Liam Hathaway. You guys are awesome. This issue of ShowSight, predictably filled with great content, also highlights Owner/Handlers and Breeder/- Owner/Handlers. Having spent most of my time in the ring as the latter, I truly appreciate the work and homework re- quired to do a credible job in that capac- ity. Congratulations to all OH and BOH exhibitors. In an upcoming issue we fea- ture Professional Handlers, the ladies and gentlemen who devote their entire lives to the care and conditioning of the dogs they show. I personally thank you all. Next month, we’ll play catch up because there’s much else I want to discuss. Until then, always remember...ShowSight Mag- azine wishes you All The Best!

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GCH CENTARRA GET YOUR GAME ON SIRE: MULTI BIS/BISS CH ANAHAB’S MARK IT SQUARE DAM: MULTI BIS/BISS GCH “BRENDA”

Thank You Judge Mr. Timothy Robbins Breed Judge Mr. Steve Hayden

©Holloway

Thank You Judge Mr. Steve Hayden Breed Judge Mr. Timothy Robbins

ZELDA IS OWNED BY DIANE ADAMCIK, MARGARET HODGE & PAM LAPERRUQUE ZELDA IS CONDITIONED AND SHOWN BY PAM LAPERRUQUE | CENTARRA@GMAIL.COM

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SILKY TERRIER

M U L T I P L E S P E C I A L T Y A N D A L L B R E E D B E S T I N S H O W W I N N E R

S I L V E R G R A N D C H A M P I O N L E G E N D A L E L A D Y L U K V G O L D G R O V E A M E R I C A ’ S N U M B E R O N E D O B E R M A N P I N S C H E R * Reagan

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

T H A N K Y O U J U D G E S Best in Show: Dr. Robert Brown Group 1: Ms. Carolyn Alexander OWNER : Ke n i c h i K a t o BRE EDER & CO - OWNER : L a n a F e r g u s o n CO - BRE EDER : Go l d g r o v e Do b e r m a n s HANDL ER : An d y L i n t o n , a n d y l i n t o n 1 0@ y a h o o . c om AS S I S TANT : N i c k i S h o r t

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*ShowSight all breed stats as of 8/31/18

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PUG

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SEALYHAM TERRIER

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“WINNING IN THE RAIN”

S O M E R S E T H I L L S K E N N E L C L U B M R . R A N D Y G A R R E N

GREAT WINS AT THE PRESTIGIOUS W E S T C H E S T E R W E E K E N D

W E S T C H E S T E R K E N N E L C L U B M R . T I M O T H Y C A T T E R S O N

PROUDLY OWNED BY C A T H Y & J E R R Y G A U C H E PERFECTLY PRESENTED BY M R . K A Z H O S A K A

BIS SBIS GCHS SMASH JP COPENHAGEN

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TOY POODLE

SHE WILL STEAL YOUR HEART! B R E E D J U D G E M R . T I M O T H Y B R A Z I E R

ONE number A L L B R E E D *

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

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BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

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B R E E D * #5 * S H O W S I G H T B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 8 . 3 1 . 1 8

© R O B E R T J . S K I B I N S K I

G R O U P T H R E E T H A N K Y O U J U D G E C A R O L Y N T A Y L O R

A K C G R A N D C H A M P I O N ** #4 * * A K C G C H S T A T S A T O F 8 . 3 1 . 1 8

© B O O T H P H O T O G R A P H Y

G R O U P F O U R T H A N K Y O U J U D G E D R . T R O Y C L I F F O R D D A R G I N

C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S @ YA H O O . C O M

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G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N C H E D E L W E I S S A L I T T L E F R E A K Y D E A K Y

O W N E D B Y T R A C E Y M A I G N E , H A L C Y O N C H I N E S E C R E S T E D S | B R E D & H A N D L E D B Y K A T H Y K N O L E S

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

Always shaken, not stirred Harry

flash: BACK -TO-BACK-TO-BACK NOHS BEST IN SHOW WINS

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MALTESE

BISS GCHB SEABREEZE THAT ONE PARTICULAR HARBOR

Number One MALTESE N HS * Number Ten ALL BREED NOHS * Number One MALTESE DOG ALL BREED ** MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW MULTIPLE GROUP PLACING

Many thanks to all the judges who recognize Harry’s quality

B R E D, OWN E D A N D H A N D L E D B Y S A N DY B I N G H AM - P O RT E R

*AKC NOHS stats as of 9/14/18

**ShowSight all breed stats as of 8/31/18

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FRENCH BULLDOG

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*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8.31.18

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SCOTTISH TERRIER

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The Remedy for Ringside Rumination Dog Show Dialogue Doesn’t Have to Be Negative ARTICLE BY DAN SAYERS D og shows are in t r o u b l e . E n t r i e s

approved—with a built-in bias. The preference is clear, she argued, with standards that read, “Teeth are level or scissors.” In the opinion of my ringside mentor, “level or scissors” is not the same as “scissors or level.” The first term, she empha- sized, is preferred whereas the second is merely acceptable. I’ve been thinking about the order of words in a sentence ever since. While watching a recent Sighthound specialty, I made a quiet comment to a friend about a particular dog in a class. “Look at that dog’s beautiful neck-to-shoulder transition,” I remarked spontaneously. As it so happened, the dog’s breeder was standing on the other side of my friend and she over- heard my candid critique. “My dogs are well-known for their front assembly,” she declared with no false-modesty. A sense of relief came over me, as did a desire to learn more about her ability to produce a front with such fine, sloping shoulders and return of upper arm. As each class entered the ring, the exhibits from her kennel proved unmistakable. Their front assemblies were distinctive when compared with that of their competitors. When the Open Bitch class entered the ring, I was again struck by one particular exhibit. When I comment- ed on this bitch’s well-made front and stunning head, her breeder didn’t hesitate to specify an obvious short coming. “She’s too small,” was the reason the lady gave for placing this exquisite creature. The message was clear: Breeders who can reproduce quality consistently also have the ability to make decisions that lesser breeders may find difficult. Not every dog-related discussion begins with a bang. The simplest of greetings can sometimes lead to the most memo- rable conversations. At one Sunday show this past summer, I stopped by a handler’s set-up and found myself part of a dialogue I won’t soon forget. Under the canopy of an RV, surrounded by dozens of ribbons and rosettes awarded just that weekend, I spoke with a second-generation dog man who didn’t seem to care much about those silken sashes. In fact, he considered “winning at all costs” to be an albatross around the necks of many of today’s professional and owner- handlers. Though he felt many of the dogs being shown today are worthy of their win records, he bemoaned the fact that some of the folks who handle these dogs are not the least bit interested in breeding dogs of the same quality. It seems that many of today’s “handlers” are motivated (perhaps bur- dened) by a system that rewards the win—often despite the dog. According to the professional handler I spoke with, the sport isn’t dependent so much on the ring as it is the whelp- ing box. “Handlers can’t expect to stay in business if there

are plummeting. Majors are few and far between. Costs for everything are soar- ing. Everything is “pol- itics!” The constant refrain from some fan- ciers who lament the current state of affairs at AKC conformation shows can be enough to turn anyone away from the sport. To lis-

ten to the chronic complainers, you’d think there’s no better way to spend a weekend than to drive great distances to com- pete in a sport that offers no competition or chance to win. “The system is rigged,” say the spoilsports to anyone who will listen. Their ringside rumination—imposed on friend and foe alike—is distracting and their chorus of contempt can be deafening. However, for exhibitors in search of stimulating conversation, dog show dialogue need not be disparaging, dismissive or destructive. For exhibitors in search of stimulat- ing conversation, dog shows can still offer ample opportunity for spontaneous discussions about the breeding, showing and evaluation of purebred dogs. At one recent local show, I stood alongside a breeder of many top-winners in the Herding Group. As we watched the judging of this particular Group, I began to consider the overall proportion of some of the breed representatives in the ring. The dogs in question were beautiful, certainly, but something about them seemed “off.” Although they certainly looked the part, their height-to-length ratio seemed atypi- cal to me. As one particular dog circled the ring, I asked my neighbor for an experienced opinion. Without hesitation, this longtime breeder explained how dogs of that particular breed are intended to work, and why symmetry of outline is so important. Length in the breed, she emphasized, is due to a long ribcage and dependent on proper angles, front and rear. During the examination of another dog, I asked for the lady’s opinion about dentition. Again, without skipping a beat, she quoted that breed’s AKC standard and offered a per- suasive argument to suggest that standards are written—and

“NOT EVERY DOG-RELATED DISCUSSION BEGINS WITH A BANG. THE SIMPLEST OF GREETINGS CAN SOMETIMES LEAD TO THE MOST MEMORABLE CONVERSATIONS.” 38 • S how S ight M agazine , O ctober 2018

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18 **SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

Alex Gonzalez Photography

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RETRIEVER (FLAT-COATED)

The Remedy for Ringside Rumination: Dog Show... BY DAN SAYERS continued

are no more breeders,” he reminded. “If handlers are motivated only by rat- ings systems or the promise of another bonus, what is happening to the dogs?” The gentleman’s question is worthy of consider. For if the dog sport is not led by dog breeders, it’s going to be led by the dog traders. One of the very best reasons to attend a dog show is to spend time with others who’ve also taken up the cause to preserve your breed. Once the com- petition has ended, fanciers will often sit back and relax with the people who are just as crazy about “your” breed. Over a potluck lunch or post-show din- ner, breed-specific conversations are inevitable. Sometimes the banter is idle chitchat, but the conversation can become quite focused when the partici- pants are serious dog breeders. At one recent show, I enjoyed an impromptu discussion with one such breeder. Nei- ther of us had a dog entered on the day, but we took advantage of the time together to share news and information

about health testing, grooming styles and potential stud dogs in our breed. Our exchange included mention of dogs we’d seen in the flesh and those we know only through social media. We compared notes on type and tem- perament, and we shared opinions on the breed standard. Without a single point on offer that day, we somehow managed to delve into a breed-specific discussion that invigorated and encour- aged us both. You never know who you’ll meet at a dog show. While talking with this pub- lication’s Executive Editor Emeritus, Joe McGuiness, I was introduced to a friend of his who has bred —among other things—dogs, cavies and love birds. One of the more interesting aspects of talk- ing with someone who has successfully bred and exhibited a variety of animals is to come to the realization that a genu- ine breeder is someone so compelled to breed they can do so successfully with fauna of his or her choosing. A true breeder is an artist whose medium is

flesh and fur (or fin or feather.) Anyone can breed a litter of puppies or a clutch of nestlings, but a Breeder with a capital “B” can do so with greater consistency and success. These masters always have a clear vision for the animals they wish to produce and they have the ability to overcome the many challenges they encounter along the way. Like great dogs, great breeders have that indefin- able “it” factor. And though their good instincts are a birthright, the wisdom they possess can freely be imparted to those who wish to learn. Dog shows are not in trouble—yet. But the sport we so thoroughly enjoy depends on each of us to support one another and engage in conversations that are encouraging and respectful. Our love for dogs has brought us togeth- er and it’s our love for the dog sport that will keep us together. After all, there’s really no place quite like a dog show for people who like to “talk dogs.” Just remember, the dog show dialogue doesn’t have to be negative.

Dog shows are an ideal place for breed-specific conversation. Photo by Dan Sayers.

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SHIH TZU

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DACHSHUND (WIREHAIRED)

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BOXER

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Becoming

Commercial Breeders—Not What You Think BY JACQUELYN FOGEL F or the past three years, I h a v e reserved the

They didn’t understand what we were going to do, and they saw it as an enormous waste of three days. Both of them became quite adept at avoiding me or working on the prepa- ration for the event, so most of the preparation work fell to me, and this was clearly not within my range of expertise. I ordered the supplies, aprons and towels, made sure our Cedar Creek Pet Resort display booth was ready to set up, printed business cards for us, set prices on the items we had for sale, then told my groomers that attendance was not optional. I totally forgot about bringing a cash box or credit card reader, though I did make up some order forms for the items we were offering in our kits. Retail has never been my thing, but I’m learning fast! I also informed my two groomers that they would be going on the “farm tour” the day before the event. My daugh- ter, Andrea suddenly had a half dozen things she needed to do with her boys on that day, and Jordan said he couldn’t miss any more work time because being gone for Montgom- ery County shows was going to cost him a lot of grooming income. Again, I informed them that this was not optional, and I agreed to pay them both for the days we were in Indi- ana—and I volunteered the boys’ grandpa, Tom, to help out with their after-school activities. I may not be good at retail, but I can organize a road trip with dogs! The “farm tour” was actually a tour of commercial ken- nels in the area. It was this type of tour two years earlier that opened my eyes to the new realities of commercial breeding, and I knew my two groomers needed this introduction before they would be willing to buy into the concept of assisting commercial breeders. It worked. We toured five family opera- tions. We met the breeders and played with the puppies. We saw the amazing exercise paddocks, the spotless kennels, and the beautiful whelping areas. We saw the toys and play equipment in the yards. We heard about plans to update and modify, and we talked about what it might take to compete with their dogs in AKC shows one day. My primary observation was the remarkable improvement in the confirmation of the dogs I was seeing this year. They were exponentially better than the dogs I saw just two years ago. The Cavaliers, Bulldogs, French Bulldogs, Pekingese, Miniature Schnauzers, Poodles and Bichons were lovely and structurally sound. I knew the kennels would be beautiful based upon past observations, but I had no idea the quality of the dogs could improve that quickly. One conversation with a breeder was so refreshing that I wish I had taped it. Jordan asked why he saw so many Blue Bulldogs and French bulldogs. The breeder said they

last week in Septem- ber for a convention in Shipshewana, Indiana. It’s not a judges’ semi- nar, nor a dog show. It’s not a Field Trial or Per formance event , or a Rotary Conven- tion. It’s a convention for breeders—mostly comme rc i a l br eed - ers, though they wel- come any breeder who wants to attend. Just one condition—check your judgment at the door, and arrive with an open mind. This year I brought a team of groomers to the conference. The AKC, who has a prominent booth with tons of infor- mation and breed expertise, invited us to be an exhibitor. I jumped at the opportunity. This was my third ICAW (Indi- ana Council for Animal Welfare) conference, and I was so impressed with the first two I attended that I was more than excited to be more than a spectator for this one. The AKC asked us to demonstrate proper ear cleaning, teeth clean- ing and nail trims. They wanted us to explain how impor- tant these three simple procedures are for the maintenance of healthy dogs. Then they gave us an hour to demonstrate some basic pet grooming to show the breeders how breed- specific pet trims can both enhance the appearance of their dogs, and give them some time to one-on-one socialize, bond and health check all of their dogs. They lined up some dogs for us to groom, and assured us the dogs would all be bathed and brushed. We also brought grooming supplies to offer for sale. I reviewed and modified two grooming packages sup- plied by a grooming wholesaler, and we offered a basic and level 2 grooming kit for breeders to purchase. I ordered some grooming tables, toothpaste, toothbrushes, books and tooth polishers to sell. We also brought some of our logo aprons and towels to give away. Preparing for the show was not easy. The AKC breeder representative, Stacy Mason, was pretty clear about what she was looking for, but my two groomers could not have been less interested or engaged. They didn’t want to go. They didn’t know why an AKC breeder/groomer would want to go.

“MY PRIMARY OBSERVATION WAS THE REMARKABLE IMPROVEMENT IN THE CONFIRMATION OF THE DOGS I WAS SEEING THIS YEAR. THEY WERE EXPONENTIALLY BETTER THAN THE DOGS I SAW JUST TWO YEARS AGO.”

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A S U M M E R O F L O V E F O R

R B I S B I S S G C H C O U N T R Y S Q U I R E C E N T E R S T A G E

Reserve Best In Show • Mrs. Nancy Simmons Best In Show Specialty • Mrs. Lorraine Bisso Group I • Mr. Edd Bivin Thank you Judges

NUMBER 3 ENGLISH SETTER * *SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31 / 18

BREEDER / OWNER / HANDLER: Shaun Jordan • CO-BREEDER: Deb Jauron CO-OWNER: Carole Sel leck | Countr y Squi re, Br ighton, Colorado

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ENGLISH SETTER

Becoming: Commercial Breeders—Not What...

BY JACQUELYN FOGEL continued

“BY WORKING TOGETHER AND LEARNING FROM EACH OTHER WE ARE GUARANTEEING THAT OUR BREEDS WILL SURVIVE. THE NEXT STEP WILL BE TO WORK WITH THEM TO CREATE DEMAND FOR SOME OF THE RAREST BREEDS DESTINED TO BECOME EXTINCT IF A MARKET FOR THEM DOESN’T GROW.”

bred them because there was a huge demand for those colors. So I started talking to her about why old-time AKC breeders did not breed for those colors, explaining that a lot of health issues are color-linked. The elimination of those dogs from gene pools had more to do with health than it did with esthetics. The general public does not under- stand that some things are rare because they are not valuable or healthy, and only view it as a snobby breeder who doesn’t like a certain color because it won’t win at a dog show. They think the rare colors make the dog “special,” and therefore more valuable. The breeder did not disagree with that assessment but said that her puppies were all healthy when they left. When I sug- gested that those healthy puppies may not all become healthy adults, her eyes got wide, and she said she had not thought about that. Typically, the only adults these breeders keep are the ones they breed. They don’t see puppies after they leave the kennel, so they don’t know how the puppies grow up. They do the best they can with their puppies, but they are miss- ing the feedback loop most AKC breed- ers have with their pet buyers. These breeders were supplying a demanded color without understanding why the color became an AKC disqualification. They work in a supply-and-demand world. For the most part, it is a rational world unencumbered by politics and personal biases. They do not view the education of the public as their respon- sibility, though that may change if they know why AKC standards are written the way they are. These breeders take great pride in raising healthy, well- socialized puppies.

The actual convention was at an exposition hall on Friday and Satur- day. More than 800 breeders attended. There were seminars and demonstra- tions on everything from whelping tools to obedience and rally training. Our ears, teeth and nail seminars were well-attended and very popular. We had between 50 and 100 spectators for all or part of each of our presenta- tions, and many people stayed after to talk about breed-specific pet trims. The dogs we worked on had been bathed and brushed, though not up to our pro- fessional standards, so I knew we had a lot of work to do to do in the area of grooming. These breeders were used to using a 10 or 40 blade and stripping off all of the coat. Dematting was a skill none of them possessed. The groom- ing may have been less than we hoped for, but the soundness of the dogs we groomed was a pleasant surprise. As pet groomers, we were used to working on the endless parade of retail-rescue dogs with multiple health, temperament and structural problems. The dogs we had at this conference were sound with good temperaments. All of them would make wonderful pets. By the end of the conference we were sold out of almost all of the sup- plies we brought, and we took orders for more. The breeders asked a lot of intelligent questions, and most planned to work regular grooming into their care routines. A couple of breeders asked if we thought any of their dogs were good enough to be shown, and we assured them they could be shown if they had good consistent coat mainte- nance. My two groomers were exhaust- ed but excited to be working with such professional breeders. Yes, many of the

breeders were also producing mixed breed puppies because the market for them was still strong, but they were also keeping strong lines of purebred dogs. The mixed breed puppies were not the result of accidental breedings but planned pairings that would pro- duce cute and healthy puppies. This was a remarkable look into breeding dogs in a rational world governed by the rules of supply-and-demand rather than the emotional world of rescues and adoptions. It became clear to me that the long- term survival of purebred dogs depend- ed on the work of these breeders. AKC hobby breeders could never produce enough dogs to satisfy the demand for pets. Rather than the existential threat posed to us by the rescue groups, these commercial breeders are our partners in producing purpose-bred dogs. By working together and learning from each other we are guaranteeing that our breeds will survive. The next step will be to work with them to create demand for some of the rarest breeds destined to become extinct if a market for them doesn’t grow. I understand this is an entirely new way of looking at the world of commer- cial breeders. We are so conditioned to view them as the enemy that we have lost sight of how important they are in our battle against the very real threat of retail-rescue. There is a huge movement within the world of commercial breed- ers to get better at what they do, and they are looking toward the AKC for guid- ance. It makes sense for us to embrace their world and work with them to pro- duce quality purebred dogs. Our future depends on howwell we cooperate. It is that simple.

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B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W W I N N I N G , G R A N D C H A M P I O N MARBURL AND HAPPY TAILS Yours Truly

O U R S I N C E R E G R AT I T U D E T O T H E J U D G E S WH O H AV E A P P R E C I AT E D O U R G I R L , S H OW I N G ON O C C A S I ON I N 2 0 1 8 , S H E I S A M U LT I P L E S P E - C I A LT Y W I N N E R , A L S O A N AWA R D O F M E R I T W I N N E R AT T H E 2 0 1 8 N AT I ON A L S P E C I A LT Y.

WATCH FOR HER

BOXER

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Ari THE ESSENCE OF BREED TYPE TA K E N F R OM

PA G E 2 6 O F T H E 2 0 1 8 A M E R I C A N B O X E R C L U B I L L U S T R AT E D S TA N D A R D

BREEDER/OWNERS MARY FRANCES BURLESON | MARBURL BOXERS | DALLAS, TX | MARYFRANCES@EBBY.COM AMY BIERI | HAPPY TAI LS BOXERS | ISLAND LAKE, I L EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY LORI MCCLAIN FERGUSON | LORIMCFERGUSON@GMAI L .COM

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O U R G R A T I T U D E T O A L L J U D G E S W H O H A V E R E C O G N I Z E D P U M P K I N ’ S F I N E T Y P E A N D Q U A L I T Y

H A N D L E D B Y J A S O N S TA R R

B R E D & OWN E D B Y D . M I C H A E L B I T Z , M . D . , E S Q .

candids by ©Phyllis Ensley Photography

number A N ATO L I A N S H E P H E R D D O G A L L S Y S T E M S * ONE

*A L L S Y S T E M S A S O F 8 / 3 1 / 1 8

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ANATOLIAN SHEPHERD

Pumpkin PUMPKIN PIE G C H C H E V A L I E R S D U R O L A N D ’ S

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CORRECT ANGLES

by MICHELLE SCOTT

I ’ve seen some posts that make me wonder if people really under- stand how to look for correct angles front and rear. First, we need to establish landmarks. For fronts, we are looking for the withers, point of shoulder and the elbow. Drop the head down and you should easily feel the withers (the uppermost point of the scapula, the shoulder blade). The front assembly is held onto the body by mus- cles, tendons and ligaments so there is a fair bit of movement, as you can see

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ENGLISH SETTER

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from the position of the withers when the head is down compared to when the head is up. For many breeds, you want to have the elbow directly under the withers. To find the point of shoul- der simply lift the leg and the point of shoulder (where the scapula attaches to the humerus) will be apparent. Most breeds call for the scapula (point of shoulder to the withers) to be the same length as the humerus (point of shoul- der to the elbow)—they should also form about a 90-degree angle. The rear is more fixed because it’s attached to the pelvis/spine. If you lift the leg (like in the photo) you should find, in most breeds, that the hock lines up with the pin bone. If the hock pro- trudes beyond the pin bone then the second thigh (tibia/fibula) will usually be too long and the dog will be over- angulated behind if the pin bone pro- trudes beyond the hock the dog will usually be straight behind. It’s a lot to put it all together but if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask! ABOUT THE AUTHOR I live near Guelph, Ontario, Canada. I’ve been involved in dogs for most of my life. I grew up with Irish Setters and have been involved with Lake- land Terriers and a few other breeds over the years but my main breed for more than 30 years has been Standard Poodles. I love to cook, garden, paint, and study.

“IF YOU LIFT THE LEG... YOU SHOULD FIND, IN MOST BREEDS, THAT THE HOCK LINES UP WITH THE PIN BONE.”

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N o r w e g i a n E l k h o u n d M a l e *

OWNED BY KATHI MOLLOY, HIGHPOINT ELKHOUNDS, AKC BREEDER OF MERIT BRED & CO-OWNED BY DONNA G. WEEKS, ELGWOOD ELKHOUNDS HANDLED BY PAUL CATTERSON, AKC REGISTERED

*SHOWSIGHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

M u l t i p l e G r o u p W i n n i n g • M u l t i p l e G r o u p P l a c i n g Elgwood N Highpoint’s Summit

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NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND

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STANDARD POODLE

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A TEAM TO WATCH

J OV I & L E X I

P O U C H COV E ' S L I V I N ' O N A P R AY E R SILVER GRAND CHAMPION

OWNED BY MARK & WENDY KEYSER & CHRISTINE LaMURAGLIA EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY ALEXIS DITLOW BRED BY CHRISTINE LaMURAGLIA & PEGGY HELMING

CANDID PHOTOGRAPHY ON RIGHT PAGE BY CISSY SULLIVAN | CISSY-PICTURETHIS

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NEWFOUNDLAND

J O V I

OUR GRATITUDE TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAVE RECOGNIZED JOVI’S FINE TYPE AND QUALITY.

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IF SOMEONE TOLD YOU THAT

OF THE TOP 100 * SHOW DOGS EAT THE SAME BRAND OF FOOD S

Would you ask what it is?

SUPPORTS IMMUNE SYSTEM DURING TRAVEL & COMPETITION

HELPS KEEP SKIN & COAT IN EXCELLENT CONDITION

HELPS OPTIMIZE OXYGEN METABOLISM FOR INCREASED STAMINA

proplansport.com EXCLUSIVELY AT PET SPECIALTY AND ONLINE RETAILERS

*AKC Top Dogs SM All Breed Competition through December 31, 2017. The handler or owner of these champions may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors. Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A. Printed in USA.

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YORKSHIRE TERRIER

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GCHP OCEANO DARBYDALES’S XECUTIVE DECISION

*all systems as of 8/31/18

**DN stats as of 8/31/18

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NEWFOUNDLAND

“had the BEST summer!”

#1 Newfoundland All Systems * | A Top 10 Working Dog ** 2x National Specialty Winner | Judges Choice Winner

Thank you Best in Show judges Mr. Dennis McCoy, Dr. Anthony DiNardo, Mr. Arley Hussin and Professor Douglas Taylor.

Thank you Group judges Mrs. Deborah J. Wilkins, Ms. Debra Thornton, Ms. Sharol Candace Way, Mr. Edd E. Bivin, Dr. Anthony DiNardo, Mr. Garry Newton, Ms. F. Susan Godek and Mrs. Eva Berg.

Co-Owned By: Mary W. Price & Carol Bergmann Bred By: Gigi Griffith & Carol Bergmann

Presented By: Kim & Gigi Griffith Loved & Owned By: Kathy Wortham

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A M E R I C A ’ S # 1 DUNHILL WILL I AM MULTIPLE RESERVE BEST IN SHOW WINNING & MULTIPLE BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING BeardedCollie *

*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

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BEARDED COLLIE

OWNED BY ANNA MARIE YURA

BRED & CO-OWNED BY RAY HARRINGTON

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY JAMES BETTIS

©HOLLOWAY 2018

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Kennel I N C H A L L A H

S T O R M Y , U R I & A M A D E U S P R E S E N T S

O U R S I N C E R E S T A P P R E C I A T I O N T O A L L T H E J U D G E S W H O H A V E R E C O G N I Z E D O U R D O G ’ S F I N E T Y P E A N D Q U A L I T Y .

S I N C E 1 9 6 0 H E I K E W E H R L E I N C H A L L A H B E L G I A N S

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BELGIAN SHEEPDOG

G C H G S U M E R W Y N D ’ S AMADEUS OF INCHALL AH

owned by HEIKE WEHRLE, 847-366-1469 HWEHRLE@ME.COM handled by HEIKE WEHRLE & CHARLIE ZIMMERMAN

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Snapple thank you judges BRIAN MEYER - Reserve Best in Show CINDY MEYER & JAMES NOE - Herding Group Wins SHERRY MACLENNAN - Best of Opposite Sex at this years National Specialty

ACD BITCH ALL BREED * & NATIONAL SPECIALTY BOS 2017-2018 w i t h l i m i t e d s h o w i n g Number One

Co-Owned by: Kelli Watkins Kim Griffith

Bred & Owned by: Jacquelyn Johnson Chris Ann Moore Robert Moore

Handled by: Kim & Gigi Griffith, and Breeder/Owner Chris Ann Moore

*ShowSight all breed stats as of 8/31/18

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AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG

S H A L I M A R & O A K W O O D M E S S A G E I N A B O T T L E R E N E G A D E B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N M U L T I P L E B E S T I N S P E C I A L T Y S H O W W I N N I N G

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WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON *SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 8/31/18

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*

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Southern Gentleman SleepyHollow’s C H A M P I O N

Bred & Owned by James and Lori Mowery Presented by Lori Mowery, AKC Reg’d Handler

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SETTERS (ENGLISH)

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S H OW N S I N C E A P R I L T O P 1 0 D A L M A T I A N *

S A N T A B A R B A R A K . C A T H A N K Y O U T O J U D G E S M R . G L E N L A J E S K Y | B E S T O F B R E E D M R S . G A Y L E D E N M A N | G R O U P 2

OWN E D B Y : E R I C P A T E R S O N , E I L E E N D R A K E & C A R R I E J O R D A N B R E D B Y : C A R R I E J O R D A N , W A L T F R E S H O U R & S U Z I W A H L H A N D L E D E X C L U S I V E L Y B Y : L O R A N M O R G A N

S H OW S I G H T B R E E D & A L L B R E E D S T A T S A S O F 8 / 3 1 / 1 8

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DALMATIAN

S P E C I A L T Y B E S T O F B R E E D A N D M U L T I P L E G R O U P P L A C E M E N T S B R O N Z E G R A N D C H A M P I O N N S P I R D O N T H E M A R K C H . N S P I R D W I T H A C H E R R Y O N T H E T O P X C H . N S P I R D W I L D I R I S H R O S E Archer S how S ight M agazine , O ctober 2018 • 81

I t ’ s b e e n q u i t e a r i d e …

O u r t h a n k s t o t h e j u d g e s , f e l l o w e x h i b i t o r s a n d r i n g s i d e f a n s f o r s u p p o r t i n g C J a n d B L A Z E t h r o u g h t h e i r r e m a r k a b l e c a r e e r s .

T O R R I D Z O N E S M O K E F R O M A D I S T A N T F I R E platinum grand champion

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

M u l t i p l e g r o u p w i n n e r | R e s e r v e B e s t I n S h o w w i n n e r

b r e e d & a l l b r e e d * #4

Own e d by B e t h Me r c i e r & Mar gar e t D e F o r e ag e n t C J Favr e | a s s i s t e d by ang e l a cha s e

* ShowS i gh t br e e d & a l l br e e d s tat s a s o f 8 / 3 1 / 1 8

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MULT I PLE BEST OF BREED WI NNER • MULT I PLE GROUP WI NNER

TORR I D ZONE WHAT ’ S LOVE GOT TO DO WI TH I T Gold Grand Champion

Bred by MARGARET DE FORE Owned by BETH MERCIER & MARGARET DE FORE

Presented by CJ FAVRE & JASON STARR Assisted by ANGELA CHASE

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

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L WE WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND J U D G E D R . M I C H A E L W O O D S J U D G E M R S . A N N E K A T O N A J U D G E M R S . P O L L Y S M I T H

OUR SINCEREST APPRECIATON TO ALL THE JUDGES WHO HAVE AWARDED LARK

J U D G E D R . C A R O L W H I T E - M O S E R

OWNED BY DEBORAH BAHM & ASHLIE WHITMORE

BRED BY CAROL HARRIS

PRESENTED BY ASHLIE WHITMORE

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WHIPPET

Lark M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G A N D R E S E R V E B E S T I N S H O W W I N N I N G

photo by ©Mel i a

BO-BETT MADE ESPECIALLY FOR DEBMAR

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BREEDERS: Kathleen McIndoe, Maripi Wooldridge & Jennifer Stevens OWNERS: Kathleen McIndoe, Maripi Wooldridge, Jennifer Stevens & Tenna Grenaae HANDLERS: Tracy Szaras & Luis Abreu

Back-to-back National Specialty Best of Breed at Montgomery County Kennel Club

under breeder judges Harold Tatro & Patricia Peters

Group Judge Mrs. Claudia Seaberg

N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y & A L L B R E E D B E S T I N S H O W multiple winner

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LAKELAND TERRIER

George Best in Show Judge Mr. David Alexander

H I - K E L T E R R Y D A L E T R O U B A D O U R Grand Champion

GCH LUCANIA DELZAR’S FOREVER EDWARD X HI-KEL TERRYDALE THE EYES HAVE IT AT TOORAY CA

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MU LT I P L E S P E C I A LT Y W I N N I N G & MU LT I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G

MBIS S GCHG CH SOUNDV I EW ’ S MAST ER OF THE NORTH

P R E S E N T E D B Y J E S S I C A L E G AT H

B R E D & OWN E D B Y J U D I T H & E R I C WE B B

THANK YOU JUDGE S

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SPANIEL (COCKER) ASCOB

AM E R I C A ' S Number One A S C O B C O C K E R S PA N I E L 2 0 1 8 *

*all systems as of 8/31/18

J U D G E S B I L LY HAY E S - S P E C I A LT Y W I N & AN T HON Y D I NA R D O G R O U P 1

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