Showsight August 2020

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*AKC STATS AS OF 6/30/20

BICHON FRISE

Two Time Westminster WORKING GROUP WINNER!

OWNED BY KEITH & CHERYL ROBBINS DAVE BERREY DEBORAH CAYWOOD BONNIE WAGAMAN

BRED BY BONNIE WAGAMAN CINNIBON BOXERS NICOLE MANNA HANDLED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

SETTING NEW RECORD BEST IN SHOW JUDGE JAMES A. MOSES

TIE-BREAKING BEST IN SHOW JUDGE JON R. COLE

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

It is with great honor and appreciation we thank prestigious judges Jon Cole and James Moses for the BIS wins in Oklahoma. These two wins tied and set a new Boxer record for Best in Shows, previously held by the legendary CH Bang Away of Sirrah Crest since 1955. We would also like to extend a heartfelt thank you to all the judges that made this dream a reality. Boxer History in theMaking

JUDGES TERRY STACY & JACQUELINE L. STACY

Thank YouJudges

Wilma’s owners are profoundly appreciative of the professionalism, care, and love that Michael and Dottie have shown throughout this achievement. We are forever humbled and grateful.

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BOXER

Wagaman IFC.indd 1

G C H P 2 C I N N I B O N ’ S B E D R O C K B OMB S H E L L

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MULT I PLE BEST I N SHOW WI NNER MULT I PLE RESERVE BEST I N SHOW WI NNER MULT I PLE TOY GROUP WI NNER

#1 AFFENP I NSCHER AL L BREED * #2 AFFENP I NSCHER BREED * * #5 TOY *

* SHOWS I GHT AL L BREED STATS AS OF 6 / 30 / 20 * * SHOWS I GHT BREED STATS AS OF 6 / 30 / 20

Owned by Laura McIngvale Brown & Doyle J. Girouard Bred by Tamarin Kennels | Presented by Alfonso Escobedo & Ashlie Whitmore

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AFFENPINSCHER

GCH S TAMA R I N TAT TOO SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020 | 5

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FRENCH BULLDOG

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THANK YOU JUDGE L IZ MUTHARD

STAY

STAY

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BICHON FRISE

GCHS BARBERRY HILLWOODHOT CHILD IN THE CITY

ALWAYS BREEDER/OWNER HANDLED BREEDERS/OWNERS ELLEN M. CHARLES, LISA BETTIS, PAULA & MATT ABBOTT

BREEDER PAULA HENDRICKS

HANDLER LISA BETTIS

ASSISTED BY NATALIE TAYLOR

©Rhonda Cassidy 2019

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POODLE (TOY)

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POODLE (MINIATURE)

*SHOWSIGHT BREED & ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/20

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BORZOI

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CHINESE SHAR-PEI

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MALTESE

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*AKC STATS AS OF 6/30/20

GCHG Cerise Bonanza Following A Strong Family Tradition

CeriseEnglishSpringerSpaniels.com SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

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Number One Sporting Dog * Number One English Springer Spaniel **

handled by Howard Huber

bred & owned by Dorothy Cherry

CeriseEnglishSpringerSpaniels.com *AKC ALL-BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/2020

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AIREDALE TERRIER

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OUR SI NCERE APPRECIAT ION TO ALL JUDGES WHO HAV E RECOGN I ZED OUR EXCI T I NG R I SI NG STAR WI NSTON. THE BEST I S Y ET TO COME . . .

F O R W I N S T O N ’ S R E C E N T B R E E D W I N A T T H E L A C K AWA N N A K E N N E L C L U B S H OW I N B L O OM S B U R G , P A . THANK YOU TO JUDGE ELA INE LESSIG

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POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

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AMERICAN FOXHOUND

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BREEDER/OWNER/HANDLERS: BARBARA & DR. GARY MCNEILL BREEDERS OF MERIT . OKLAHOMA CITY, OK . 405-833-1774 . SILVERLAKEGSPS.COM POINTER (GERMAIN SHORTHAIRED)

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2 019 N A T I O N A L S P E C I A L T Y W I N N E R

B I S, M R B I S, M B I S S, G C H G SilverLakes C G C A, T K A THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS

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# 1 # 8 ALL BREED PWD *

WORKING DOG *

OWNED & LOVED BY BETH MERCIER CO-OWNED & BRED BY MEG DE FORE

PROFESSIONALY HANDLED & LOVED BY ELIZABETH VOLZ

*AKC stats as of 6/30/20

MRS. PAULA NYKIEL MS. JOANNE M. BUEHLER MS. DEBRA THORNTON MR. TERRY STACY THANK YOU JUDGES

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

IT’S GREAT TO BE BACK DOING WHAT WE LOVE!

© NOR CAL BULLDOGGER 2019

G C H P B I S M R B I S C H

TORRID ZONE SMOKE FROM A DISTANT FIRE

B N R N C G C A C G C U T K N A O M

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*AKC STATS 2019

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SCOTTISH TERRIER

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owned by JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO MOLLY LATHAM LISA BURROFF bred by KERRI KOTT HOLLY H. SCHORR always owner handled by LISA BURROFF

MULTIPLE

BISS

WINNING

GROUP

WINNING

T eSSa GCHG PENNYLANE OLE T IME STYLE V SYNERGY DOBERMAN PINSCHER 32 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020

BEAUTIFUL &

STANDARD

ARE ALWAYS IN STYLE

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FRENCH BULLDOG

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AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER 1.512.541.8128, AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM HANIFA ARAPOVIC CO-OWNER & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1.512.686.3466, HANIFA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM MICHAEL VERAS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER 1.512.893.6906, MICHAEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, HEAD OF DIGITAL BRANDS 1.908.288.7733, ALEX@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM DANIEL CARTIER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION CO-ORDINATOR 1.512.686.3466, DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM SAMANTHA ADKINS PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR, ADVERTISER RELATIONS 1.512.893.6908, SAMANTHA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ADVERTISING AJ ARAPOVIC

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.541.8128

BRIAN CORDOVA ADVERTISING SALES, CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGER BCORDOVA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.949.633.3093 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS BJ ANDREWS ANDREA BRADFORD ARLENE CZECH KARL DONVIL

CHRISTINE ERICKSON CELESTE GONZALEZ STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS MICHELLE SCOTT

WALTER SOMMERFELT SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIĆ MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA & CREATIVE CONTENT ELMA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.686.3466 INSTAGRAM | @SHOWSIGHTMAG FACEBOOK | WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SHOWSIGHT/ TWITTER | @THESHOWSIGHT

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GENERAL INQUIRIES: INFO@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM SUBSCRIPTIONS: SUBSCRIPTIONS@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM THE FROST TOWER 401 CONGRESS AVE SUITE 1540 AUSTIN, TX 78701 | 1.512.686.3466 WWW.SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM PROUDLY DESIGNED & PRINTED IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA USA

*AKC STATS AS OF 6/30/2

BICHON FRISE

Demartini FC.indd 1

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POODLE (STANDARD)

CONTENTS

40 Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC 42 Incredibly Resilient DENNIS SPRUNG 52 Breeder Interview: Mary Merlo ALLAN REZNIK 58 Breeding with Intention CELESTE M. GONZALEZ 66 Form Follows Function STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH 76 Lines From Linda LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR 96 Let’s Go to a Dog Show DAN SAYERS 98 Is the AKC Missing Out On a Tremendous Opportunity? WALTER SOMMERFELT 102 On the Line: About Being a Breeder BARBARA “BJ” ANDREWS 118 AKC News 120 Steel Valley Cluster Candids PHOTOS BY JOSEPH CIRINCIONE - JC DOG PHOTOGRAPHY 130 Mountain Laurel Cluster Candids PHOTOS BY CLUB MEMBERS

Demartini FC.indd 1

138 Carolina Foothills Cluster Candids PHOTOS BY BLAKE WILLIAMS 146 The Whippet PHOEBE J. BOOTH 156 Get Your Kicks on Route 66 PENNY DEWEY 160 Non-Sporting Group VARIOUS GUESTS 175 French Bulldog VARIOUS GUESTS 180 Keeshond VARIOUS GUESTS 200 Shih Tzu VARIOUS GUESTS

206 Coming Attractions 208 Index to Advertisers

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*AKC STATS AS OF 6/30/20

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YORKSHIRE TERRIER

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

A HELPING HAND DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

HOW ARE DOG SHOW PEOPLE RESPONDING TO THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK? “I’VE NEVER BEEN TO A DOG SHOW WHERE PEOPLE WERE AS RESPECTFUL AND AS NICE TO EACHO- THER AS THEY ARE TODAY.” This statement is one I’ve heard and seen circulating over and over within our community. WHY ARE DOG SHOW PEOPLE RESPONDING IN SUCH A POSITIVE MANNER? I’m sure you already know the answer to this question, but I will gladly say it: Because we want dog shows! In my opinion, this response deserves much more than a round of applause. It deserves us all to roll up our sleeves and offer help to the clubs. I would like to thank everyone for doing their part. With this attitude, we are going to see a lot of dog shows return. Don’t be surprised if you even start seeing shows that had previously announced cancellations come back this year. (I’ve taken a full week to call around and speak with clubs to learn about their plans. More than 90% are working to have a dog show.) The only things that can slow down the process of shows reopening are state and local regulations, and the various restrictions set by show venues. Now that I’ve shared our community’s expectations, I hope you won’t mind my sharing a little something personal from the heart. I can honestly say that I’ve never experienced an event with such a drastic impact on how we live and work as the COVID-19 pandemic. Now more than ever, we must do the right things and be prepared to take steps beyond what we’re typically required to do. In the current situation, it is vital to stay digitally connected—connected to our families, friends and communities. We must ask what are they experiencing, and how can they best be supported? Getting feedback from exhibitors, clubs, and judges is essential to chart the right course that will ensure we get many more shows back in 2020. At ShowSight , we have the infrastructure and processes in place to help you stay connected through these challenging times. We want to hear from you, so please send us your comments and concerns. You can ask questions daily at hello@showsightmagazine. com or send Facebook Messages that will be redirected to our Leadership Team and shared with our 35,000+ subscribers and over 100,000 Social Media Friends. ShowSight is going to truly bring our community a lot of success in the decade to come. As we succeed, we’re going to main- tain our community’s values, the same values that were taught to us by our grandparents, parents and mentors. As young parents, professionals and publishers, my wife, Hanifa, and I (at 30 and 32 years old respectively) have devoted our lives to each other since she was 19 and I was 20. Everyone we hire must have the same goal, and that is to move the community forward. Our philosophy is simple: You move the community forward, and the community will move you forward. This is just a fact of life. Give and you shall receive. When Hanifa and I came into this community, we were 18 and 20 years old. What we are most grateful for is how the dog show community has supported us from day one. We will continue to do whatever it takes to bring only beauty into it. We’ve already started to consider when our six- and three-year-old daughters will start showing in Juniors. We aren’t just dog show magazine publishers. This is our life and, hopefully, it will be our kids’ life as well. We love you and we will continue taking care of you to the best of our abilities, while never losing sight of what this community has been built upon. Retaining our values while growing is what I call NON-NEGOTIABLE. Over the past few years, a rumor has been going around that our community only cares about winning. I refuse to believe this. Yes, we need to go out there and compete, show to the best of our abilities, and do our best to win. But win or lose, we still gather around our set-ups after the show to open a bottle wine or beer, throw something on the grill, and enjoy informative and motivational conversations. Due to the pandemic, we all understand that these are the things that truly matter. COVID-19 has made us realize how much we actually care about one another and our community. What we all must promise to each other is that once COVID-19 is gone, we will continue to be the kind souls that we are today. If we all do this, our com- munity will prosper. Now to finish my little message: As we have all adapted very quickly to the changing environment, ShowSight ’s top priority is our community’s continued health and safety. Everything will continue running without interruption if we can all respect the robust actions plans and specific precautions put in place by those clubs that have decided to host their 2020 events. The superintendents, show chairs and their committees have worked day and night to get these shows back...and they want to do more! They just need us all to cooperate. We know that listening to them is critical right now. Therefore, in line with our core values, “Drive. Innovate. Care.” Our thoughts are with the people affected and everyone working around the clock to help those most in need. Everyone at Showsight wishes you and your loved ones good health and strength in the days and weeks ahead.

Stay safe, stay connected,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER SHOWSIGHT The Dog Show Magazine Est 1992

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*SHOWSIGHT BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/20

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MASTIFF

INCREDIBLY RESILIENT

I f we have learned anything during this pandemic, it is that our sports, clubs and exhibitors are incredibly resilient. Though faced with much uncertainty, they have found ways to still participate in dog sports both in person and virtually, and enjoy the competition and camaraderie of our sports. We are entering aphaseof a “newnormal” andour clubs are rising to the challenge. So far, we have seen four very successful show clusters, the Learning Cluster (OK), Mountain Laurel Cluster (PA), Carolina Foothill Cluster (SC), and the Steel Valley Cluster (OH). Each show hosted large entries and their members, exhibitors, judges, rings stew- ards and AKC Field Reps and made safety a high priority. The Clubs followed state, local and federal guidelines and also implemented many of the Suggested Best Practices by Sport provided by the AKC. These suggestions include: • Social distancing in the ring

• Disinfecting all common use surfaces frequently • Distancing the grooming area to comply with social distancing • Wearing face coverings when in close proximity to others, including judging • Eliminating ring seating

I would like to congratulate the clubs on their hard work, dedication and commitment to the shared respon- sibility to safety for their attendees. Your efforts are a large part of what continues to make AKC great, and we appreciate you. The AKC staff remains available to assist you Mon- day–Friday 8:00am–5:00pm EDT via Customer Service or you can email staff members as well. Together we are carefully forging ahead, and we will be successful for our sport and each other.

These suggestions and several others are designed to assist clubs in keeping everyone safe while still having a good time and earning their points. By all accounts, there were no incidents, and everyone was happy to comply with the rules set forth by the show chairs. We know there is still a long road ahead with the pandemic and that means that there are still adjustments to be made before we are back to having regularly scheduled shows. However, these recent shows give us a lot of hope that the path ahead is bright. The suc- cess of these clusters is a great sign that we are headed in the cor- rect direction and are taking proper precautions. As always, encour- age clubs to adhere to the federal, state and local guidelines when holding shows.

DENNIS SPRUNG AKC PRESIDENT/CEO

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Owned by Kay Backues , DVM | 918-521-2965 Perfectly Presented by Teresa Nail & Ray Lively | 817-454-7417 Bred By Gwen Myers , DVM & Cecilia Martinez

AJAX

I N T C H M B I S S G C H G Pengwen’s Southernwind Trojan War Triumph R O M , C D , G N , R A , N A , C G C A

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

PINNY GRANDCRU LE PIN I I C h a m p i o n

GROUP SECOND | ALEXANDRIA KC, JANUARY 2020 | JUDGE MR. DANA CLINE

Bred by: Melanie Steele & Rindi Gaudet Owned by: Deborah Bahm& Ashlie Whitmore Handled by: Ashlie Whitmore & Alfonso Escobedo

GROUP FOURTH LOST DUTCHMAN KC | FEBRUARY 2020 JUDGE MS. ROBIN RIEL

GROUP FOURTH GALVESTON KC | FEBRUARY 2020 JUDGE MRS. CLAIRE (KITTY) STEIDEL

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GREYHOUND, WHIPPET

BO-BETT AIR FORCE ONE S i l v e r G r a n d C h a m p i o n FORCE

GROUP FIRST | LOST DUTCHMAN KC, FEBRUARY 2020 | JUDGE MRS. JACQUELINE STACY

Owned by: Deborah Bahm Exclusively Handled by: Ashlie Whitmore & Alfonso Escobedo Bred & Co-Owned by: Ca ol Harris

GROUP FIRST BIG SPRING KC | FEBRUARY 2020 JUDGE MS. LORI NELSON

GROUP FIRST CORPUS CHRISTI KC | JANUARY 2020 JUDGE DR. STEVE KEATING

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# 1

MALAMUTE ALL SYSTEMS*

MULTIPLE SPECIALTY WINNING | MULTIPLE GROUP WINNING GCHG ONAK’S TOUCH OF GOLD TT, WPDA, WPDX

HANDLED BY ER I N MEYERS

OWNED BY JENN I FER & WENDY CORR RUSSELL CAPR I O BRED BY JENN I FER & WENDY CORR T I NA DUNN

*AKC ALL SYSTEMS STATS AS OF 6/30/20

APPREC I AT I ON TO JUDGE MR . BOB BUSBY

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ALASKAN MALAMUTE

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*DN STATS AS OF 6/30/20

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AFFENPINSCHER

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*AKC STATS AS OF 6/30/20

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RETRIEVER (CHESAPEAKE BAY)

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MARY MERLO EVERGREEN IRISH SETTERS BREEDER INTERVIEW BY ALLAN REZNIK

Where did you grow up? I spent my childhood in Franklin Square, Long Island, New York. After finishing college, I moved around a slight bit, and settled in Mastic Beach on the east end of Long Island. Do you come from a doggy family and, if not, how did the interest in breeding and showing purebred dogs begin? I was a very indulged child...getting everything I asked for except that one thing I wanted most, a dog. I went through all kinds of shenanigans trying to procure a dog. I even traded my bike for a beautiful black-and-silver German Shepherd that I had to reluctantly return when my parents arrived home. Once I had my own rental house, I started working at a PetLand. Someone called offering an Irish Setter for free...papers, too! Although we did not sell dogs or cats, I said to bring her in. In walked a gangly, thin Irish Setter bitch wearing a huge choke chain collar. I paid the man $30 and he gave me the dog with her papers. I was smitten and thought her the most beautiful Setter I had ever seen. I took her to a match show on Long Island, and we were awarded a ribbon. There were five pups in the class, and the fifth bitch crawled on her belly, so we took fourth place. I approached the judge and asked for his critique. He remarked, “She has the most beautiful feathering on her front legs.” That was it...I was hooked! Who were your mentors in the sport? Please elaborate on their influence. Once smitten, I went out and purchased all the books I could find on Irish Setters. There was a page showing a streamlined show dog and a barrel-bodied dog. Mine looked like the barrel-bodied dog unless I put her on a huge rock to make her topline appear similar (in my novice eye) to the show dog. I also sent out letters to all the breeders of the day whose dogs I liked from the pictures. One of those breeders was Susan Hahnen (Courtwood) in Minnesota. She was instrumental in my learning about the breed. The judge from the match show story, Ernie Viola, and his wife, Joan Viola, and close friend, Dana Haskell, were having a litter sired by a dog that I had admired from Sue Hahn- en’s line, Ch. Courtwood Spring Son. Three girls and one boy were whelped. I would go and see the pups every chance I could, and at last my first show dog was put into my arms...the

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MARY MERLO, EVERGREEN IRISH SETTERS

Four generations from left to right: Ch Evergreen Smoke N Mirrors; Evergreen Kinvale Can Do; Ch Evergreen Chase The Clouds, JH; Ch Evergreen Best Kept Secret, CD.

Evergreen puppy

Firstly, I think of the style of Irish I want (phenotype) and what dogs have that style. Dogs that I have considered always had to have a good front-end assembly, which includes all parts of the front. The dogs must have one-piece silhouettes and make your eye flow from head to tail. They must also have a cor- rect, long side head profile with proper expression. Next, I try to find dogs within the pedigree (genotype) that adhere to those qualities. I try to match up the following combinations: grandparent to grand- kid, niece to uncle, or nephew to aunt. I have found the most consistency in those combinations. I will keep the puppy that adheres as closely to what this purposeful breeding hoped to accomplish. I also like to produce a stud dog that is heavily linebred so that he can produce those qualities of the ancestors. Using a dog like this often helps to stamp type and style...and the odds are in your favor to produce what that dog embodies. Lastly, there is luck...and we all need it. How many dogs do you currently house? Tell us about your facilities and how the dogs are maintained? Currently I share my home with six adult Irish (the oldest being 13 and the grand dam of the house), a toy Xoloitzcuintli, a Sphynx cat and an African Grey parrot. When searching for my new home in North Carolina, I wanted a ranch with a connected garage that would become my kennel. I have four indoor runs with doggy doors that each go to an outside 20-foot run. The area is also fenced for some free running time. The facility is air conditioned, heated and has a stand-up tub...and, of course, a TV for our listening pleasure. My house is set on five acres and has plenty of trees. Who were/are some of your most significant Irish, both in the whelping box and in the show ring? From my first champion, Royal Irish, Joanie, Dana and I bred to another Courtwood dog named Courtwood Manuscript. That produced Ch. Kinvale Evergreen Destiny that won many Groups with me handling him. While this was happening, I bred a litter, using Ch. Cucuhullain Good Fortune, whom I had seen win the Stud Dog class at the National, with every pup moving with the same ease and carrying that gorgeous outline. Seeing that sealed the deal and I used him on Ch. Evergreen Best Kept Secret, CD. This pro- duced the beginning of the Irish I really wanted, Am. Can. Ch. Evergreen Chase The Clouds, JH—my Flavio, whom I named after the great handler, Flavio Wer- nick. That dog had the greatest headpiece and front assembly, and went on to win many specialty Bests, Groups and even a Best in Show, my first. Unfortu- nately, he went sterile after one litter. Luckily, I had kept a bitch from that litter. I designed all my breedings to try and concentrate on Flavio to bring him forward, and took a bitch that was his granddaughter and bred her back to Fla- vio’s sire, Ch. Cucuhullain Good Fortune. This produced Ch. Evergreen Good Intentions (Vincenzo) that was the number four Irish Setter for two years,

future Ch. Kinvale Royal Irish, that would go on to become my foundation bitch. My very first dog show was the 1978 Irish Setter National Specialty in Elyria, Ohio. The pups were three days into being six months old. Annie Clark was judging bitches. In a huge class, we walked out with a second place and her litter sister took fourth. Now there was no stopping me! When it came time to breed my first champion, I talked at length with my mentors, Joanie and Sue. Neither one pushed me in any direction. They allowed me to pursue what I thought would be a suitable breeding, always asking why and making me verbalize my thoughts. As it turned out, I chose the dog of my dreams, Ch. Courtwood Summer Forecast, that was a full broth- er to Royal Irish’s sire. In those days we shipped our bitches to the sire, and when Sue saw Royal Irish in the flesh she commented that she did not think Simon was the right stud dog for her. I was devastated and in tears. Sue recommended another dog, Ch. Charl- ton’s Moon Lover, that was a son of Summer Forecast. After composing myself, I called Sue back. Who was I to question what she thought to be a better breeding? After all, she was a successful breeder and I had never bred a litter. That breeding produced my first Bred-By cham- pion, that won two specialty five-point majors from Ted Eldredge of Tirvelda fame, including a Best of Opposite Sex over champions. I remember that day, and the honor was all mine to be showing with fellow successful breeders of the time like Rose Ross (Mead- owlark) and Penny Nunnally (Scarlly) in that same class. I hoped to get a fourth in that kind of competi- tion, but Ted took us all the way to BOS. I remember calling Joanie and she kept asking me for the color of the rosettes...it seemed so incredulous. I was support- ing the entry, the second time Ted had her at the AKC Centennial weekend. I did not think he would put her up, but he did. He told me she was every bit as good as what he bred. My heart swelled. The Evergreen Irish Setters are widely known, highly successful, and well respected. What breeding philosophies do you adhere to?

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#7 OVERALL*

*SHOWS I GHT ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/30/20

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RETRIEVER (LABRADOR)

MARY MERLO, EVERGREEN IRISH SETTERS

winning two Select Dog awards at the National, along with many spe- cialties, Groups, RBIS and BIS. Probably the most successful breeding I have done so far, was going to Ch. Vermilion’s Sea Breeze (Westminster RBIS, number one Irish) with a stud fee puppy bitch I had picked out. This puppy was by my Ch. Evergreen Smoke N Mirrors, JH to Ch. Beaubriar Saxony Infatuation. This puppy became Ch. Evergreen B’briar Celebration, that holds the record of winning 22 Best in Sweepstakes. When bred to Ch. Vermilion’s Sea Breeze, she produced two puppies, a boy and a girl. The girl, Ch. Evergreen Set Fire To The Rain, was RWB at the National. Then the fol- lowing year (not shown for a year because I was showing Vincenzo) she took WB at the next National. Claudette went on to win back-to-back National Specialty Best of Breeds, multiple Best in Shows, was the num- ber one Irish for two years, and number 12 Sporting Dog, all breeder/ owner-handled! A feat I am most proud of. Please comment positively on your breed’s present condition and what trends might bear watching. I am pleased to say many breeders are now concentrating on their dogs’ front assemblies. I see much improvement over the earlier, straight- er fronts with the swooping rears that had come to represent Irish Setters. Dogs are not so overdone on their stacks, where this lack of fronts and the sweeping rears were evident with a pronounced, far too sloping topline. There is nothing prettier than a free-flowing, effortless side picture with an Irish...and many breeders and handlers are working to achieve this balance in flow. Training and conditioning are important. The sport has changed greatly since you first began participating. What are your thoughts on the state of the fancy and the declining number of breed- ers? How do we encourage newcomers to join us and remain in the sport? Ah, the million-dollar question. In the past, more people stayed around to watch Groups and talk dogs with others. Invaluable knowl- edge was shared back then. The professional handlers (breeders them- selves), when they knew you were serious, would sit, talk and explain... again, invaluable information. As we all can see, much of the dog-show population is the older crowd. I know so many of us try and get puppy people interested in the avenues open to purebred dogs. Everyone needs a mentor. No one gets this done on their own. Where do you see your breeding program in the next decade or two? I am a firm believer that bitches are the strength in breeding. I hope to continue to produce dogs that are known for their breed type and move- ment. I will keep a bitch from a breeding that embodies what I had hoped for and look to find a suitable sire. I am not against importing semen and using frozen from dogs of long ago—if that is what is needed to get that look. It has been a wonderful opportunity to use dogs from the past and bring their qualities forward again. Finally, tell us a little about Mary outside of dogs...your profession, your hobbies. Originally I had planned, since junior high, to become a professional percussionist, hopefully playing with a major symphony or in the pit on Broadway. I devoted hours and hours to my craft and played profes- sionally, but just not at that upper echelon. While in college (Hofstra University) my mother forcibly encouraged me to take education classes while on a full music scholarship. Although I reluctantly listened to her, now I realize the importance of her advice. I spent 30 years in education at the high school level, teaching Spe- cial Education. School and dog shows just seemed to go together...with plenty of weekends to travel and do my thing. I was also able to dabble in clay work. I enjoy sculpting dogs and have a number of people who share their homes with one of my creations. Presently, I enjoy my retirement, and love my home and friends in North Carolina. God bless.

GCHG Evergreen Set Fire To The Rain – Claudette

Claudette on the move

GCHP Evergreen Good Intentions - Vincenzo

CH Evergreen Chase The Clouds, JH - Flavio

56 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020 | 57

FOURTH IN A SERIES WITH INTENTION

BY CELESTE M. GONZALEZ

T his series is a discussion about the natural ten- sion that exists between how we view show dogs, field/working dogs and dual-purpose (show and work/field) dogs. The dog grouping last dis- cussed was the multi-sense hounds. This month, we will explore those questions for several functional groupings within the AKC Working Group. How does the evolved morphological form relate to past and/ or current function? How and why is it that some breeds have devel- oped different types for field/work and show? What are the actual or perceived similarities and differences between the purebred show dog and field/work dog? What have breeders done to breed dogs that can do the job for which they were intended, if it still exists, and if not, what simulations exist that are as close to the original intent as possible? Before standards were written for the Working Group breeds we recognize today, dogs were already being used and selectively bred to perform certain work. Multiple factors impacted the development of these breeds and their continued evolution, including geography, cli- mate and terrain, culture and customs, as well as type of work to be per- formed. Within this Group, we find breeds that serve as flock/livestock guardians, human/property guardians, farm dog/draft dog/watchdog, sled dogs, and other purposefully evolved dog breeds working in various jobs via snow, water, or big game hunting. In so many cases, the original purpose of the breed has been supplanted by technology and machinery, enabling man to do the dogs’ work faster and more efficiently at times. Still, there are dedicated breeders who continue to breed quality speci- mens that demonstrate the individual breed’s working abilities where the actual work, or a simulation, exists. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) has divided this grouping of dogs—all found in the AKC Working Group—mainly into two distinct groups: Spitz (FCI Group 5); and Molossian (FCI Group 2). Two of the breeds, Komondor and Kuvasz, fall into FCI Group 1

58 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020

ACE & ADRIAN

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020 | 59

IRISH WOLFHOUND

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60 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020 | 61

BREEDING WITH INTENTION

characteristics and restore the breed. In 1931, before the outbreak of World War II, the Akita Inu was declared a Japanese National Monument. World War II dealt yet another blow to the breed, as the wartime government had ordered the culling of all non-mil- itary dogs. Without adequate food for themselves or their dogs, concerned owners turned their Akita Inu loose in remote moun- tainous areas to fend for themselves, rather than be killed. There they crossed back with their ancestors, the Matagi. During this wartime, some American soldiers returned from duty with Akita Inu. During the occupation, the breed began to thrive again. It is thought that the American Akita descends from the pre-restora- tion efforts as well as these later imports. The post-World War II era brought a divergence in type between the Japanese Akita and the American Akita. The Ameri- cans who brought back Akitas focused on the larger, more sub- stantial and intimidating dog, while the Japanese were dedicated to restoring the Akita Inu with its finer features and fox-like head to national monument status. The Akita Inu’s acceptable colors are white, red, or brindle and no mask, whereas the American Akita is allowed to be white, brindle or pinto, as well as having a black mask. Today, the Akita can be found participating in many canine performance events, although none is type or breed-specific. It has been hundreds of years since Akitas were used as a fighting dog; however, it still remains the faithful and watchful companion of its family members, much as it was with samurai. Since the AKC allows the different types of Akita (Japanese and American vari- ants), fanciers and adjudicators must be aware of these differences in their considerations. In FCI countries, the two are bred and judged as separate breeds, with obvious differences in type. Three Spitz breeds in the Working Group are considered Nor- dic sledge dogs; the Alaskan Malamute, the Samoyed, and the Siberian Husky. Originally bred for their strength, endurance, and to pull the heavy, packed-up camp materials over snow and ice, the Alaskan Malamute helped its nomadic owners move between hunting and fishing grounds around the Norton and Kotzebue Sounds of Alas- ka’s coast. The breed predates the emergence of modern breeds in the 19th century. The progenitors were known almost 1,000 years ago and the breed is thought to have been bred by the indigenous Malamuit people of the Norton Sound and the Inuit of the Kotze- bue Sound regions of Alaska. The parent club in the United States recognizes various lev- els of breed-specific competition encompassing sledding work, including working lead dog, pack dog or team dog, and weight pull. The breed is known for its ability to pull heavier loads at a slower pace over long distances. The breed is still in use as a rec- reational sled dog as well as being used in skijoring, bikejoring, carting (dryland), and packing. The drafting of sled dogs by the United States Army during World War II had an impact on the number of dogs remaining in the breed. In addition to the original Kotzebue strain, two addi- tional strains (M’Loot and Hinman) were admitted to the stud book in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Between these additions (and the natural differences in leg lengths and coats due to geo- graphical separations among the nomadic Inuit of the Arctic area) there is some drift in type styles, but not in working ability. Differences in appearance between show dogs and working dogs are driven primarily by coat presentation. The working dogs, be it for pleasure, competition, or actual work, are not bathed and forcefully dried as frequently as the show dog. These dogs usually

The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs.

Some of those traits are a strong desire to work, courage, intelligence, trainability, a strong bond with

the handler, perseverance, protective instinct, and a good sense of smell.

(Herding, Sheepdogs). The Portuguese Water Dog falls into FCI Group 8 (Retrievers, Flushing, Water dogs). Neither the Chinook nor the Boerboel are classified or recognized by the FCI. Five of these breeds (Cane Corso, Doberman Pinscher, Giant Schnauzer, Rottweiler, and Boxer) are subject to working trials. For these breeds, their working ability is commonly demonstrated via IPO/ Schutzhund. Internationale Prüfungs-Ordnung (IPO) is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles. Within the Working Group, the Black Russian Terrier, not named in FCI as subject to working tri- als, also participates in IPO/Schutzhund. The purpose of Schutz- hund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are a strong desire to work, courage, intelligence, trainability, a strong bond with the handler, perseverance, protective instinct, and a good sense of smell. The various levels of Schutzhund working trials encompass tracking, obedience, and protection. There are various Schutzhund associations within the United States, some focusing on one or multiple eligible breeds. In this installment of the series, the Spitz type dogs (Akita, Alaskan Malamute, Samoyed, Siberian Husky) will be explored. Originating from native dogs of the Japanese Akita prefecture, the Akita was known as far back as 1,000 years ago. During the 17th century, the breed was used in dog fighting, and from the 17th through the 19th centuries as a companion to samurai (Japa- nese military nobility). The Akita, as recognized by the AKC and in the US, is a vari- ant of the original Japanese Akita. The FCI and Japan Kennel Club recognize them as two different breeds; the American Akita and the Akita (also known as Japanese Akita, Akita Inu), whereas the AKC recognizes them as one breed. There is a noticeable dif- ference between the two, however, especially in size, substance, acceptable coloration, and type properties. This is due in part to a steep decline in numbers in Japan in the early 20th century and its cross-breeding with German Shepherd Dogs, St. Bernards, and Mastiffs. This caused a loss of the spitz type characteristics. A native Japanese dog, the Matagi, along with the Hokkaido Inu, were used to breed back into the Akita and regain its Spitz type

62 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020 | 63

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BREEDING WITH INTENTION

have thick, woolly, and sometimes oilier undercoats while having the coarse outer guard hair coat. Too often the show dogs have coats that are blown dry and open, losing their protective lay. The full, plume-like tail is also protective, shielding the face and nose from blowing snow when staked out. Feet should be snowshoe- shaped to enable greater displacement of body weight through the snow. Another breed that predates the emergence of modern breeds in the 19th century is the Samoyed. Siberian in origin, the Samo- yed was originally used for hunting, herding reindeer, and hauling the sleds of the nomadic Samoyede peoples. The herding of rein- deer was primarily achieved through tending and driving; how- ever, the breed has not been purposefully used for this in over 100 years. Today, the breed as a whole does not exhibit a consistent desire or interest in herding. Despite being “prettied” for the show ring, the Samoyed retains the type of its ancestors as well as the general hobby use of its working abilities. Trimming is verboten in the breed; however, trimmed/shaped specimens do enter show rings and are easily dis- cernible to the learned eye. The parent club recognizes various breed-specific working cat- egories, including sled and cart racing, excursion sledding or cart- ing, weight pull, packing, skijoring, and herding. It also awards progressively more difficult working Samoyed titles that encom- pass one or more of these disciplines, with the highest level having to succeed in at least four of the disciplines. Originally bred over a period of almost 3,000 years by the Chukchi people of Northeast Asia to guard, pull sleds, herd rein- deer, and provide companionship, the Siberian Husky was well adapted to life in the harsh, cold Siberian Arctic environment. During the summer, the dogs were released to hunt in packs and fend for themselves. As winter approached and food became scarce, the dogs returned to the villages for sustenance (their own) and to assist the Chukchi with their needs. The breed retains a primitive hunting instinct. The Chukchi dogs were brought to Alaska as sled dogs in 1908- 09 by a Russian fur trader during the Nome gold rush. Leonhard Seppala, famous for his Siberian Husky team’s 340-mile diphthe- ria “serum run” in 1925, demonstrated the speed and endurance inherent in the working aspects of the breed. Thereafter, Sep- pala became active in sled dog racing in the Northeastern US. Some direct imports from Siberia in 1930, plus Seppala’s dogs, sowed the seeds of the modern Siberian Husky. Today’s Siberian Husky most closely resembles those imports from 1930. However, emphasis on the show ring has brought about a stronger focus on greater consistency of type, markings, and furnishings. Needless to say, the forced air blow-drying of coats renders them plush, open, and non-protective. “Rather than selecting for size and strength as the Inuit always had, the Chukchi dogs were chosen for obedience and endurance. They would run at only moderate speed, but for long distances. They would be small—and hence easy for families to provide for—and each dog would have an amiable disposition that would make them ideal for working as part of a larger team.” 1 Presumed to have gone extinct as a working dog, the Chuk- chi dog was found in 2001 when Benedict Allen traveled to the Chukchi peninsula and northernmost reaches of the Bering Strait.

There he found the breed still being used for its intended pur- pose. The demise of the Soviet Union had curtailed the govern- ment handouts to the people of the region and, once again, the indigenous sledding/herding dogs enabled their people to endure. The parent club in the United States maintains a working pro- gram in order to perpetuate the breed’s working and performance capabilities. There are various award levels within the sled dog program. It is interesting to note that a “sprint” race is considered to be four miles. For distance races, the minimum distances are 8 to 10 times the number of dogs in the hitch, i.e., 8 x 6 dogs in hitch = 48 miles, 10 x 12 dogs in hitch = 120 miles! There are individu- als who actively exhibit in the breed ring and participate in hobby sledding and carting as well as competitive sledding. This writer recently became aware of a well-awarded Siberian Husky bitch whose winters are devoted to sledding with her owner/musher. Are we paying attention to the original intent of the breed when observing it? How conscious are we of these real and per- ceived differences when we make our judging decisions, be they in the show ring, working trials, sledding work, or in breeding? Is there is a divergence in type or morphology? What are we doing, as breeders and judges, to close the gap? I’ll look forward to your commentary and questions on this article, as well as the ones that follow in this series. Feel free to send your comments to info@aramediagroup.com or to me at jol- lytimehounds@northstate.net . The parent club recognizes various breed-specific working categories, including sled and cart racing, excursion sledding or carting, weight pull, packing, skijoring, and herding. It also awards progressively more difficult working Samoyed titles that encompass one or more of these disciplines, with the highest level having to succeed in at least four of the disciplines.

1 “An iceman’s best friend”. Benedict Allen in Geographical , December 2006.

64 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, AUGUST 2020 | 65

SPANIEL (ENGLISH SPRINGER)

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

I n previous issues I have been quoting an article by Hayes Blake Hoyt from 1966, which was included in Frank Sabella’s book The Art of Handling Show Dogs, printed in 1980. In this issue, I am finishing out the chapter “Know Your Breed” which followed the article by Mrs. Hoyt. The remainder of the chapter was written by Mr. Sabella and his words still ring true today. Again, my thanks to him for allowing me to share this with you all. My few comments appear in parentheses.

Balance in dogs, just as in other instances, means harmonious or proper proportion. The Glossary in The Complete AKC Dog Book defines “Balanced” as “a consistent whole; symmetrical, typically proportioned as a whole or as regards its separate parts, i.e., bal- ance of head, balance of body or balance of head and body.” A bal- anced dog presents a well-proportioned appearance. One feature is never so outstanding that it overshadows another; in other words, every part of the dog is in harmonious relationship, each one fitting together properly as described in the breed standard. As Mrs. Hoyt previously stated, “A dog most typical of its breed is not exaggerat- ed; he is so much in perfect balance that at first glance he appears far from extraordinary... True type, because it is functional, is always completely balanced.” It is also important to know what is fashionable in your breed today. In dog show language, fashion refers to the kind of dog cur- rently being exhibited. If you want to be a successful exhibitor, it is very important that you understand your breed’s current require- ments, for no breed ever remains status quo! To prove this state- ment, you need only to look through books on your breed’s history and examine photographs of dogs of the past. Regardless of the breed, while these great dogs of yesterday are typical of their breed, you will note that they are subtly different from the dogs that are being bred and shown today. Because of the top winning that certain dogs have done in any specific breed, there may be the start of a trend or fad that is not always necessarily correct. Unfortunately, this occasionally does happen and it can be perplexing to an exhibitor, especially one that is sincere about learning and trying to perfect what he or she feels is proper for the breed. If you know your breed standard and are not just showing to win and, in particular, do not want to contribute to

changing your breed because of certain fads, don’t be discouraged if you feel that your dog corresponds correctly to its standard. It is always difficult for a new exhibitor to understand what makes a certain dog win consistently, but almost every novice experiences this same problem. In the dog fancy, self-education has its limitations and we cannot stress too strongly that if you feel insecure about the information you have gathered, you should not only watch people you admire in the ring, but also seek out their advice to gain additional knowledge on your breed. Not enough can be said learning from watching. Spend as much time as you can observing knowledgeable people in your breed, particularly if you like their styles of presentation and the dogs that they are show- ing. Keep your eyes and mind open every time you attend a dog show and you will come away with a little more education. Don’t be afraid to talk to the experts in your breed. Most professionals, when “In dog show language, fashion refers to the kind of dog currently being exhibited. If you want to be a successful exhibitor, it is very important that you understand your breed’s current requirements, for no breed ever remains status quo!”

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