Showsight - July 2021

POINTER (GERMAN SHORTHAIRED)

GREYHOUND

Schmelkin Prideaux.indd 1

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AFFENPINSCHER

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1 No. Lhasa Apso NO. 8 NON-SPORTING ALL-BREED *

Handled by DEVON KIPP Team Andy

XERALANE KENNEL, ADRIAN AGARD, EARL TAKAHASHI, BONNIE PRATO, CLIVE HARROLD & CAROL AGARD

*AKC STATS AS OF 5/31/21

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LHASA APSO

Andy SHUT UP AND KISS ME GCH XERALANE’S

Heartfelt gratitude to judges Mr. Dennis McCoy for the Westminster Group 3 and Ms. Evalyn Gregory for Best of Breed!

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SAMOYED

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Zen GCH iLove Rhapsody Always Zen

Owner/Breeder: iLove Maltese Cynthia Chan Lee www.facebook.com/iLovemaltesecr/ www.ilovemaltese.com

Handlers: Rhapsody Legados Kennel Tonia Holibaugh Edgar Cruz Guevara

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MALTESE

Thank Judge Mr. Bill Lee FOR THIS WIN ON LOVELY COMPETITION FOLLOWING THE MALTESE NATIONAL.

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/21

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AIREDALE TERRIER

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N B I S S R B I S G C H B C H FLINTCREST FIVE STAR GENERAL

Breeders: Colleen McDaniel & Stacy Duncan

Owners: Stacy Duncan & Cat Shelby

Handler: Stacy Duncan

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SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)

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P

Thank you judges Col. Joe Purkhiser and Mr. Jon Cole

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GREYHOUND

Pinny CHAMPION GRANDCRU LE PIN II

© photo by greg

Bred by MELANIE STEELE RINDI GAUDET

Owned by DEBORAH BAHM ASHLIE WHITMORE

Handled by ASHLIE WHITMORE ALFONSO ESCOBEDO

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I N T C H B I S M B I S S G C H G Pengwen’s Southernwind Trojan War Triumph C D X , R E , N A , C G C A , R O M

thank you judge Mrs . Judith Brown

thank you judge Mr. Dennis Gallant

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

Owned by: Kay Backues , DVM 918-521-2965 Perfectly Presented by: Teresa Nail & Ray Lively

Bred By: Cecilia Martinez & Gwen Myers , DVM

AJAX

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NORWICH TERRIER

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Thank you judge

“Beautiful exhibit with a compact body and good spring of rib. Pretty face with kind expression and large round eyes with a well- cushioned muzzle. Excellent movement both coming and going. This gal has so many good things going for her!” Dr. Margaret Reed

GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera Owned by Michele True, Co-owned with Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier Bred by Dawn Stevens-Lindemaier candid photography by©SueBee Photography

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CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL

GCH Legacy Chenin Blanc with Evera

*CKCSC stats 5/12/21 #1 Blenheim Bitch in the Nation * CKCSC-USA

Our sincerest appreciation and gratitude to Judge Mrs. Evalyn Gregory for including Bliss in the cut at Westminster Kennel Club. Congratulations to Best of Breed Winners and Westminster Kennel Club for putting on an extraordinary event.

FLASH SARASOTAKENNEL CLUB 6/16/2021 JUDGE: Mrs. Barbara Dempsey Alderman OS/BOBOH JUDGE: Mr. Gary L. Andersen SEL/BOBOH GREATER VENICE FLORIDA DOG CLUB INC (2) 6/18/2021 JUDGE: Michael Canalizo BOBOH MID-FLORIDA CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL 6/19/2021 SWEEPSTAKES JUDGE: Gwendolyn Wells SEL/BOBOH

Is Making A Big Splash

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BOOM! BACK IN THE RING FOR 6 WEEKS 2021 #1 MALTESE!

MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOWWINNER MULTIPLE AMA BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOWWINNER

GCHS. MARTIN’S TIMEBOMB PUFF

OWNED BY ROY & JO-ANN KUSUMOTO

BRED, OWNED & HANDLED BY DARYL MARTIN

2020 AKC BREEDER OF THE YEAR TOY GROUP HONOREE

WATCH FOR HIS PUPPIES SOON TO BE SHOWN!

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/21

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MALTESE

MALTESE ALL BREED* # 1

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POODLE (TOY)

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M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N E R

Looking For Top Gun

GCH Bon Idèe’s Quantico

# 1 B O U V I E R * # 2 A L L B R E E D *

B R E D A N D OWN E D BY A N G I E MOT TA A N D B R E N DA WAT S O N P R O F E S S I O N A L LY P R E S E N T E D BY C A R LO S C A R R I Z O A S S I S T E D BY S O N O H O YA M A DA

B O N I D È E B O U V I E R S B O N I D E E B O U V@ YA H O O . C OM

*A KC S TAT S A S O F 5 / 3 1 / 2 1

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BOUVIER DES FLANDRES

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thank you JUDGES

multiple B ISS wi nn i ng

group wi nn i ng

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

owned by JOANN & ROY KUSUMOTO ,

MOLLY LATHAM & L ISA BURROFF

bred by KERRI KOTT &

HOLLY H . SCHORR

always owner handled by

L ISA BURROFF

GCHG PENNYLANE OLE T IME STYLE V SYNERGY

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POODLE (STANDARD)

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AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER 1.512.541.8128, AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM HANIFA ARAPOVIC CO-OWNER & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1.512.686.3466, HANIFA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM MICHAEL VERAS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER 1.512.893.6906, MICHAEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ALEXANDRA GEBHARDT CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, HEAD OF DIGITAL BRANDS 1.908.288.7733, ALEX@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM DANIEL CARTIER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION CO-ORDINATOR 1.512.686.3466, DANIEL@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM SAMANTHA ADKINS EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR 1.512.893.6908, SAMANTHA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM ADVERTISING AJ ARAPOVIC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PUBLISHER AJ@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.541.8128 BONNIE GUGGENHEIM BONNIE@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM 512-971-3280 MEEGAN PIEROTTI-TIETJE CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGER MEEGAN@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM 512-593-5517 RYAN TEPERA CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGER RYAN RYAN@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM 870.723.0212 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS BJ ANDREWS LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR ANDREA BRADFORD ARLENE CZECH KARL DONVIL CHRISTINE ERICKSON CELESTE GONZALEZ STEPHANIE SEABROOK HEDGEPATH ALLAN REZNIK DAN SAYERS WALTER SOMMERFELT LEE WHITIER SOCIAL MEDIA ELMA BEGIĆ MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA & CREATIVE CONTENT ELMA@ARAMEDIAGROUP.COM, 1.512.686.3466 INSTAGRAM | @SHOWSIGHTMAG FACEBOOK | WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SHOWSIGHT/ TWITTER | @THESHOWSIGHT GENERAL INQUIRIES: INFO@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM SUBSCRIPTIONS: SUBSCRIPTIONS@SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM THE FROST TOWER 401 CONGRESS AVE SUITE 1540 AUSTIN, TX 78701 | 1.512.686.3466 WWW.SHOWSIGHTMAGAZINE.COM PROUDLY DESIGNED & PRINTED IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA USA

POINTER (GERMAN SHORTH

Simpson Nunes FC.indd 1

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Multiple Group & Reserve Best In Show Winning GCHG. Argon’s Percival Proctor Baxter CGC

Baxter

All-Breed Flat-Coated Retriever * #1

* DN s tats a s of 5 . 3 1 . 2 1

“ S p e c i a l t han k s to s p ort i ng au t h or i t y Ms . B onn i e T h r e l fa l l for r e c o g n i z i ng B ax t e r a s B e s t of B r e e d i n a h i g h qua l i t y e nt ry and to Mr . Jame s C ov e y for s e l e c t i ng B ax t e r to b e a part of h i s f i na l c u t of 8 i n t h e S p ort i ng G rou p at t h i s y e ar ’ s h i s tor i c We s t m i n s t e r K e nn e l C lu b . “

Hand l e d by Rac h e l K u l p , r k hand l i ng@yah o o . c om

Own e d by L au r i e & Mar k Mar s t e r s

B r e d by Jame s ( Jak e ) Ca s saday

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RETRIEVER (FLAT-COATED)

CONTENTS

Message from the Publisher AJ ARAPOVIC Lines from Linda LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR Morris & Essex Kennel Club WAYNE FERGUSON Preserving Your Memories WALTER J. SOMMERFELT

42

Simpson Nunes FC.indd 1

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Barkaritaville 2021 WALTER J. SOMMERFELT

154

48

Westminster 2021 VARIOUS GUESTS The Pug VARIOUS GUESTS Ring Ready VARIOUS GUESTS The Scenthound VARIOUS GUESTS

168

52

226

Form Follows Function STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

76

229

Vicki Seiler-Cushman Breeder Interview ALLAN REZNIK Candids: Western Ohio Summer Cluster BOOTH PHOTOGRAPHY

96

254

116

The West Highland White Terrier VARIOUS GUESTS

275

Candids: Chickadee Cluster JEAN EDWARDS Candids: McKinley Kennel Club JANET LASATER Candids: June Strawberry Cluster JORDAN ISOM Candids: Barkaritaville Cluster CINDY SHAFFER

128

The Rottweiler VARIOUS GUESTS The Barbet VARIOUS GUESTS

283

140

288

144

Coming Attractions

290

148

Index to Advertisers

292

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Presented by Joanne Thibault

T AYL O R AM GCHS / CAN GCH

SEABURY’S MADE TO MEASURE, AOM BRED AND OWNED BY ROSLYN ESKIND, SEABURY (REG’D) PWDS CH Keevabay’s Fifty Shades x GCHB Seabury’s Sophie Tucker, AOM

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PORTUGUESE WATER DOG

A M E S S A G E F R OM T H E P U B L I S H E R

BIG DOG SHOWS CREATE BIG BUZZ

BUILD TRUST This is an often-overlooked benefit. However, host- ing events—especially for newly-formed organizations— shows that you’re the real-deal. Not only do you exist, but you have the means to host a local event that attracts exhibitors from throughout the country! It doesn’t matter how big or small the event is. All that matters is that folks are able to connect with your show and your mission. FUNDRAISING Local businesses can join in and organize an event to raise funds for charity. Giving back to the community is a great way to raise awareness about an important cause while gaining some recognition for your organization too. ESTABLISH THOUGHT LEADERSHIP Holding a seminar or hosting a meet-and-greet for dog lovers in your area will provide value to your community and help to establish your club as an important resource. HAVE FUN What could be better than seeing people in your com- munity coming together to have a great time? People will be sure to enjoy themselves at your event. After all, every- one who shows up loves dogs, right? They’ll thank your club for its hospitality by taking hundreds of pictures to post on their social media accounts. On behalf of the SHOWSIGHT team, I’d like to thank you all for your support of our efforts to spread the good news about purebred dogs and dog shows. SHOWSIGHT is the only All-Breed Publication to launch an educational breed publication for All AKC- Registered Breeds: All 197 of them. Our message within our company has been “We must educate!” Each Breed Magazine has just launched, and not a week or month will go by that more articles and interviews won’t be pub- lished—at no charge. Every day, we have judges, breeders and exhibitors tell us how they love our Breed Magazines. It is important to note that these Breed Magazines have not just been created to help judges in the show ring, but also to help preservation breeders protect and grow our community. With our aggressive, but well calculated, marketing approach, we are soon to reach one million views. Please visit www.showsightmagazine.com/breed- magazine to see all 197 Breed Magazines. Please help us to continue improving our publication by sharing your ideas and comments with us. We’ll look forward to hearing from you soon at a (big) dog show near you.

Friends, I hope that you were able to spend a part of the July 4th holiday celebrating our nation’s birthday with family and friends. Across the country, we can find hundreds—make that thousands— of ways to celebrate Independence Day. I know that many of you spent the weekend at large entry dog shows. (That sure sounds good to say, after all we went through in 2020!) This month, I’d like to discuss the importance of large entry dog shows. There’s been a growing understanding of the importance of large entry dog shows. Big shows receive the kind of media coverage that turns viewers into spectators, many of whom become purebred dog owners after just one visit to a show like Westminster, the National Dog Show or the AKC National Championship. These high vis- ibility events are crucial to the well-being of the fancy. They foster competition and create the kind of buzz that the sport of dogs so desperately needs. Not every big show, however, has a big advertising budget. Some clubs create a buzz by joining forces. The clusters that are being held this month create a lot of excitement within their commu- nities. They draw big entries and often attract local spectators, many of whom may have been unaware of our sport. So, how do we bring spectators to our shows in hopes that some will become purebred dog owners and, hopefully, show people? Well, I spend at least 30 to 40 hours on the phone each week with fanciers, and this question gets asked quite a bit. The bottom line is that our shows need entries to go up and we need more people to join the fancy. So, let’s get back to basics and consider ways to help every club become more successful. The following action items have been cre- ated for your consideration by the staff of our marketing department who have a combined 100+ years of experience. BUILD BRAND RECOGNITION Showcase Your Venue. Reach out to local radio stations, podcasts, newspapers, and TV stations. Introduce them to the sport of dogs, your show site and, most importantly, wow them with the numbers. For example: 1.3 million dogs are shown each year at AKC events; each weekend there are approximately 10 dog shows held nationwide; Westminster is the second-oldest sporting event held in the US. PHOTO BOMBING Send pictures and videos to your local media outlets and post them on social media pages. If your budget permits, contact Face- book to push your posts to everyone in your area. Costs will range from $25 to $500, depending on how strongly you want to push your message. MAKE FACE-TO-FACE CONNECTIONS Connecting with your audience on a personal level has a big impact on their engagement. Spend time talking about your dog show with neighbors and discuss how your event generates revenue within the community. Print flyers with a short, friendly message that encourages families and friends to attend. These should be dis- tributed throughout your community and plastered on the windows of small businesses. These important face-to-face connections have become rare in the virtual world and are much appreciated. STRENGTHEN YOUR COMMUNITY In addition to developing a connection with your organization, the people who attend your events can build relationships with each other and strengthen the community. There’s power in attend- ing an event when visitors discover other people who support the same cause, follow the same blog, or cheer for a local team. Meeting like-minded individuals in person will also encourage more active engagement online.

Yours Sincerely,

AJ ARAPOVIC, OWNER & PUBLISHER

Est 1992

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MINIATURE SCHNAUZER

LINES FROM LINDA PATRICIA CRAIGE TROTTER PUTS THE ICING ON THE CAKE

BY LINDA AYERS TURNER KNORR

F or 145 years, dog lovers have feasted on thrills of the Westminster Kennel Club! Like a great recipe, each year the Westminster team has perfected the ingredients that come together to top the previous year’s creation. For 2021, the Westminster collaborators had extraordinary vision. They overcame broadly complex and demanding circumstances, meeting the high expectations that the dog world devours at their event. Patricia Craige Trotter must have been euphoric as she was escorted into the ring by Westminster Kennel Club President Charlton Reynders, III, and Show Chairmen David A. Heming and David W. Haddock. Before awarding the two highly prized awards, she paused to make the following comments: “Without a doubt, the entire sport of dogs is grateful to the Westminster Kennel Club members and staff for persevering through troubled times to bring us out to this gorgeous estate and create this show for the ages. We thank them for all they have done!

Judge Patricia Craige Trotter speaks to the crowd before awarding Best in Show. L/R David A. Heming, David W. Haddock, and Charlton Reynders, III. Photo by Steve Surfman, Courtesy of The Westminster Kennel Club

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*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 4/30/21

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WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON

LINES FROM LINDA: PATRICIA CRAIGE TROTTER PUTS THE ICING ON THE CAKE

Photos by Derek Glas

We also want to thank the judges whose expertise ended up putting these dogs Best of Breed in their own breed, and the second set of judges who sent them to this glorious venue to compete for Best in Show. It was a sterling line-up. All of you are worthy. I want to say this to you. We love all dogs as dog lovers, mixed breeds and pure breeds. They are all pets. Now, every pet may not be a show dog, but be assured, every show dog is a pet. I certainly want to thank the breeders who have created these lines of beautiful animals. I’ve seen the ancestors of several of these dogs over the years. So, to the breeders and owners and handlers and trainers and conditioners, you’re on top of your game, all of you! There is one more I would like to thank, and that is my husband, Chuck Trotter. When I married him 27 years ago, he said, ‘You have to judge with me.’ So, here I am! And I want to thank all of the dogs that have brought us all here over the years.” Then, on live television for all the world to see from the Lyndhurst Estate in Tarrytown, New York, Mrs. Trotter put the icing on the cake with her final words, “Tonight’s RESERVE BEST IN SHOW goes to the lovely WHIPPET, and tonight’s BEST IN SHOW goes to the PEKINGESE!”

Fox Sports Team, Chris Myers, Gail Miller Bisher, and Donald Sturz shine under the lights before Best in Show judging. Photo by J. Grassa, Courtesy of The Westminster Kennel Club

For putting a fresh perspective on the 145th WKC Dog Show, applause goes to the lovely Gail Miller Bisher, Director of Communications for The Westminster Kennel Club, for leading her trio of sports commentators that includes Chris Myers and AKC Judge Donald Sturz. Having broadcast everything from the Super Bowl, World Series, NBA Finals, NCAA Finals, The Masters, The Triple Crown of horse racing, and the Daytona 500, Chris Myers adds his colorful expressions to man’s best friends as they compete for dogdom’s highest honors. This stellar threesome is a blessing to our sport.

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WEIMARANER

October 6th is approaching quickly, and Morris & Essex will be here before we know it. THIS YEAR, THERE WILL BE: • 39 Specialties • 101 Clubs Supporting • 40 Clubs Holding Sweepstakes • 82 Breed Judges • 30 Rings • 60 Stewards • 1/3 Mile of Tenting with Electric Receptacles • 203 Silver Revere Best of Breed Bowls • Complimentary Box Lunch for Every Dog Entered I invite you to join us in celebrating the spirit of the original Morris & Essex shows of the 1920s to the 1950s. Feel free to wear your vintage blazers and antique fox stoles for the ladies, and your tweed suits and two-tone shoes for the gentlemen. Don’t forget the crowning touch, your hats; cloches, bonnets, bowlers, fascinators or fedoras! WE’RE GETTING READY FOR YOU!

LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING YOU AT THE SHOW, WAYNE FERGUSON, PRESIDENT AND SHOW CHAIR MORRIS AND ESSEX KENNEL CLUB WWW.MORRISANDESSEXKENNELCLUB.ORG

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Champion

FLEETFIRE NOVAHEART Loki of Mischief

LOKI

Thank you judge MRS. NANCY SMITH HAFNER & MR. DANIEL J. SMYTH

BREEDERS & OWNERS: IVANOWA ORAN & MS. MARY SCHROEDER EXCLUSIVELY SHOWN BY KIMBERLY LOURIER

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FRENCH BULLDOG

Grand Champion CH HALLAM DESERT PHOENIX BAKHU’S MAX ONE IN A MILLION #1 PHARAOH HOUND * ALL BREED

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PHARAOH HOUND

TO THE FOLLOWING JUDGES Thank you GROUP PLACEMENTS: JACKSON TENNESEE DOG FANCIERS ASSOCIATION GROUP 4—DANA P. CLINE SPRINGFIELD KENNEL CLUB, INC. GROUP 4—DR. ERIC LIEBES SOUTH WINDSOR KENNEL CLUB GROUP 2—MS. DENISE FLAIM WILMINGTON KENNEL CLUB GROUP 3—MS. TERRY M. DEPIETRO PENN TREATY KENNEL CLUB GROUP 4—MR. NEIL T. MCDEVITT ST. HUBERT KENNEL CLUB GROUP 4—DR. DANIEL W. DOWLING WINDHAM COUNTY KENNEL CLUB GROUP 4—MRS. JAQUELINE L. STACY STATEN ISLAND KENNEL CLUB GROUP 3—MR. RICHARD L. REYNOLDS PLAINFIELD KENNEL CLUB GROUP 4—MRS. DANIELLE M. BROWN LADIES DOG CLUB GROUP 3—MS. KIMBERLY ANNE MEREDITH TACONIC HILLS KENNEL CLUB GROUP 3—MR. BRYAN MARTIN BRYN MAWR KENNEL CLUB GROUP 4—MR. ROBERT D. ENNIS PENOBSCOT VALLEY KENNEL CLUB GROUP 2—MR. TERRY STACY OWNERS: ROBERT NEWMAN, STACY THRELFALL & KENDRA WILLIAMS BREEDERS: DOMINIC PALLESCHI CAROTA, LUCIANE TERRA, ANDRE MAGNI, KENDRA WILLIAMS & LAURA HUGHES PROFESSIONALLY HANDLED BY STACY & EVAN THRELFALL

Patricia Trotter “NOT ALL PETS ARE SHOW DOGS, BUT I CAN ASSURE YOU, ALL SHOW DOGS ARE PETS” 145 TH WESTMINSTER BEST IN SHOW JUDGE

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 6/5/21

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PHOTOS RECORD THE HISTORY OF YOUR JOURNEY Preserving Your Memories

BY WALTER SOMMERFELT

B y all accounts, man has always had a way to preserve his his- tory. From carvings on cave walls to scrolls, drawings, paint- ings, photographs, and other objects, man has always found a way to keep a record of his history in our ever-changing and developing world. As human beings, everyone has some type of recorded history from the cradle to the grave. For most of us, it started at birth when that first photograph of the day we were born was taken. Our life in pictures was often followed by numerous other firsts in our lives; the first steps, first birthday, the first day of school, annual school pictures, certain religious ceremonies, kindergarten, elementary school, high school, and college graduations, the first dance, proms, engagements, weddings, and all of the special events in our lives. Preserving our memories has always been a great and valuable part of life. Most of us enjoy sitting down occasionally to view old photos from our youth; our parents and our many friends and family from years gone by. Each photo is a captured moment in time that can reignite significant memories from our life. For those of us born during the twentieth century, these memories vary greatly. During our youth, old-fashioned cameras that used film were used to record those moments. When you took a picture, it sat cap- tured on the film until the whole roll had been shot. Eventually, the film was sent to a lab to be developed. This process usually took a few days to a week, and you just hoped that the pictures came out well. If it was moving pictures you wanted, these were done on 8mm cameras that were fairly expensive, and most people did not own one. Eventually, in the late 1970s and early ‘80s, video cameras that used VHS or BETA tape were developed so that you could now record and preserve every moment— almost in an instant. These early video cameras were large and bulky, but you were now able to record all of those special moments in life as home movies. In the early days, photographs were only taken in black and white. With progress, eventually, color photos came on the scene. In all cases, you saw the actual photo as it was taken. There were no do-overs and you could not see the pictures until they were developed. Kodak was a huge company back in the day and was known for having the best film, cameras, and film development.

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POMERANIANS & BIEWER TERRIERS T riple C rown

# 1

BIEWER TERRIER *

RUS. CH, AKC GCHB IRISH JAZZ DZHAGA-DZHAGA Donny

WESTMINSTER SELECT DOG

Bred by Irena Belova

Owned by Michele Lyons, Daniel Yona, Noble Inglett, and Theresa Tafoya

# 1

BIEWER TERRIER ALL BREED **

Win RUS. CH, AKC CH OLA DE GRAS VERY WONDERFUL WINS, CM4 WESTMINSTER AWARD OF MERIT

Bred by Olga Ptichenko

Owned by Michele Lyons, Cindi Iken, Daniel Yona, Noble Inglett, and Theresa Tafoya

THANK YOU TO JUDGE GEORGE MILUTINOVICH AND OUR WONDERFUL HANDLERS TONIA HOLIBAUGH AND EDGAR CRUZ GUEVARA FOR THEIR EXPERT HANDLING!

WWW.TRIPLECROWNPOMERANIANS.COM

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BIEWER TERRIER

GCHG Lyonnese Blueprint Of A Legend RESERVE BEST IN SHOW

The Group Winning Continues

THANK YOU JUDGES MR. JOHN P. WADE, MR. JOE C. WALTON & MR. DENNIS J. GALLANT – GROUP ONE

Group Placements

THANK YOU JUDGES MRS. POLLY (MRS. ROBERT) D. SMITH – GROUP SECOND

MRS. LINDA HURLEBAUS – GROUP THIRD MRS. DANELLE M. BROWN – GROUP FOURTH

the number one RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK BREED & ALL BREED* the number five hound *

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

OWNED BY NICOLE DAVIS, MAUREEN TAUBER & DEBBIE HOLLY

BRED BY DEBBIE HOLLY & MAUREEN TAUBER

EXCLUSIVELY HANDLED BY FRANK MURPHY

*AKC STATS AS OF 5/31/21

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PRESERVING YOUR MEMORIES

Many of today’s photographers go back to those days of old film and development. They are the men and women who truly developed the “eye” for the best picture of the dog. For a show photographer, producing high-quality photos was the only way to succeed in the business. In those days, photos were mostly taken in the ring, and the wonderful backdrops that we see today were not present. Likewise, the lighting and conditions also affected the outcome. There was not the ability to crop or lighten and darken photos as we have today. What they shot is what you got, for bet- ter or worse. Today, technology has become a great asset in the dog show photography world. Digital cameras allow today’s photographers to take numerous shots and review them instantly to see that everything looks as it should. If it doesn’t, they can take another while the judge, the dog, and the handler are still present. Tech- nology, whether you see it as good or bad, also allows them to do this thing called “Photoshop.” They can make corrections to the sign if something was forgotten, and they can crop and enhance the colors and make little adjustments to make the dog look its best. (Some of these people are even very good at eliminating a tongue hanging out, helping to fix a topline or altering little things to make the photo “perfect.”) They can also send the owners either printed or digital copies of the wins, which can be used in advertisements or just as addi- tions to our recorded history of each dog—to be preserved forever in print or on the cloud. As a breeder, owner, and exhibitor, I cherish many of these win photos and I have books and books of them. They are wonderful memories of the dogs we have loved and lost as well as those special wins that keep us coming back. Although in today’s world we can all take instant photos or videos of our dogs in the ring, it is only the official photographer who is allowed to take those official win photos at the shows. Exhibitors need to respect these individuals and their profession. You should not stand behind the photographer and try to take the same shot with your cell phone. When you do that, you are violating copyright laws and could be subject to lawsuits from the photographer. Almost every premium list identifies the show pho- tographer and indicates that only the official photographer can take the official win pictures. Just like any other professional, these people bring value to the dog show world and have been doing so for a very long time. Most show photographers are very warm and considerate peo- ple who are trying very hard to provide the exhibitors with the best possible picture of their wins. These people are patient individu- als who are supplying you with a service. Their time, equipment, and investment in their business need to be respected. When you request a winning photo, you are taking up the time of the judge as well as that of the photographer—and his expertise. You should never take a photo if you have no intention of purchasing it. Some people think that a judge will be offended if they don’t request a photo. As a judge of over 35 years, I can tell you that this is not the case. If a judge is offended because you did not take a photo, shame on him or her. Photos are wonderful memories, but as we all know, they cost money. If an exhibitor chooses not to take a photo of each win, it should not matter to the judge. Every exhibitor does not have an unlimited budget and each one has a reason to choose to have a photo taken or not. Remember that the official photographer is there for you. The knowledge, experience, and high-quality equipment they use will give you great memories to preserve for all time. Preserve your memories; they are the history of your journey.

As with many things, technology has improved and now you will find it difficult to even find film for your old cameras. Kodak is no longer a giant in the industry, and digital and cell phones have taken over photography. Photo and video technologies are avail- able instantly for the majority of people. Today, people use their cell phones to record or photograph almost everything. Preserving every event in our lives is now very inexpensive and it fills a lot of memory on our computers and devices. Many people no longer print and save pictures in those old photo albums that we used to have to hold and store somewhere. Many of us old-timers have numerous volumes of our own or those that were passed down to us, and we cherish every memory of days gone by. Those memories are precious and they bring great enjoyment to so many of us. It is also true that in the sport of purebred dogs, photographs have a long and storied history of preserving the past as well as the present. Among the most overlooked (but very much involved) people at any dog show are the official photographers. These indi- viduals play a vital role at each show in the preservation of memo- ries for many owners, breeders, and exhibitors in our sport. It is the official photographer who takes those win photos that so many of us save to preserve as a recorded history of our successes in the show ring. Dog show photographers can vary greatly in experience, knowl- edge, and ability. They must learn the different breeds so that they can capture them at their best. A good photographer needs to know what the proper stack is. Does the breed standard specify how the ears are to be held? And does it need to show expression? What is called for in the toplines and tails, and so on? The official photographer’s job is to try to make the exhibit look its very best. For many years, these talented people also used the film that was previously mentioned. They did not have the luxury to be able to look at the photos until they were developed. So, for many years, even though the majority of their shots were wonderful, it was not uncommon for there to be a “dud” now and then because of a split- second movement that spoiled the picture. Back in those days, you would receive proofs in the mail for you to review and order the picture you wanted. In most cases, there were usually two shots to choose from because, as mentioned earlier, the high cost of film and development did not allow for unlimited shots of the win. “AS A BREEDER, OWNER, AND EXHIBITOR, I CHERISH MANY OF THESE WIN PHOTOS AND I HAVE BOOKS AND BOOKS OF THEM. THEY ARE WONDERFUL MEMORIES OF THE DOGS WE HAVE LOVED AND LOST AS WELL AS THOSE SPECIAL WINS THAT KEEP US COMING BACK.”

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G C H B Z Ö L D M Á L I K O N G O

W I R E H A I R E D V I Z S L A A L L B R E E D * # 1 *AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/21

Candid photos by © Hal Stata Stata Productions, LLC

2020 AKC NAT IONAL BEST OF BREED JUDGE JAMI E HUBBARD

RAVENNA KENNEL CLUB BEST IN SHOW JUDGE DR. ALBERT B IANCHI

HANDLED BY: NICK GRUBB & CHELSAY PAUL BRED BY: ZSOF IA MICZEK, ZÖLDMÁL I KENNEL • OWNED BY: CHARLENE TRAUB

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 55

WIREHAIRED VIZSLA

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Embark’s Test for Genetic Coefficient of Inbreeding (COI) Brings A New Tool to Breeders

F or millennia, dog breeders have intentionally bred relatives as a way to fix traits in a lineage. A century ago, Sewall Wright devised the coef- ficient of inbreeding (COI) as a way to mea- sure inbreeding, a statistic still popular today. Like humans, dogs tend to be 99.8-99.9% genetically similar to other members of their species. Even other species can exhibit simi- larities—dogs and humans are 64% similar at the base pair level. But genetic variation is the spice of life, and the 0.1-0.2% of the genome that differs encodes a myriad of variation. Some of these variations we have intentionally perpetuated, like body shape, coat color, and behavior. Unfortunately, other less desirable variants confer potentially harmful effects on health, longevity, and reproductive success. Harmful mutations come in three main varieties; recessive, dominant, and additive. The harmful dominant and additive mutations are quickly weeded out in large, outbred popu- lations. This occurs because the individual car- rying these mutations has a reduced fitness. Recessive mutations, on the other hand, are different. A harmful recessive mutation might “break” a gene. This has little or no conse- quence if an individual has a working copy of the gene from his or her other parent. How- ever, this can have disastrous consequences when an individual inherits two broken copies. Outbred individuals almost never inherit two broken copies. Therefore, natural selection or breeders cannot effectively select against them

unless there is a genetic test for the mutation. For example, if a mutation is at 1% frequency in an outbred population, any given dog has a 0.01% chance of inheriting two copies of the mutation—clearly a very small chance. As such, every dog popula- tion—or in the context of purebred dogs, every dog breed—contains an abundance of rare recessive mutations that were either present in a founder individual or arose spon- taneously in the dog population sometime afterwards. These rare mutations are hardly ever problematic for outbred individuals because they almost always inherit at least one working copy; however, they can cause real problems for inbred individuals—animals that arise from the mating of closely related parents. Let’s consider what happens with dogs in a mother-son mating. A mother passes along 50% of her genome to each pup, so each rare (<1% frequency) recessive muta- tion carried by the mother has a 50% chance of being transmitted to a son. Offspring from a mother-son mating would, therefore, have a 25% chance of inheriting two bad copies of the mutations that have been passed down to the son. This is a greater than 100-fold risk compared to an outbred dog! Inbreeding in dogs has real consequences. Research in the Embark Co-Founder Adam Boyko Lab has shown that a 10% increase in inbreeding can lead to a 6% reduction in adult size (poor growth) and a six- to ten-month reduction in lifespan. Reduced litter size and fertility are also likely. These risks occur from both classical inbreeding and from drift in small populations where every individual is a not-so-distant relative. Assessing these risks depends on accurately quantifying the likelihood that mutations will be identical-by-descent, or inherited from the same ancestor.

56 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021

# 1 LEONBERGER ALL SYSTEMS *

GROUP WINNER | MULTIPLE GROUP PLACEMENTS | BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNER BISS GCHG BLUDRIFT ’ S ESCAPADES WITH ETHAN CGC OWNED BY MARY MONAHAN & LUANNE MOEDE | BRED BY LUANNE MOEDE | HANDLED BY CHELSAY PAUL GRUBB ETHAN

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 57

LEONBERGER

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IDEALLY, THE PEDIGREE IS COMPLETE ALL THE WAY BACK TO THE FOUNDING OF THE BREED. HOWEVER, IN REALITY, MOST PEDIGREES ONLY GO BACK, MAYBE, 5 TO 10 GENERATIONS. MOST COI CALCULATORS

CALCULATING COI There are three ways to quantify the coefficient of inbreeding (COI): (1) Using a pedigree, (2) Trying a small set of polymorphic markers, or (3) Testing a genome-wide marker panel. How do you easily find out? Pedigree-Based COI are based on the relatedness of individu- als in a pedigree. 25% is the value from a mother-son or full-sibling mating; 12.5% being the value from a grandparent-grandchild or half-sibling mating; and 6.25% being the value from a first cousin mating. These values accumulate. Logically, all individuals have COIs between 0% (completely outbred) and 100% (completely inbred). So, three generations of full-sibling matings would lead to a COI of 50%. Ideally, the pedigree is complete all the way back to the founding of the breed. However, in reality, most pedigrees only go back, maybe, 5 to 10 generations. Most COI calculators assume that the original ancestors in the pedigree are unrelated. Therefore, a COI calculated from a 5-generation pedigree could be much lower than that calculated from a 10-generation pedigree. This is likely much lower than the true COI if the complete pedi- gree back to the breed founders was known. For this reason, there’s no one answer for what a “good” COI is; it all depends on how complete the pedigree is. Furthermore, because of the principle of segregation, two individuals with identical expected COIs from a pedigree may have very different levels of inbreeding. This depends on which individuals inherit which chromosomal segments. Marker-Based Inbreeding uses dozens or hundreds of widely spaced markers to estimate inbreeding. Each marker can be hetero- zygous or homozygous (identical by state). The overall locus het- erozygosity (HL) of the panel is generally correlated with inbreed- ing. However, the absolute values of HL depend on the markers that are chosen. Because a rare marker being homozygous is stron- ger evidence of inbreeding (identity by descent) than a common marker being homozygous, different weightings may be used to calculate statistics like internal relatedness (IR). This varies from -1 to 1. Nevertheless, most of the genome is not linked to any marker. Therefore, estimators do not detect most inbreeding tracts. As a result, it makes marker-based estimators poorly suited for dif- ferentiating between individuals with similar COIs (less than 5-10% different). Genome-Wide COI is the gold standard for measuring inbreed- ing. It requires at least tens of thousands of markers spread across the genome. The Embark Dog DNA kit includes Genomic-wide COI results. With this resolution, the actual inbreeding tracts can be directly observed as tracks of homozygous markers. Above a cer- tain size, these runs almost always represent identity-by-descent,

and thus we can easily calculate the coefficient of inbreeding (the proportion of the genome that is identical by descent). At Embark, we use about 1 million basepairs, known as 1 centimorgan, as the minimum size of each track. This is because we are interested in inbreeding all the way back to a breed’s founding; remember, for most domestic dog breeds, this is usually 50-100 generations ago. Calculating COI directly using genome-wide data has several advantages. It doesn’t require a pedigree. Also, it doesn’t depend on marker frequencies or require complicated statistics to correct for rare/common markers. And finally, it is directly comparable across studies because it doesn’t depend on the specifics of the markers used or the populations being studied. Inbreeding tracts are apparent using genome-wide data. Ped- igree-based and marker-based estimators often miss these tracts. Comparing an individual to the COI distribution for the breed lets you know whether a dog is more or less inbred than expect- ed for its breed. You can visualize the inbreeding tracts to see where in the genome they are found. Accurate determination of inbreeding tracts is crucial for identifying recessive disease muta- tions through homozygosity mapping. It is also crucial for more precisely understanding the risks of inbreeding within and across breeds. Although some level of inbreeding cannot be avoided for most purebred dog breeds, and inbreeding risk shouldn’t be the only consideration when selecting mates, reducing the inbreeding load in a population is a valuable goal. ASSUME THAT THE ORIGINAL ANCESTORS IN THE PEDIGREE ARE UNRELATED. THEREFORE, A COI CALCULATED FROM A 5-GENERATION PEDIGREE COULD BE MUCH LOWER THAN THAT CALCULATED FROM A 10-GENERATION PEDIGREE.

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SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 59

Thank you judge Mr. Sam Houston McDonald

Breeder: Barbara Randle Owners:

Barbara Randle Parker Lourier Exclusively shown by: Team Lourier

SI LVER GRAND CHAMPION & CHAMPION Remingtons Borador Baboo

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RETRIEVER (LABRADOR)

®

®

CONGRATULATIONS, WASABI!

Congratulations to Wasabi, the 2021 WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB BEST IN SHOWWINNER. With his distinctive rolling gait, dignified temperament, and natural charisma, the 3-year-old Pekingese won over the crowd and judges. We’re proud to be a part of Wasabi’s amazing victory, fueling him with the advanced nutrition of Purina Pro Plan Complete Essentials Shredded Blend Chicken & Rice Formula.

FIND THE NUTRITION FOR THE CHAMPION IN YOUR LIFE AT PROPLAN.COM/DRYDOGFOOD

The handler or owners of this champion may have received Pro Plan dog food as Purina ambassadors. Purina trademarks are owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A.

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 61

We Lo e Dog Shows!

And Dog Shows Love Us!

We’ve hosted lots of dog shows! NOW we want to host YOURS!

Past Shows Include: 2019 SCA National Specialty 2018 CSPCA Nationals 2017 IWSCA Nationals 2016 ABTC National Specialty Show 2015 SBCA Nationals Many more!

“The Chinese Shar-Pei Club of America had their 2018 National Specialty in South Sioux City, NE. The accommodations were wonderful and the exhibitors really enjoyed the location of the show.”

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62 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 63

SOFT COATED WHEATEN TERRIER

Schohaus Dobermans HOME OF THE BEAUTIFUL DOBERMAN John and Lori Schoeneman, Wayne Kerr, schohaus.net

Breeders: John & Lori Schoeneman schohaus.net Owners: John & Lori Schoeneman Wayne Kerr

Handler: Diego Garcia

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

G O L D G R A N D C H A M P I O N

Schohaus Let The Sunshine In

AM GCH Alpha’s The Conquistador RA ROM TDI BFL-1 LC10D x CH Schohaus Key To Audacity

TheWinningImage.com

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 65

GCH CH DAZZLES FAITH

Owner: Linda Evans Breeders: Donna Jensen and Linda Evans

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CHIHUAHUA (SMOOTH COAT)

*

*AKC STATS AS OF 4/30/21

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 67

BEAGLE

BIS-RBIS-BISS-GCHS CHARTEROAK TRAXX OF Grandeur

Afghan Hound * Among All Breeds * # 1 # 1 # 5 Hound *

Grandeur... FOR THE RECORD BOOKS!

• Grandeur has owned 12 All-Breed Best In Show Winners with over 300 Bests collectively. • Grandeur has owned 18 Specialty Best in Show winners with over 200 Specialties earned. (when the average Specialty Entry was close to 100 Afghans at most events). • Specialty Records were held by Champions: Shirkhan, Blu Shah, Triumph and Tryst, all of Grandeur . • Ch. Tryst of Grandeur holds the record as the “Top Winning Hound of All Time” (her dam Ch. Shahpphire of Grandeur held the record as the Top winning BIS Afghan Hound (female) • Ch. Triumph of Grandeur (Trysts sire) holds the record as the “Top Winning Hound (male) of All Time. • Ch. Shahrp and Trademark of Grandeur each held the record as the Youngest Afghan Hound Champions (8 months, 11 days and 6 months and 17 days, respectively) • Ch. Rings True of Grandeur was the youngest Afghan Hound BIS winner at 10 months of age. • There have been over 300 champions by a Grandeur Sire or Damn of Significance. • Ch. Charteroak Traxx of Grandeur : AKA: Simba… is currently the Nation’s Top Hound and among the Top Five of All Breeds: There hasn’t been an Afghan Hound in the Top Ten All breed in the past three decades, the last were Ch. Tryst of Grandeur and her sire Triumph: Triumph is also the Sire of Simba!

Grandeur – est. 1941

Grandeur – Evelyn and Bill Rechler, Mill Neck, NY

CHARTEROAK – Gene and Shelly Vaccaro, Oxford, CT

Exclusive Handler – Teri Tevlin

68 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021

AFGHAN HOUND

*AKC stats as of 5/31/21

BIS-RBIS-BISS-GCHS CHARTEROAK TRAXX OF Grandeur

Simba

© MARY MORRIS

Thank you to these judges for recognizing this Afghan Hound with over 80 years of judicious breeding behind him.

Mary Ann Alston Eva Berg Eugene Blake David Bolus Andrea Bradford, MD Danelle Brown Timothy Catterson

Dana P. Cline Clay Coady Jon Cole John Constantine-Amodei Nancy L. Daugherty

Denise Flaim Douglas R. Holloway, Jr Anne Katona Eric Liebes Carl Gene Liepmann Bryan Martin Neil T. McDevitt

Sylvie McGee James J. Mitchell James A. Moses Ken Murray Allen L. Odom Richard L. Reynolds Polly Smith

Terry Stacy Jacqueline L. Stacy Lawrence Terricone

Sandra Walker Eliott B. Weiss

Terry M. DePietro Daniel W. Dowling

Grandeur – Evelyn and Bill Rechler, Mill Neck, NY

CHARTEROAK – Gene and Shelly Vaccaro, Oxford, CT

Exclusive Handler – Teri Tevlin

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 69

4 X B E S T I N S P E C I A LT Y W I N N E R 2 0 2 0 & NUMBER ONE I R I S H T E R R I E R I N 2 0 2 0 * SPRING 2021 CONAR’ S WINS MONTICELLO KC J ACQUEL I NE STACY (G2 ) , MARCH 1 4 KC OF ANNE ARUNDEL JOE WALTON, APR I L 1 KC OF ANNE ARUNDEL EL I ZABETH MUTHARD, APR I L 2 TROY KC DR . JOHN IOI A , APR I L 1 0 TRAP FALLS KC STEVE HAYDEN, APR I L 1 1 HARRI SBURG KC BR I AN BOGART ( PROV I S IONAL ) , APR I L 1 4 LEBANON COUNTY KC DR . DAN I EL DOWL I NG, APR I L 1 6 HARRI SBURG KC RODNEY HERNER , APR I L 1 7 MASON & DIXON KC TODDI E HOUSTON CLARK , APR I L 1 8 WI LMINGTON KC JOHN CONSTANT I NE-AMODE I , APR I L 30 UNION COUNTY KC JUL I E FELTEN, MAY 27 STATEN I SLAND KC AL I CE M. WATK I NS , MAY 29 PLAINF I ELD KC J AN R I TCHI E GLADSTONE , MAY 30 PLAINF I ELD KC APR I L CLYDE , MAY 3 1 J AMI E HUBBARD, MAY 3 1 ITCNY SPECIALTY WI LL I AM DEV I LLENEUVE , JUNE 1 2 BRYN MAWR KC J ENN I FER A . MOORE , JUNE 1 9 LYDI A COLEMAN-HUTCHI NSON, JUNE 20 THANK YOU JUDGES JUL I E FELTON, AL ICE M. WATKINS , JAN RITCHI E GLADSTONE , APRI L CLYDE , WI LL IAM DEVI LLENUEVE , J ENNI FER A. MOORE AND LYDIA COLEMAN-HUTCHINSON

B R E D B Y : T E R R I VA N D E Z A N D E

H A N D L E D B Y : J A M E S D I C K S O N

OW N E D B Y : N I N A WA R R E N

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IRISH TERRIER

NUMBER TWO I R I S H T E R R I E R *

©David Sombach

B R E E Z Y ’ S C H A R M I N G C O N A R T I S T G C H G M E R R Y M A C Z T R I K I N G X C H B R E E Z Y ’ S H O T T O P I C silver grand champion

MULTI PLE SPECIALTY WINNER • MULTI PLE GROUP PLACEMENTS • GROUP WINNER

SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 71

*AKC BREED STATS AS OF 5/31/21

*

*AKC ALL BREED STATS AS OF 10/31/20

72 | SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021

CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI

M U L T I P L E G R O U P W I N N I N G & P L A C I N G

GCHS CH OVERO SUMMER LOVE

Ruby

CH DELL-ROSS BRYNLEA BLACK HOLE BLUES X CH OVERO PINKALICIOUS AX OAJ

THANK YOU JUDGES MS. NANCY SIMMONS & MS. PEGGY BEISEL-MCILWAINE

BREED * #7 ALL BREED * #4

OWNED BY JENNIFER PORTER DELMER

CO-OWNED & BRED BY JAIME BRAGG

EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY MICHAEL SHEPHERD

ASSISTED BY DOTTIE JAMES

*AKC STATS AS OF 5/31/21 SHOWSIGHT MAGAZINE, JULY 2021 | 73

PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

Form Follows FUNCTION

BY STEPHANIE HEDGEPATH

CANINE DENTITION: WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL?

A dog is born with no teeth in his mouth at all. Just as with human dentition, dogs have two sets of teeth in their lifetime. The first set of 28 deciduous puppy teeth (often called milk teeth because they erupt between 3-6 weeks while the pups are still nursing) does not contain molars as there is no need for them while pups are nursing. (See Figure 1.) These tiny, sharp teeth with a small root are all in place by two months of age and are 28 in number. Normal eruption times for the deciduous teeth are as follows:

• Incisors 4-6 weeks; • Canines 3-5 weeks; • Premolars 5-6 weeks.

Puppy teeth are usually shed easily around four months of age. However, sometimes a pup’s deciduous teeth don’t shed properly, with the most common problem being the retention of a puppy tooth. This causes the permanent tooth to erupt next to the retained puppy tooth, which can cause the permanent tooth to be positioned incorrectly and the puppy tooth to be surgically removed. On occa- sion, a deciduous tooth is retained simply because there is no perma- nent tooth to take its place. This tooth can remain functional for a fairly long time. The permanent teeth begin to erupt at three months of age. As these permanent teeth develop within the jaws, the roots of the deciduous teeth are absorbed by the surrounding tissues and are shed. By six months of age, the deciduous teeth have been replaced by a full set of permanent adult teeth, so “teething” in a pup is gen- erally most common between three and six months of age. Normal eruption times for permanent teeth are as follows:

• Incisors 12-16 weeks; • Canines 12-16 weeks; • Premolars 16-20 weeks; • Molars 20-24 weeks of age.

Figure 1. Deciduous (Puppy) Teeth

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